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A Scholar’s Library of Haiku in English is a selected bibliography of books in English generated by the collective efforts of the Juxtapositions staff intended to promote the development of scholarship on haiku. Over the last fifty years there has been a tremendous growth in the variety and number of poets embracing haiku as their primary literary art. These haiku writers, editors, and publishers are part of a community that is eager to learn more about the haiku traditions in order to shape their own traditions through practice, critique and publication. Access to quality translations of haiku and significant scholarship on poets and Japanese literary history has helped provide a better understanding of the origins and contemporary practices in Japan. The last fifty years has been a rich cultural and artistic exchange, with a growing body of scholarship about haiku poetics, the history of haiku, and the ever-shifting landscape of innovative experimentation and mature practice evident in anthologies and scholarship.

This bibliography is intended to be a call for quality research and scholarship on haiku. We need more critical studies of excellent individual haiku poets. We need more studies on the connections between haiku and other literary movements and other arts. We need more literary history of haiku in English and the global movement of haiku as an international cultural experiment. We need more comparative literature of haiku across cultures including explorations of the relationship of haiku in English to Japanese haiku. We need more critical reviews of experimentation in haiku.

The editors of Juxtapositions have reviewed several libraries and known collections of English-language books available in order to create this short bibliography of some of the most important works of criticism and scholarship on haiku currently available. We have organized the bibliography into five sections: (1) Haiku in English Bibliographies, (2) Scholarly Books in English on Haiku, (3) Teaching Haiku & Poet’s Craft Books, (4) A Haiku Scholar’s Anthologies, and (5) Online Resources.

We plan to do a follow-up bibliography on dissertations and theses related to haiku. Several books included in this bibliography, such as Robert Aitken’s A Zen Wave: Bashō’s Haiku & Zen began as a graduate study thesis. There have been a surprising number of such studies, and we intend to review and pull together a short guide to those in the future. Haiku scholarship is diverse and scattered in several disciplines, so we hope A Scholar’s Library of Haiku in English is a good start to gathering awareness of these resources in one place. We know that this bibliography is not definitive and welcome your suggestions of titles to be considered for inclusion in an evolving online version of this bibliography. To recommend books to be considered for future updates of this bibliography, send your suggestions and comments to: <rbrooks@millikin.edu>.

Haiku in English Bibliographies

The following are the known bibliographies of haiku in English. The first bibliography, Haiku in Western Langauges: An Annotated Bibliography, provided a thorough review of books and articles available before 1972. Randy & Shirley Brooks published a biennial bibliography of haiku books in print from 1980 until 1987. Randy Brooks has also maintained the Decatur Haiku Collection bibliography at Millikin University since 2000, and Charles Trumbull has an extensive database of haiku publications that is the basis for his bibliography available on The Haiku Foundation website. It should be noted that the American Haiku Archives and other special collections related to specific haiku poets at libraries such as Loras College (Raymond Roseliep) and the Rutgers Unviersity (Nicholas Virgilio) also have extensive collections of haiku in English with searchable databases of haiku publications. Also, several special collections of poetry include many haiku publications. Especially noteworthy collections are housed at Brown University, the University of Buffalo, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Association of Haiku Poets. A Catalogue of Non-Japanese Books & Magazines in the Library of the Museum of Haiku Literature. Tokyo: Association of Haiku Poets, 2003.
Brooks, Randy. Haiku & Tanka Books and Journals: a Bibliography of Publications in the Decatur Haiku Collection. Decatur, IL: Millikin University, 2014. Available online as a pdf file at the Millikin University Performance Learning web site.
Brooks, Randy, Editor. Haiku Review ’87. Battleground, IN: High/Coo Press, 1987.
Brooks, Randy, Editor. Haiku Review ’84. Battleground, IN: High/Coo Press, 1984.
Brooks, Randy, Editor. Haiku Review ’82. Battleground, IN: High/Coo Press, 1982.
Brooks, Randy, Editor. Haiku Review ’80. Battleground, IN: High/Coo Press, 1980.
Brower, Gary L. Haiku in Western Languages: An Annotated Bibliography. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press, 1972.
Coon, Scott and Tom Hartman. A Haiku Bibliography. Camden, NJ: Rutgers University, 2014. Available online at the Nick Virgilio Poetry Project website.
Figgins, Ross. “A Basic Bibliography of Haiku in English.” Bulletin of Bibliography, 36.1, Westwood, MA: F.W. Faxon Company, Inc., 1979, pages 45-49.
Trumbull, Charles. A Haiku Bibliography, Version 1.2, May, 2009. Available online at The Haiku Foundation website.
American Haiku Archives. A special collection of the California State Library. See the website for guidance on searching the archives.

Scholarly Books in English on Haiku

There are more scholarly books on haiku than one might expect, and they fall into three main groups, two of which have sub-categories. The first and largest group consists of books on Japanese haiku, with an initial sub-category of monographs that focus upon a single poet. Not surprisingly, Bashō is the most studied master, but there are also volumes in English on Issa, Buson, Chiyō, and Shiki. With a few notable exceptions, these books consist primarily of translations; they usually include a certain amount of historical and cultural background, but tend to offer only limited analysis. Among the exceptions is Robert Aitken’s A Zen Wave: Bashō’s Haiku & Zen, with mini-essays on individual poems from a Zen master’s perspective, and Makoto Ueda’s Bashō and His Interpreters: Selected Hokku with Commentary. This latter book offers a rare opportunity to explore how Bashō’s poems were traditionally understood in Japan, including some cases of fascinatingly different interpretations over the past several hundred years.

Historical surveys of haiku (and, more rarely, senryū) form a second sub-category well represented in English-language books. R.H. Blyth’s volumes take precedence; although some later commentators criticize what they consider his over-reliance on Zen interpretations, no one has come close to the extraordinary amount of material he has published, and his translations from half a century ago hold up in the present day. Most historical surveys do not extend very far into contemporary haiku. However, some recent volumes have addressed the earliest haiku (in this case, hokku and haikai) before the form was thoroughly established in Japan. One is Steven D. Carter’s useful study, Haiku Before Haiku: From the Renga Masters to Bashō. A few other books also take unique approaches, such as The Art of Haiku by Stephen Addiss, which begins with the earliest Japanese poetry and features haiku painting, known as haiga.

A third sub-category consists of books that do not take Japanese haiku as their primary theme, but offer some commentaries within a larger context. Among these are publications by leading scholars of Japanese literature such as Donald Keene, Earl Miner, Kato Shuichi, and Haruo Shirane, but only the last has also published a book centering on haiku: Traces of Dreams: Landscape, Cultural History and the Poetry of Bashō. In this sub-category one could add Roland Barthes, who discusses haiku briefly in his Empire of Signs. More traditional in approach are Kawamoto Koji’s The Poetics of Japanese Verse and Ueda Makoto’s Literary and Art Theories in Japan; Ueda has also published two books on Bashō and one on Buson.

In the second large grouping of scholarly books, examinations of English-language haiku are paramount. Here the initial sub-category consists of studies of individual poets, so far including Richard Wright, Clement Hoyt, and Raymond Roseliep. This is certainly an area where much more remains to be done, especially as evaluations of the first and second-generation of English-language haiku poets are beginning to coalesce.

Next come books that treat haiku in English more broadly. These include several important studies by William Higginson; in particular, his Haiku World takes a fully international approach. Other volumes in this sub-category are Studies in English Haiku by Nakagawa Atsuo and The Modern English Haiku by George Swede.

Dealing with a specific element in haiku, In Due Season: A Discussion of the Role of Kigo in English-language Haiku, edited by A.C. Missias, tackles one of the significant issues in transposing a Japanese genre to the Western world. Higginson’s The Haiku Seasons: Poetry of the Natural World offers interesting specifics in this regard. Conceived more broadly is Richard Gilbert’s A Disjunctive Dragonfly: A New Approach to English-language Haiku.

The final group of scholarly books contrasts Japanese and English-language haiku. The title of another book by Gilbert clearly defines this theme: Poems of Consciousness: Contemporary Japanese & English-language Haiku in Cross-cultural Perspective. More studies comparing Japanese and English-language haiku would be welcome, with the proviso that poets in the West tend to be more aware of traditional Japanese haiku, such as those by Bashō and Buson, than of contemporary Japanese examples, which range from fully traditional to wildly experimental.

Of course, there are books that do not fit neatly into the groupings and sub-categories discussed. One such volume is Kenneth Yasuda’s The Japanese Haiku: Its Essential Nature, History, and Possibilities in English; more personal approaches are taken in The Nick of Time: Essays on Haiku Aesthetics by Paul O.Williams and A Year’s Speculations on Haiku by Robert Spiess.

What will come next in research and publications on haiku? All of the above approaches can certainly be continued to good avail, especially studies of modern and contemporary poets and their haiku. In addition, various forms of scholarly interactions between East and West have much to offer. Meetings, discussions, and publications such as the Modern Haiku Association’s Proceedings of the First International Contemporary Haiku Symposium can be of great use to poets and readers, whatever their languages. With our cultural world gradually shrinking, the field of haiku is becoming more and more international, and future publications will certainly both reflect and promote this trend.

Addiss, Stephen. The Art of Haiku: Its History Through Poems and Paintings of the Japanese Masters. Boston & London: Shambala, 2012.
Aitken, Robert. A Zen Wave: Bashô’s Haiku & Zen. New York and Tokyo: John Weatherhill, Inc., 1978.
Amann, Eric. The Wordless Poem: A Study of Zen in Haiku. Toronto, Ontario: The Haiku Society of Canada, 1978.
Barthes, Roland. Translated by Richard Howard. Empire of Signs. New York: Hill and Wang, 1982. Originally published in French, 1970.
Bashō, Matsuo. Translated by Jane Reichhold. Bashō: the Complete Haiku. New York: Kodansha International, 2008.
Beichman, Janine. Masaoka Shiki. Boston, MA: Twayne Publishers, 1982.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. A History of Haiku: Volume 1, From the Beginnings to Issa. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1963. Seventh printing, 1976.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. A History of Haiku: Volume 2, From Issa to the Present. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1964. Fifth printing, 1976.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Japanese Humour. Tokyo, Japan: Japan Travel Bureau, 1957.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Japanese Life and Character in Senryu. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1960. First printing, 1960.
Blyth, R.H. Zen in English Literature and Oriental Classics. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1942.
Buson, Yosa. Edited and translated by Edith Marcombe Shiffert and Yuki Sawa. Haiku Master Buson: Translations from the Writings of Yosa Buson—Poet and Artist—With Related Materials. Union City, CA: Heian International, 1978.
Carter, Steven D. Haiku Before Haiku: From the Renga Masters to Bashō. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.
Dayton, David, Editor. A Roseliep Retrospective: Poems & Other Words By and About Raymond Roseliep. Ithaca, NY: Alembic Press, 1980. Signed by Raymond Roselieip.
Donegan, Patricia and Yoshie Ishibashi. Chiyo-ni Woman Haiku Master. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1998.
Donegan, Patricia. Haiku Mind: 108 Poems to Cultivate Awareness and Open Your Heart. Boston, MA: Shambala, 2008.
Gilbert, Richard. The Disjunctive Dragonfly: A New Approach to English-language Haiku. Winchester, VA: Red Moon Press, 2013.
Gilbert, Richard. Poems of Consciousness: Contemporary Japanese & English-language Haiku in Cross-cultural Perspective. Winchester, VA: Red Moon Press, 2008. [Includes a DVD with Gendai Haiku Poet interviews.] Henderson, Harold G. Haiku in English. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1967.
Higginson, William J. The Haiku Seasons: Poetry of the Natural World. New York: Kodansha International, 1996.
Higginson, William J. Haiku World: An International Poetry Almanac. New York: Kodansha International, 1996.
Higginson, William J. Itadakimasu: Essays on Haiku and Senryu in English. Kanona, NY: J & C Transcripts, 1971.
Hoyt, Clement. Storm of Stars: The Collected Poems and Essays of Clement Hoyt (1906-1970). Baton Rouge, LA: Green World, 1976.
Kacian, Jim, Editor. Frogpond XX Supplement 1997: The Second Haiku International Association—Haiku Society of America Joint Haiku Conference, April 19-20, 1997 in Tokyo. New York: Haiku Society of America, 1997.
Kato, Shuichi. Translated by David Chibbet. A History of Japanese Literature: The First Thousand Years. New York: Kodansha International, 1981.
Kawamoto, Koji. The Poetics of Japanese Verse. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 2000. Originally published in Japanese as Nihon Shiika no Dentô by Iwanami Shoten in 1991.
Keene, Donald. The Winter Sun Shines In: A Life of Masoaka Shiki. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 2013.
Lanoue, David G. Pure Land Haiku: The Art of Priest Issa. Reno, NV & Tokyo: Buddhist Books International, 2005.
Lucas, Martin. Stepping Stones: A Way Into Haiku. Essex, UK: British Haiku Society, 2007.
Miner, Earl. Translated by Earl Miner and Robert H. Brower. An Introduction to Japanese Court Poetry. Standford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1968.
Miner, Earl. Editor and translator. Japanese Poetic Diaries. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1969.
Missias, A.C., Editor. In Due Season: A Discussion of the Role of Kigo in English-language Haiku. Philadelphia, PA: Redfox Press, 2000.
Modern Haiku Association [Gendai Haiku Kyôkai]. Proceedings of the First International Contemporary Haiku Symposium. Tokyo: Gendai Haiku Kyôkai, 1999.
Nakagawa, Atsuo. Studies in English Haiku. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1976.
Sato, Hiroaki. One Hundred Frogs from Renga to Haiku to English. New York: Weatherhill, 1983.
Shirane, Haruo and Tomi Suzuki, Editors. Inventing the Classics: Modernity, National Identity, and Japanese Literature. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2002.
Shirane, Haruo. Traces of Dreams: Landscape, Cultural Memory, and the Poetry of Bashô. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998.
Spiess, Robert. A Year’s Speculations on Haiku. Madison, WI: Modern Haiku, 1995.
Stryk, Lucien. Encounter With Zen: Writings on Poetry and Zen. Athens, OH: Swallow Press and Ohio University Press, 1981.
Swede, George. The Modern English Haiku. Toronto, Ontario: Columbine Editions, 1981.
Tohta, Kaneko. The Future of Haiku. Winchester, VA: Red Moon Press, 2011. Translated from the Japanese by the Kon Nichi Translation Group, Kumamoto University.
Tohta, Kaneko. Ikemonofûei: Poetic Composition on Living Things. Winchester, VA: Red Moon Press, 2011. Translated from the Japanese by the Kon Nichi Translation Group, Kumamoto University.
Ueda, Makoto, Bashô and His Interpreters: Selected Hokku with Commentary. Standford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992.
Ueda, Makoto. Literary and Art Theories in Japan. Ann Arbor, MI: Center for Japanese Studies, the University of Michigan, 1991.
Ueda, Makoto, Matsuo Bashô. Tokyo & New York: Kodansha International Ltd, 1982.
Ueda, Makoto, The Path of Flowering Thorn: The Life and Poetry of Yosa Buson. Standford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998.
Williams, Paul O. The Nick of Time: Essays on Haiku Aesthetics. Foster City, CA: Press Here, 2001.
Yasuda, Kenneth. The Japanese Haiku: Its Essential Nature, History, and Possibilities in English, with Selected Examples. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1957.
Zheng, Jianqing, Editor. The Other World of Richard Wright: Perspectives on His Haiku. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2011.

Teaching Haiku & Poet’s Craft Books

The following books address the how-to of haiku — how to teach, how to compose, how to revise. Beginners typically rely on one or more of these texts as they compose and rework their own haiku. The first such primer in English was Sadakichi Hartmann’s Tanka and Haikai: Japanese Rhythms (1916). One early handbook that emphasized a Zen approach to writing haiku was Eric Amann’s the wordless poem (1969). The first widely available resource that focused on craft was Jean Calkins’s Handbook on Haiku and Other Form Poems (1970), followed by Betty Drevniok’s Aware — a haiku primer (1971) and Joan Giroux’s The Haiku Form (1974).

William J. Higginson and Penny Harter’s The Haiku Handbook has been the most influential resource of this kind since its original publication in 1985 and is now also available in a 25th anniversary edition. This text provides a good general summary of classical Japanese haiku and the early evolution of the genre in English before setting out guidelines for the teaching and learning of haiku craft. The reference section includes an extensive list of season-words, a glossary of terms, and bibliography.

Among the other books, Lee Gurga’s Haiku: A Poet’s Guide, Bruce Ross’s How to Haiku, explore haiku craft in ways that build on Higginson and foster the transition from beginner to experienced practice. Related online resources on teaching beginners or focused on the poet’s craft include several kigo databases, such as the World Kigo Database maintained by Dr. Gabi Greve, and Jim Kacian’s First Thoughts: A Haiku Primer.

British Haiku Society. Haiku Kit: A Teaching Pack, Second Edition. Braintree, Essex, UK: British Haiku Society, 1998.
Carter, Terry Ann, Editor. Lighting the Global Lantern: A Teacher’s Guide to Writing Haiku and Related Literary Forms. Township of South Frontenac, Ontario, Canada: Wintergreen Studios Press, 2011.
Digregorio, Charlotte. Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All. Winnetka, IL: Artful Communicators Press, 2014.
Drevniok, Betty. Aware — A Haiku Primer. Bellingham, WA: Portals Publications, 1981.
England, Gerald, Editor. The Art of Haiku 2000: A Guide to Haiku, Senryu, Tanka, Haibun, Renga, Sedoka, Sijo and related genres. Cheshire, UK: New Hope International, 2000.
Giroux, Joan. The Haiku Form. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1974.
Gurga, Lee. Haiku: A Poet’s Guide. Lincoln, IL: Modern Haiku Press, 2003.
Haiku Society of America Education Committee. Haiku Resources Packet for Teachers, 2nd Edition. New York: Haiku Society of America, 1999. [Includes British Haiku Society Teacher’s Kit, Frogpond 22.2, Haiku Compass, The Classic Tradition of Haiku Anthology, and The Haiku Habit Workshop.] Higginson, William J. The Haiku Handbook: How to Write, Share, and Teach Haiku. New York: Kodansha International, 1985.
Reichhold, Jane. Writing and Enjoying Haiku: A Hands-on Guide. Tokyo, New York, London: Kodansha International, 2002.
Ross, Bruce. How to Haiku: A Writer’s Guide to Haiku and Related Forms. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 2002.
Wakan, Naomi. Haiku: One Breath Poetry. Torrance, C A: Heian International, 1993.

A Haiku Scholar’s Anthologies

The following noteworthy anthologies are recommended for a haiku scholar to know in order to understand the current diversity and breadth of the global haiku community. These anthologies embrace haiku as a literary tradition worthy of study and provide high-quality examples that continue to resonate through multiple readings. In order to be well read, a haiku scholar must read and study multiple anthologies, rather than rely on one seemingly canonical work.

Whereas in Japanese haiku culture and anthologies there are identified “haiku masters,” the contemporary global haiku community has been resistant to identify poets that everyone should follow as masters of the art. Certain poets are widely recognized as quality contributors, but not raised to the level of veneration nor emulation. Perhaps this resistance to identify new “masters” has contributed to the challenge of creating a coherent body of criticism—there is a lack of critical commentary on individual poets and their contributions aesthetically and communally.

The global haiku community is made up of numerous active sub-communities. These sub-communities have their own traditions and historical paths through which they connect and exchange ideas and aesthetic approaches. The anthologies included in this bibliography provide some of the best haiku, excellent critical commentary and access to different approaches. Some, such as the Midwest Haiku Anthology, The British Museum Haiku, and Indian Haiku: A Bilingual Anthology of 105 Poets from India represent large communities, while others like Cor van den Heuvel’s The Haiku Anthology have historical significance. R.H. Blyth’s Haiku volumes, a first encounter with haiku for many English-language haiku poets, allow poets and researchers who cannot read or speak Japanese to read and experience haiku and writers beyond their time and place. Meanwhile Makoto Ueda’s anthologies often include scholarly introductions to help readers with historical and cultural awareness. Each contributes something to a larger understanding, and claims to fill some gap that is missing from other anthologies, whether it be historically or aesthetic differences.

The anthologies in this bibliography do not attempt to establish a canon. Anthologies were included for high quality or literary value that expands haiku as a literary art. Therefore, some types of anthologies have been excluded. Society and club anthologies that offer inclusion based on membership, while a strong representation of a community, often fluctuate in quality and have not been included. Also thematic collections of haiku can be literary and interesting, but do not typically expand a scholarly understanding of the art. An exception to thematic collections is Baseball Haiku: The Best Haiku Ever Written About the Game as it includes and provides a cultural bridge between Japanese and American writers. Other topical anthologies, such as cat haiku, zombie haiku or pop culture collections, fall into the category of zappai, which are often 5-7-5 and value entertainment and comedy over literary quality. This bibliography also excludes translations that are derivative and/or have poor aesthetic judgement, as these do not properly represent the poems they are attempting to showcase.

Barlow, John and Martin Lucas, Editors. The New Haiku. Liverpool, England: Snapshot Press, 2002. <www. snapshotpress.co.uk>
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Edo Satirical Verse Anthologies. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1961. Second printing, 1977.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Haiku: Volume 1, Eastern Culture. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1949. Twenty-third printing, 1976.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Haiku: Volume 2, Spring. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1950. Seventeenth printing, 1976.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Haiku: Volume 3, Summer-Autumn. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1952. Seventeenth printing, 1976.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Haiku: Volume 4, Autumn-Winter. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1952. Sixteenth printing, 1977.
Blyth, R.H., Translator. Senryu: Japanese Satirical Verses. Tokyo, Japan: Hokuseido Press, 1949.
Borrell, Nola & Karen Peterson Butterworth, Editors. the taste of nashi. Wellington: Windrift Haiku Group, 2008.
Brooks, Randy and George Swede, Editors. Global Haiku: Twenty-five Poets World Wide. Oakville, Ontario: Mosaic Press, 2000. [Iron Press edition in UK.] Brooks, Randy & Lee Gurga, Editors. Midwest Haiku Anthology. Decatur, IL: High/Coo Press, 1992.
Brooks, Randy & Emily Evans, Melanie McLay, Rick Bearce, Editors. Millikin University Haiku Anthology. Decatur, IL: Bronze Man Books, October 2008.
Burns, Allan, Editor. Montage: The Book. Winchester, VA: Red Moon Press, 2010.
Burns, Allan, Editor. Where the River Goes: The Nature Tradition in English-language Haiku. United Kingdom: Snapshot Press, 2013.
Carter, Stephen D. Traditional Japanese Poetry: An Anthology. Stanford, CA: Stanford Unviersity Press, 1993.
Childs, Cyril, Editor. New Zealand Haiku Anthology. Wellington: New Zealand Poetry Society, 1993.
Childs, Cyril, Editor. The Second New Zealand Haiku Anthology. Wellington: New Zealand Poetry Society, 1998.
Cobb, David, Editor. The British Museum Haiku. London, UK: British Museum Press, 2002.
Cobb, David & Martin Lucas, Editors. The Iron Book of British Haiku. North Shields, Northumberland: Iron Press, 1998.
de Cristoforo, Violet Kazue, Editor and Translator. May Sky, There is Always Tomorrow: An Anthology of Japanese American Concentration Camp Kaiko Haiku. Los Angeles, CA: Sun & Moon Press, 1997.
Deodhar, Angelee, Editor. Indian Haiku: A Bilingual Anthology of Haiku by 105 Poets from India. Chandigarh, India: Azad Hind Stores, Ltd., 2008. [Hindi & English.] Gendai Haiku Kyokai [Modern Haiku Association]. The Haiku Universe for the 21st Century: Japanese Haiku 2008. Tokyo: Modern Haiku Association, 2008.
Gurga, Lee and Scott Metz. Haiku 21: An Anthology of Contemporary English-language Haiku. Lincoln, IL: Modern Haiku Press, 2011.
Hass, Robert, Editor. The Essential Haiku: Versions of Bashō, Buson & Issa. Hopewell, NJ: Ecco Press, 1994.
Hoffman, Yoel. Japanese Death Poems Written by Zen Monks and Haiku Poets on the Verge of Death. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1986.
Howard, Dorothy & André Duhaime, Editors. Haiku: Canadian Anthology. Hull, Quebec: Editions Asticou, 1985.
Jenkins, Nigel, Ken Jones, & Lynne Rees, Editors. Another Country: Haiku Poetry from Wales. Llandysul, Ceredigion, UK: Gomer Press, 2011.
Kacian, Jim, Editor with Philip Rowland and Allan Burns. Haiku in English: The First Hundred Years. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2013.
Kacian, Jim, Editor. The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku from Red Moon Press publish haiku and related essays selected by a board of editors. At this time, these anthologies have featured work from 1996 through 2014.
Katô, Kôko, Editor. A Hidden Pond: Anthology of Modern Haiku, 2nd edition. Translated by Kôko Katô and David Burleigh. Tokyo: Kadokawa Shoten, 2003.
Kudryavitsky, Anatoly. Bamboo Dreams: An Anthology of Haiku Poetry from Ireland. Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland: Doghouse, 2012.
Miyamori, Asatarô, Editor and Translator. Classic Haiku: An Anthology of Poems by Bashô and His Followers. Mineoloa, NY: Dover Books, 2002. [Reprint of materials selected from An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern, originally published by Maruzen Company Ltd., Tokyo, in 1932.] Miyashita, Emiko, Editor and Translator. The New Pond: An English-language Haiku Anthology. Tokyo: Hokumei-sha, 2002.
Ross, Bruce, Editor. Haiku Moment: An Anthology of Contemporary North American Haiku. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1993.
Stewart, Harold. Editor and translator. A Chime of Windbells: A Year of Japanese Haiku in English Verse. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.
Stewart, Harold. Editor and translator. A Net of Fireflies: An Anthology of 320 Japanese Haiku in English Verse. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1960.
Swede, George and Randy Brooks, Editors. Global Haiku: Twenty-five Poets World Wide. Oakville, Ontario: Mosaic Press, 2000. [Iron Press edition in UK.] Ueda, Makoto. Editor and translator. Far Beyond the Field: Haiku by Japanese Women. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.
Ueda, Makoto. Editor and translator. Light Verse from the Floating World: An Anthology of Premodern Japanese Senryu. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.
Ueda, Makoto. Editor and translator. Modern Japanese Haiku: An Anthology. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1976.
Van den Heuvel, Cor , Editor. Baseball Haiku: The Best Haiku Ever Written About the Game. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2007.
Van den Heuvel, Cor, Editor. The Haiku Anthology. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1974.
Van den Heuvel, Cor, Editor. The Haiku Anthology, Revised Edition. New York: Touchstone, 1986.
Van den Heuvel, Cor, Editor. The Haiku Anthology. New York, NY: Norton, 1999.

Online Haiku Resources

Decatur Haiku Collection
Haiku NewZ Archived Articles
Nick Virgilio Poetry Project
The Haiku Foundation Haiku Bibliography
The Haiku Foundation Digital Library
The Haiku Foundation Education Resources
American Haiku Archives
Greve, Dr. Gabi World Kigo Database
Kacian, Jim First Thoughts: A Haiku Primer

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