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Per Diem/Haiku of the Day for August 2022: Early Harvest

Per Diem/Haiku of the Day for August 2022 features Guest Editor Kathleen Tice’s collection on the theme of Early Harvest. This is what Kathleen has to say by way of introduction to this theme:

August 1 is often recognized as “early harvest” on the Christian Calendar, or Lammas, meaning ‘Loaf Mass Day.’ August marks the beginning of laying up food for the long winter months ahead. It is a time for showing gratitude to the Earth for the great abundance it provides. Those who have a “green thumb” and our blessed farmers are in the process of gathering-in the fruits of their labors. It is also a time to reflect on the many aspects of our own personal lives. Perhaps our earnest endeavors have reached a peak and now we are ready to reap the benefits. When you evaluate your life, consider it with the heart of a farmer.

after the house fire . . .
how reluctantly I eat
the last heirloom tomato

—Kathleen Tice

This Post Has 14 Comments

  1. A different kind of harvesting, one equally organised by bees, and humans! 🙂

    .

    Atlas foothills…
    bees jostle pickers
    for saffron

    Alan Summers
    Haiku Dialogue series:
    A Sense of Place: MOUNTAIN – hearing ed kjmunro
    (August 2018)

    .
    In Morocco the saffron is harvested between October through to December whenever the six-petalled flowers appear.

  2. Winter grants Fall’s wish
    for an encore flower dance,
    frost procrastinates.

    Summer’s warmth lingers.
    Harvest-in, farmer’s delight-
    Sweet whispers of thanks.

    Winter winds whistling
    Indian Summer’s last stance
    Bowing gracefully

  3. Dear Kathleen Tice,

    Wonderful selection so far!

    .
    Today’s haiku:

    .

    windrowed alfalfa—
    I awaken to the scent
    of a first cutting

    —Judith Schallberger

    A fantastic natural history haiku, enjoyed looking up ecosia’s search engine to learn more about that fab opening word “windrowed”! 🙂

    ECOSIA (they plant a tree when we search) “windrowed” results:
    https://www.ecosia.org/search?method=index&q=windrowed

    .

    I’m also reminded of this haiku published in Modern Haiku several decades ago but still carries the weight of a finely crafted haiku:

    .

    Keening chinook winds
    and rotting snow windrows —
    That noisy old crow.

    Kathryn K. Ahlstrand

    .

    And of course I must mention the editor’s own haiku on this page:

    .
    after the house fire . . .
    how reluctantly I eat
    the last heirloom tomato

    —Kathleen Tice

    .
    A wonderful fused feeling of both hokku and haiku, nature and natural history.

    .
    I am loving this month so much! 🙂

    warm regards,
    Alan

    1. re:

      full granary
      winter schedule
      steady in smooth flow

      I wonder about:

      full granary
      the steady smooth flow
      of a winter schedule

      the steady flow
      of a winter schedule
      full granary

      winter journal
      the steady smooth flow
      of a full granary

      1. Dear esteemed poet,
        Greetings,

        I wonder about:

        full granary
        the steady smooth flow
        of a winter schedule

        the steady flow
        of a winter schedule
        full granary

        winter journal
        the steady smooth flow
        of a full granary

        All the three are fine, still I like the most , the following: always appreciating your inspiring notes and suggestions.

        winter journal
        the steady smooth flow
        of a full granary

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