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HAIKU DIALOGUE – bike

 

Welcome to Haiku Dialogue

Let’s talk about haiku! You are invited to respond to photographs – I will share a photo each week as a prompt for your writing…

Submit an original unpublished poem via our Contact Form by Saturday midnight on the theme of the week, including your name as you would like it to appear, and place of residence.

Please note that by submitting, you agree that your work may appear in the column – neither acknowledgment nor acceptance emails will be sent. All communication about the poems that are posted in the column will be added as blog comments.

Poems will be selected based on the potential to generate discussion – these poems will be the best to talk about…

next week’s theme:

The deadline for this theme is midnight Pacific Time, Saturday 06 July 2019.

I look forward to reading your submissions.

 

HAIKU DIALOGUE:  bike

Here are my selections for this week:

early spring
before the old hut
a flowers cart

Agus Maulana Sunjaya

 

abandoned
vendor’s trike…
dying flowers

Al Gallia
Lafayette, Louisiana USA

 

parked bike –
old florist arranges
her garden

Aljoša Vuković
Šibenik, Croatia

 

the old bike –
his grandmother still plants
his medical herbs

Angela Giordano
Italy

 

no moon night –
the gardener brings home
so many fireflies

arvinder kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

summers end
grandma stops by
with a flat

Barbara Tate

 

enclosed courtyard
open carriage going nowhere
everywhere

Charles Harmon
Los Angeles, California, USA

 

paperboy
retired to the
herb garden

Constance Bourg
Belgium

 

trimming
the grocery list –
garden sale

Debbie Scheving
Bremerton WA

 

in my elder days
I ride a tricycle
once again

Dubravka Šćukanec
Zagreb, Croatia

 

last stop:
a red flower before leaving

Giuliana Ravaglia

 

retired delivery bike
spring sunlight
through rusty spokes

Greer Woodward
Waimea, HI

 

leaving the gallery
cross-hatched in shadow
and light

Helen Buckingham

 

third age –
new horizons
for a faithful friend

Ingrid Baluchi
Ohrid, Macedonia

 

new growth
the seasons turn
through spokes of light

john hawkhead

 

bicycle wagon
the plants
have my back

Laurie Greer
Washington DC

 

widow’s yard
a rusty old tricycle
blooms

Lucy Whitehead
Essex, UK

 

flea market –
all my plans
for the spring garden

Madhuri Pillai

 

slow travel
unexpected
growth

Margaret Walker

 

tricycle
she takes the playground
with her

Marilyn Ashbaugh

 

out my window the multi-colored streak of a passing garden

Mark Meyer

 

in the yard
waiting for you
flowers for planting

Nadejda Kostadinova
Bulgaria

 

behind iron lace
he brings her
punnets of strawberries

nancy liddle
broken hill, Australia

 

old bicycle
all my mother’s memories
on spring

Neni Rusliana
Indonesia

 

assisted living
he still brings her flowers
each day

Pris Campbell

 

kitchen garden
my tricycle
my pride

Radhamani sarma

 

the invisible fellows
attending our lives
garden flowers

Radostina Dragostinova
Bulgaria

 

peddling into the wind
bees hold tight
to the flowers

Rehn Kovacic

 

retired rickshaw
flowers in place
of passengers

Rich Schilling
Webster Groves, MO

 

retirement bash –
the jade sculptor’s
rested tools

Robert Kingston

 

unclaimed bike –
the pink flowers belong
to everyone

robyn brooks
usa

 

all day planting flowers
filling the holes
of depression

Ronald K. Craig
Batavia, OH USA

 

in front of the house
red flowers on a bike…
a gentle touch

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

searching for
a breath of fresh air
urban sprawl

Sandi Pray
St. John’s, Fl.

 

between green handlebars
and the flat tires
red petals blooming

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY

 

writer’s block
the symmetry
in the overlook

simonj
UK

 

modern times
the flowers on
a tourist trip

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

flowers outside the building
the door open
to new beginnings

Stephen A. Peters

 

basket
of flowers for my mom
her headstone

Susan Bonk Plumridge
London, Canada

 

you ride with roses
pedaling into spring
petal after petal

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, CA USA

 

watering
her favorite flowerpot
grandson’s old bicycle

Tomislav Sjekloća
Cetinje, Montenegro

 

rental cottage
floral scents revive
a memory

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio USA

 

courtyard
echoes of the soft footfall
of nostalgia

Vandana Parashar

 

the sculptor’s cart in repose
once cradled
his alabaster stones

Vicki Miko

 

homeless
papercup water home
to the broken flower

wendy c. bialek
prescott valley, arizona usa

 

morning sun peeking
through the threshold
forget me not

X3+us the Whale

 

ethno house –
lacy windows and flower tricycle
breathe a new life

Zdenka Mlinar
Zagreb, Croatia

 

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019).

 

This Post Has 73 Comments

  1. Thank you so much for including my haiku. I especially enjoyed Arvinder Kaur’s fireflies, so evocative and Angela Giordano’s medicinal herbs, such a story there 🙂

  2. Thank you, Kathy, for including my poem! I love the image prompts!

    no moon night –
    the gardener brings home
    so many fireflies
    arvinder kaur
    Chandigarh, India
    arvinder kaur’s poem is lovely to visualize and to say out loud!


    summers end
    grandma stops by
    with a flat
    Barbara Tate
    For me, Barbara Tate’s poem brings anticipation or wish that the story be continued!


    trimming
    the grocery list –
    garden sale
    Debbie Scheving
    Bremerton WA
    Debbie Scheving’s poem gives a perfect picture of sharing an abundant bumper crop. Or maybe enticing a customer with a little added surprise!


    leaving the gallery
    cross-hatched in shadow
    and light
    Helen Buckingham
    Helen Buckingham’s poem gives a pleasing and artistic sense of what we’d see on the inside of the “gallery”. Beautiful!


    bicycle wagon
    the plants
    have my back
    Laurie Greer
    Washington DC
    Laurie Greer’s poem gives me a portrait of a small business owner with a green thumb.


    widow’s yard
    a rusty old tricycle
    blooms
    Lucy Whitehead
    Essex, UK
    Lucy Whitehead’s poem is beautifully simple and apropos to the image!


    slow travel
    unexpected
    growth
    Margaret Walker
    Margaret Walker’s poem is only four words, yet it describes the tricycle and its fate perfectly!


    tricycle
    she takes the playground
    with her
    Marilyn Ashbaugh
    Marilyn Ashbaugh’s poem brings back a magical childhood memory!


    out my window the multi-colored streak of a passing garden
    Mark Meyer
    Mark Meyer’s poem is a vivid motion picture!


    behind iron lace
    he brings her
    punnets of strawberries
    nancy liddle
    broken hill, Australia
    nancy liddle’s poem is the start of a romantic novel waiting to unfold.


    kitchen garden
    my tricycle
    my pride
    Radhamani sarma
    Radhamani’s poem gives me a sense of delight! Maybe the tricycle was acquired or purchased from the sale of the fruits of your carefully cultivated garden? You are beaming!


    retirement bash –
    the jade sculptor’s
    rested tools
    Robert Kingston
    Robert Kingston’s poem, yes, reflects some of my thoughts!


    writer’s block
    the symmetry
    in the overlook
    simonj
    UK
    simonj’s true depiction of the image. So many parts to the picture, what catches my eye first, what will I focus on, what will I leave out?!


    watering
    her favorite flowerpot
    grandson’s old bicycle
    Tomislav Sjekloća
    Cetinje, Montenegro
    Tomislav Sjekloća’s poem reminds me of my grandma’s garden surrounding her back yard. My brother’s toy dump truck, perfectly oxidized and my ceramic Easter bunny pot overgrown with purslane.


    courtyard
    echoes of the soft footfall
    of nostalgia
    Vandana Parashar
    Vandana Parashar’s poem is so lovely, the musicality in “echoes of the soft footfall”


    morning sun peeking
    through the threshold
    forget me not
    X3+us the Whale
    X3+us, A dreamy poem nice to say out loud!

    1. thank you for liking my poem – i think the romantic novel is already on your sleeve with your heart <3
      nancy

  3. peddling into the wind
    bees hold tight
    to the flowers

    Rehn Kovacic

    an image to behold! thank you, Rehn.

  4. thank you for including my poem with your picks, kj,

    however, the space is intentional….
    so it should read as follows:

    homeless
    papercup water home
    to the broken flower

    wendy c. bialek
    prescott valley, arizona usa

    1. i see the break appears to close itself….
      so then it will have to go in as:

      homeless
      papercup water… home
      to the broken flower

      wendy c. bialek
      prescott valley, arizona usa

      1. Wendy – so sorry I missed this – it was correct in the plain text version, but somehow WordPress just removes those spaces! However, thanks to Craig, I have learned how to make spaces – & I have corrected this now…
        thanks again, Craig!

        1. thanks for your joint efforts, kj and craig….perhaps you can share this fix and it could be applied when/ at the time of submission/posting to the form?

          1. oh Wendy thanks for this, but it’s a WordPress thing… some formatting has to be added back… but I appreciate the thought!

  5. Thanks to everyone for kind comments and fabulous haiku, and thank to kj for these stimulating marriages of images and words. If anyone wants to read a brilliant novel that features bicycles, do try Flann O’Brien’s “The Third Policeman” – it’s an absolute classic in terms of comedic fantasy!

  6. Thank you editor for publishing my haiku and I look forward to our further cooperation. Also, congratulations everybody!

  7. Thanks Debbie, Alan, Helen and Laurie for you nice comments!
    My favorites this week:
    .
    basket
    of flowers for my mom
    her headstone
    Susan Bonk
    .
    Our moms deserve flowers before and after death. A basket of flowers reveals the depth of our love and caring. Nice poem, Susan.
    .
    peddling into the wind
    bees hold tight
    to the flowers
    Rehn Kovacic
    .
    I can vividly see the bees hanging on for dear life, even the grimaces on their bee faces not knowing when the “ride” will stop. Thanks for the smiles, Rehn.
    .
    old bicycle
    all my mother’s memories
    on spring
    Neni Rusliana
    .
    Prior to my mom’s dementia we would sit for hours reminiscing events. So many were happy. Earlier in life my grandmother would sit with me and review events of past summers I spent with her, picnics, parades, fairs. Past recollections bolster future expectations. Thanks for the memories, Neni.
    .
    out my window the multi-colored streak of a passing garden
    Mark Meyer
    .
    I assume this is a one sentence poem – a break in lines would weaken the image of “streak!” Anyway, a comical view that made me smile, and smile again. Thanks, Mark.
    .
    widow’s yard
    a rusty old tricycle
    blooms
    Lucy Whitehead
    .
    Overcoming the death of a loved one takes time, but here the widow has found a way to bring a touch of color back into her life. Nice image, Lucy.
    .
    new growth
    the seasons turn
    through spokes of light
    john hawkhead
    .
    I don’t want to “analyze” this poem; it’s simply a beautiful image that will stick with me all week. Thanks, John.
    .
    retired delivery bike
    spring sunlight
    through rusty spokes
    Greer Woodward
    .
    Yes, I noticed the flat tire also! We can find beauty in things and people despite gloom, apparent lack of usefulness and rust. Nice poem, Greer.
    .
    summer’s end
    grandma stops by
    with a flat
    Barbara Tate
    .
    At least she reached the end of her summer before the tire blew! And she gets to spend time with “me” due to this “unfortunate” event! I chose to see humor in this poem although one might presume a darker connotation. Thanks, Barbara.
    .
    Thanks, kj, for this second round of thoughtful pictures that stimulate our creativity!
    Ron
    .

  8. Welcome back Kathy, as usual a great selection of haiku, thank you for publishing mine. Enjoyed reading Alan Summer’s and Laurie Greer’s comments. Oh Alan, sorry to hear about the fleas 😊.

  9. all day planting flowers
    filling the holes
    of depression
    .
    Ronald K. Craig
    .
    Some things just jump out at me…
    .
    planting flowers
    all day filling the holes
    of depression
    .
    I think this word order has a greater separation of joy and sadness, heightening the experience. Or, if the general dullness of senses is the desired effect, just combine the final two lines into one.
    .
    all day planting flowers
    filling the holes of depression

  10. Selecting one from so many quality haiku is always a challenge.
    John’s one this week created a stir. Leaving me with a feeling of freshness and renewal as we move from spring to summer.

    new growth
    the seasons turn
    through spokes of light

    john hawkhead

  11. behind iron lace
    he brings her
    punnets of strawberries
    .
    nancy liddle
    .
    The beautiful window grills? caught my eye when I first saw the photo, and can anyone share what the little signs say? Loved the romantic image of baskets of berries and a lacey wrought iron fence.
    .
    courtyard
    echos of the soft footfall
    of nostalgia
    .
    Vandana Parashar
    .
    This one moved me.
    .
    the sculptor’s cart in repose
    once cradled
    his alabaster stones
    .
    Vicki Miko
    .
    The history and image is a surprising contrast to the more fragile plants.
    .
    Ron Craig’s “…filling the holes….” is relatable as I use gardening as therapy. Thus the need to trim the grocery budget.

    1. Thank you, Debbie, for your thoughtful comment!
      I too noticed the filigree windows, each different, perhaps a sculptor’s showcase of work now a historical landmark. Maybe the “little signs” name and describe the sculptor’s inspiration behind each window.

      1. Debbie, Vicki, nancy – I believe those windows are called leak windows – this photo was taken at Dr. Sun Yat-Sen garden in Vancouver, a classical Chinese garden (after the Haiku Canada Weekend last May a group of us went there) – absolutely beautiful!

        1. Thanks for that info, kjmunro! It would be interesting to know the origin of the name. Chinese garden house sundrops leak in stenciled patterns.

  12. thanks to all for the warm welcome back! I enjoyed my “time off”, & accomplished a lot, but it is wonderful to be reading all your poems again, & especially seeing so many familiar names, & new names too…
    thanks, as always, to Alan Summers, & to Laurie Greer, & all who have commented so far…
    I particularly like the variety of responses – how poets veer off in different directions – Lucy Whitehead’s ‘widow’s yard’ which adds a layer of meaning to the image; the possible financial implications of the flea market & the grocery list, the rusty spokes & spokes of light, depression, writer’s block, a playground, assisted living, & a headstone, among many others…
    I also thought that Barbara Tate’s ‘flat’ could refer to a flat of bedding plants…
    looking forward to next week!

    1. Dear Kathy.
      Thank you for including mine.
      I look forward to your future photo prompts.

    2. Yep! I saw a flat of flowers and a flat tire–both jumped right out at me… So happy you’re back

    3. Dear Kathy –
      Welcome back!
      I am truly honored that you included my haiku. Thank you😌
      Congratulations to all of the poets!

  13. Dear Kathy,
    Profound thanks for including mine,. Reading all the wonderful writes. Here is my favorite, stemming from her keen observation, taking us all around as well.

    tricycle
    she takes the playground
    with her

    Marilyn Ashbaugh

  14. Thank you so much Alan for the comment. I went over this pic with a magnifying glass–the flat tire jumped right out at me. Thank you Kathy and so happy to be back in the fold.

    1. Hi Barbara,
      .
      I love all kinds of haiku, and not just minimalist ones, but your tight composition, with bags of wonderful white space/negative space leapt out at me! 🙂
      .
      .
      summers end
      grandma stops by
      with a flat
      .
      Barbara Tate
      .
      .
      Ah, yes, photo prompts are always worth looking at by zooming in as well, and also “looking behind” the photo or frame. Kudos! 🙂

  15. Thanks for the appreciation, Alan. And thanks so much, Katherine, for selecting my ku. A fine collection with which to kick-off your return!
    .
    Love Rich Schilling’s…..has a vaguely funereal feel:
    .
    retired rickshaw
    flowers in place
    of passengers
    .
    .
    Ronald K. Craig’s heartfelt:
    .
    all day planting flowers
    filling the holes
    of depression
    .
    brings to mind this of mine:
    .
    chocolate cosmos
    filling a hole
    for now
    .
    –FemkuMag, 7, December 2018
    .
    …..distraught minds dig alike!

    1. Ah yes, the holes in us and in time.
      .
      .
      As a former Bristol resident, you would have seen lots of Brittany French onion sellers crossing from Europe into Bristol and other places! 🙂
      .
      .
      two boys giggle
      as he enters the bike shop…
      the onion seller
      .
      Alan Summers
      Stepping Stones:  a way into haiku ed. Martin Lucas (British Haiku Society 2007)

    2. Thanks Helen! Now that you say it, it does sort of read like a funeral for the rickshaw.

  16. thanks, kj, for this richly suggestive photo–it’s always hard to know what detail to focus on. I love the range of responses: we all saw a different picture. Like too many comment on all, but here are few that jumped out–

    no moon night –
    the gardener brings home
    so many fireflies

    arvinder kaur
    Chandigarh, India

    *
    i love the firefly touch–of course! But hadn’t thought of it myself.
    *
    retired delivery bike
    spring sunlight
    through rusty spokes

    Greer Woodward
    Waimea, HI

    *
    wonderful perspective–the spokes! and nature making things new
    *
    third age –
    new horizons
    for a faithful friend

    Ingrid Baluchi
    Ohrid, Macedonia

    *
    full of warmth and a touch of poignancy–this is just beautiful, and nice reference to the three wheels with the third age. Works so well all around!
    *
    new growth
    the seasons turn
    through spokes of light

    john hawkhead

    another spokes-person! so rich in many kinds of cycles
    *
    widow’s yard
    a rusty old tricycle
    blooms

    Lucy Whitehead
    Essex, UK

    *
    always new life–love the beauty and hopefulness of this
    *
    slow travel
    unexpected
    growth

    Margaret Walker
    *
    great–we all need to slow down
    *
    tricycle
    she takes the playground
    with her

    Marilyn Ashbaugh
    *
    love this one too–and another great uses of the three wheels–“bike” wouldn’t accomplish what “tricycle” does with all its associations with childhood
    *
    out my window the multi-colored streak of a passing garden

    Mark Meyer
    *
    love the “passing garden”–here passing in several ways
    *
    assisted living
    he still brings her flowers
    each day

    Pris Campbell

    *
    flowers are one of the best assists to living!
    *
    all day planting flowers
    filling the holes
    of depression

    Ronald K. Craig
    Batavia, OH USA

    *
    here, too–flowers as healers
    *

    1. Thank you, Laurie. Appreciating all your comments – on mine as well as on other poems. I didn’t think of third age tying up with three wheels in your sense; simply an old tricycle reaching the ‘third age’ and its possible continued usefulness. Maybe I had U3A (University of the Third Age) in mind!
      It’s a wonderful learning process understanding how we each view the work chosen, and how much this broadens out the subject/photo prompt with all the variety of responses offered.
      Thank you kj for this exciting new start again, and for choosing one of mine.

    2. Laurie, thank you for commenting on my “slow travel”. It is so fascinating to see the different interpretations of a single photo.

  17. Enjoy the short film Bicycle (Jitensha) which was premiered in my part of England in a joint city Japanese arts festival that I was co-director:
    https://www.viddsee.com/video/noodle-deli/0mxdt?

    .
    .

    Also who can forget Syd Barret’s Bike song when he was still with Pink Floyd!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBCctL88dRk
    .
    .

    As per usual, a lot of excellent work on the theme of the photograph:
    .
    .

     
    no moon night –
    the gardener brings home
    so many fireflies
    .
    arvinder kaur
    Chandigarh, India
    .
    .
    Love ‘no moon’ night! And the gardener bringing home ‘so many’ fireflies’ What a gorgeous phrase to go with the first line.
    .
    .

     
    summers end
    grandma stops by
    with a flat
    .
    Barbara Tate
    .
    .
    Well spotted, it’s a flat tire! 🙂 I love that two line phrase after the opening line. Both sections of the haiku suggest so much within its negative/white space. Love it! 🙂
    .
    .
     

     
    last stop:
    a red flower before leaving
    .
    Giuliana Ravaglia
    .
    .
    It’s not as easy as it appears to accomplish a good two line haiku in English. This succeeds beautifully! 🙂 Packed with gorgeous negative space rather than defaulting to an overlong second/last line, this is quite briliant! 🙂
    .
    .

     
    leaving the gallery
    cross-hatched in shadow
    and light
    .
    Helen Buckingham
    .
    .
    Lots of light, visuals, and atmosphere! 🙂
    .
    .
     
    new growth
    the seasons turn
    through spokes of light
    .
    john hawkhead
    .
    .
    Beautiful, with a stunning last line!
    .
    .

     
    bicycle wagon
    the plants
    have my back
    .
    Laurie Greer
    Washington DC
    .
    .
    Brilliant! Those last two lines pack a punch beyond their mere count of five.
    .
    .
     
    widow’s yard
    a rusty old tricycle
    blooms
    .
    Lucy Whitehead
    Essex, UK
    .
    .
    A fresh and original opening line. I can imagine an enclave of widows looking after each other and refreshing the flowers on that bicycle.
    .
    .
     
    flea market –
    all my plans
    for the spring garden
    .
    Madhuri Pillai
    .
    .
    I remember my first flea market in a part of London. I might have even caught a few when I went into a side shop of old men’s clothes. 🙂 Lovely haiku!
    .
    .

     
    slow travel
    unexpected
    growth
    .
    Margaret Walker
    .
    .
    Works brilliantly well with the photograph! On its own I can imagine someone deciding to make a life-changing holiday, at a slow pace, not rushing each place they visit.
    .
    .

     
    tricycle
    she takes the playground
    with her
    .
    Marilyn Ashbaugh
    .
    .
    I love those last two lines! Fresh, original, affirming.
    .
    .

     
    out my window the multi-colored streak of a passing garden
    .
    Mark Meyer
    .
    .
    A successfully long monostich (aka monoku) that takes the pace of a fast bike ride, as long as you didn’t do a Chris Froome!
     .
    .

    assisted living
    he still brings her flowers
    each day
    .
    Pris Campbell
    .
    .
    I like that we are allowed to imagine a different kind of person, be it a son; a sibling; a husband; a lover; or even childhood admirer! 🙂
    .
    .

    peddling into the wind
    bees hold tight
    to the flowers
    .
    Rehn Kovacic
    .
    .
    Intriguing. I couldn’t be sure if peddling was chosen over pedaling? If it is a typo, it’s a great one, keep it! I can imagine the bees taking their goods of pollen to ‘a different place’! 🙂
    .
    .

    noun
    noun: peddling
    the activity of selling an illegal drug or stolen item.

    or
    ‘to sell things, especially by taking them to different place ‘
    .
    .
    pedalling
    noun
    noun: pedalling; noun: pedaling
    1. 
the action of working the pedals of a bicycle.
     .
    .

    retired rickshaw
    flowers in place
    of passengers
    .
    Rich Schilling
    Webster Groves, MO
    .
    .
    I love how that middle line works! It’s more than just a pivot/hinge line, as is real beauty of line placement. Brilliant! 🙂
    .
    .

    retirement bash –
    the jade sculptor’s
    rested tools
    .
    Robert Kingston
    .
    .
    I love how you have gone “behind the picture” in this!
    Brilliant!!! 🙂
    .
    .
     
    unclaimed bike –
    the pink flowers belong
    to everyone
    .
    robyn brooks
    usa
    .
    .
    Great opening line, and each line powers ahead, brilliant! Enjoy the short film above! 🙂
    .
    .
     
    all day planting flowers
    filling the holes
    of depression
    .
    Ronald K. Craig
    Batavia, OH USA
    .
    .
    Powerful work, and so apt, topic, and accurate, and a great haiku. You should also send this to a gardening or health journal.
    .
    .

     
    writer’s block
    the symmetry
    in the overlook
    .
    simonj
    UK
    .
    .
    Ah, spot on! And were you perhaps uncharacteristically starting to vacuum the room, and wash up the dishes, even next door’s dishes? 🙂
    .
    .
    Great set, wish I could comment on everyone’s!
    .
    .

    1. peddling into the wind
      bees hold tight
      to the flowers
      .
      Rehn Kovacic

      I thought of someone selling plants, so ‘peddling’ came to me first. But, as you say, Alan, both (verbs?) work well.
      Amusing thought that bees would have to hold on tightly, as if they needed to, even withstanding the speed of an old tricycle.

      1. My pleasure Arvinder!
        .
        .
        no moon night –
        the gardener brings home
        so many fireflies
        .
        arvinder kaur
        Chandigarh, India
        .
        .
        I love that it’s a night of the new moon, which we know is confusing, as it means ‘no moon’! 🙂
        So the gardener bringing back moonlight via fireflies is magically beautiful!

    2. Dear Alan –
      I sincerely appreciate your kind and generous words. Thank you😌
      And…thank you for the nudge to see the short film “Bicycle” (Jitensha)…it was very poignant and really moved me.

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