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HAIKU DIALOGUE – Rooms – Looking Out (1)

Rooms with Guest Editor Marietta McGregor

The month of July is about a room of one’s own, or someone else’s. Many of us spend more time within four walls than we do outside. We are born, die, sleep, eat, write, paint, sew, sing, converse, discourse, learn, worship and interact in enclosed spaces. Often we seek out or create these spaces because they provide creature comforts. Animals have rooms of their own. A bear seeks its den to hibernate. Wombats and rabbits dig to create burrows. Birds build nests. Virginia Woolf extolled the advantages of a private income and one’s own space. Rooms can be working sanctuaries, but if our enclosures become overly constricting or confining, we may feel the walls are ‛closing in’ on us, as many felt during pandemic lockdowns.

Below is Marietta’s selection of poems on the theme of Looking Out:

window ledge
looking out for her
mother’s cactus

Deborah Karl-Brandt
Bonn Germany

 

outside the window
and on the radio —
summer rain

Bakhtiyar Amini
Germany

 

marmalade cat
on the window sill
stealing the sun

Ann Rawson
UK

 

summer day . . .
the yellow of sunflowers
from the window

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore
Catania (Italy)

 

viewed
through a hag stone
imperfect night sky

Roberta Beach Jacobson
Indianola, Iowa, USA

 

frame of mind
my perception
of the world

Bonnie J Scherer
Alaska USA

 

new neighbours
peeping through
the lace-covered window

Olivier Schopfer
Geneva, Switzerland

 

window frames
my favorite art
summer woods

Ruth Happel
United States

 

urban blossoms —
opening the window
to a pink moon

Steliana Cristina Voicu
Ploiesti, Romania

 

night flight
my french words
out the window

marilyn ashbaugh
edwardsburg, michigan USA

 

hospital visit
outside the window
nurses smoking

Tuyet Van Do
Australia

 

looking at the scar
in the mirror—
a tear in my eye

Jovana Dragojlovic
Belgrade, Serbia

 

wild apricot
freedom
out my hospital window

Charles Harper
Yokohama

 

lightning-lit sky
the courage provided
by a window pane

Richard L. Matta
San Diego, California USA

 

a flash of lightning
on the window
a blue lizard

Teiichi Suzuki
Japan

 

basement laundry
she folds the shirt
he left behind

Cindy Putnam Guentherman
Illinois, USA

 

last session
my therapist
opens a window

Alvin Cruz
Philippines

 

cleaning the windows
you gazed out as a child
spring breeze

Tony Williams
Scotland, UK

 

moonlight . . .
some of the best
already gone

Luciana Moretto
Treviso Italy

 

window watching . . .
grandad’s hair turns
iridescent

Samo Kreutz
Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

inheritance
seeing the neighbors
through her binoculars

Sarah E. Metzler
Pennsylvania, USA

 

nursing home visit
on the windowsill remnants
of a summer day

Eva Limbach
Deutschland

 

bluejay ruckus —
looking for the hawk
at every window

Susan Burch
Hagerstown, MD

 

open window —
the summer drenched
song of a koel

Rupa Anand
New Delhi, India

 

art gallery
through the window
what nature made

Bryan Rickert
Belleville, Illinois

 

an evening cloud
lowering the blinds
on the window

Dejan Ivanovic
Lazarevac, Serbia

 

foglie di salvia . . .
il colore di pioggia
sul davanzale

sage leaves . . .
that rain colour
on the windowsill

Angiola Inglese
Italia

 

Wednesday morning
through the bedroom window
another world

Mark Meyer
Mercer Island WA USA

 

painted window —
in my dreams outside
a garden

Ana Drobot
Romania

 

through a wavy window the neighbor’s wave

Sharon Ferrante
Florida, USA

 

chicken pecking
outside the kitchen window
tomorrow’s dinner

Mike Gallagher
Ballyduff, County Kerry, Ireland

 

open window
the sounds of spring
I can not see

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

 

a wintry day
the backyard cat’s gray face
pressed against the pane

Jackie Chou
United States

 

downsized
the window becomes
my new garden

Meera Rehm
UK

 

green tea
the sun trying to rise
above the buildings

Minal Sarosh
Ahmedabad, India

 

still lake waters for
the Prisoner of Chillon
dungeon with a view

Jenny Shepherd
London, UK

 

courtyard
a spider web
minus the spider

Margaret Mahony
Australia

 

jigsaw puzzle
sunshine and shadow
teasing my hillside view

Ingrid Baluchi
North Macedonia

 

chestnut tree . . .
a cat lies down
in its usual shade

Daniela Misso
Italy

 

treehouse
spotting the enemy attack
a mile off

Louise Hopewell
Australia

 

interior with window . . .
Matisse pulls the blue
from plein air

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

childhood bedroom
my view of oak leaves
mid-tree

Cynthia Anderson
Yucca Valley, California

 

bombing . . .
an aroma of olive branches wafts
through the broken window

Tsanka Shishkova
Bulgaria

 

his solitude —
the shadow of summer
in the window

Mariangela Canzi
Italy

 

from the bus window
snapshots with my mind’s eye

Carol Reynolds
Australia

 

backyard birds
lining up by size
to bathe

Ruth Holzer
Herndon VA

 

summer dusk
a cruise ship in the harbor
slowly turning

Keiko Izawa
Japan

 

a lone figure
in the lamp-lit window
our evening stroll

Peggy Hale Bilbro
Alabama

 

from my cage
freedom
of bird chatter

Jan Stretch
Victoria Canada

 

new parking lot
instead of old linden trees
closed windows

novi parking
umjesto starih lipa
zatvoreni prozori

Zdenka Mlinar
Croatia

 

a crystal vase
on her window sill
shards of sunlight

Barrie Levine
Massachusetts, USA

 

ash gourd vine
takes over the trellis
where roses grew

Neena Singh
India

 

last time I saw you
out the window twirling
a look of pure joy

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

snow
on snow . . .
stir-crazy

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio USA

 

bullet train
all those vague things
behind the window

Chen Xiaoou
Kunming, China

 

rose hip tea . . .
pouring through the window
summer sunset

Lori Kiefer
London UK

 

delayed monsoon
the crow on the fig branch
sunbathing

Dipankar Dasgupta
Kolkata, India

 

cacophony
of the neighbours
I feel at home . . .

Priti Khullar
India

 

puberty
glimpsing neighbor’s wife
through closed window

Margie Gustafson
United States

 

tree trunk hideaway she dreams deeper hollows

Colette Kern
Southold US

 

solarium garden view
the bronze Pan smiles
playing his flute

Rita Melissano
Illinois, USA

 

taillights blurring
to the plinks of rain
attic haiku

Ann Sullivan
Massachusetts USA

 

distant clouds
the window’s reflection
on a phone screen

Richard Straw
Cary, North Carolina

 

fern shadows the waiting room window

C.X.Turner
UK

 

window
mountain view
shuttered

Richard Bailly
Fargo, ND, USA

 

peering out,
the nest is
. . . empty

Alan Harvey
Tacoma, WA

 

again this sparrow
peering in my window
whistling as I dress

Margaret Tau
New Bern, North Carolina

 

attic bedroom
on my watch treetops
in the wind

Kathabela Wilson
USA

 

hospice bed
her view towards
the river bend

Maurice Nevile
Canberra, Australia

 

turning
to follow the sun
windowsill parsley

Sue Courtney
Orewa, New Zealand

 

morning runners
up with the sun
dream of Boston

Sigrid Saradunn
Bar Harbor, Maine

 

Godzilla lurks
the tallest tree transformed
by kudzu vines

kris moon kondo
Kiyokawa, Kanagawa, Japan

 

looking up
through the curtain lace
bits of blue sky

Debbie Scheving
United States

 

bedridden
a grasshopper jumping
out of the window

Florin C. Ciobica
Romania

 

the garden fades
to my face in the glass
approaching night

Keith Evetts
Thames Ditton, UK

 

Join us next week for Marietta’s commentary on additional poems, & our next prompt…

 

Guest editor Marietta McGregor is a fourth-generation Tasmanian who has made her home between Australia’s national capital Canberra and the scenic south coast of New South Wales for over four decades. A lover of the natural world since childhood, she went on to study botany and zoology, and has worked as palynologist, garden designer, science journalist, editor, university tutor, education manager, and grants developer for the national wildlife collection. A photography and travel enthusiast since retiring, she enjoys capturing fine detail of fleeting moments. She came late to haiku, which appealed for its close observation and poetic expression of ephemeral experience. Her haiku, haibun and haiga have been widely published, have won awards and appear in anthologies.

Lori Zajkowski is the Post Manager for Haiku Dialogue. A novice haiku poet, she lives in New York City.

Managing Editor Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019). Find her at: kjmunro1560.wordpress.com.

The Haiku Foundation reminds you that participation in our offerings assumes respectful and appropriate behavior from all parties. Please see our Code of Conduct policy.

Please note that all poems & images appearing in Haiku Dialogue may not be used elsewhere without express permission – copyright is retained by the creators. Please see our Copyright Policies.

This Post Has 25 Comments

  1. a flash of lightning
    on the window
    a blue lizard

    Teiichi Suzuki
    Japan

    The contrast between L1 and L3 is superb. I have never come across a blue lizard. Google helped.

  2. Looking forward once again to your photographic works of art, Marietta. Thank you.

    last session
    my therapist
    opens a window

    Alvin Cruz
    Philippines

    Second read through I appreciated the double meaning in “opens a window.”

    a flash of lightning
    on the window
    a blue lizard

    Teiichi Suzuki
    Japan

    Moving image, with a surprise last line.

    marmalade cat
    on the window sill
    stealing the sun

    Ann Rawson
    UK

    Musical, loved the sunny colors together, and it captured the cat’s personality.

    I also thought that the translation of “leaves of sage…” from the Italian by simonj was lovely.

    1. How I’d like to know the language: I have to settle for using the Google translator, but luckily I can make myself understood, but I can’t use all the nuances of the language I think in … I often feel very limited.

  3. So many great haiku giving a peek through all these windows, congratulations and thanks to all of the poets. Really enjoyed Susan Burch’s haiku
    bluejay ruckus —
    looking for the hawk
    at every window
    –Susan Burch
    and Ruth Holzer ‘s
    backyard birds
    lining up by size
    to bathe
    –Ruth Holder

    These are both haiku moments that resonated with me.

    Again, congratulations to you all for your haiku.

  4. just delightful …

    a crystal vase
    on her window sill
    shards of sunlight

    Barrie Levine
    Massachusetts, USA

  5. Congratulations everyone. I enjoyed reading them all. Here are three of my favorites:

    art gallery
    through the window
    what nature made

    Bryan Rickety

    snow
    on snow…
    stir-crazy

    Valentine Ranaldi-Adams

    summer dusk
    a cruise ship in the harbor
    slowly turning

    Seiko Izawa

  6. Thanks to Marietta, and congratulations to all the poets. I have a couple of favorites this week:

    bullet train
    all those vague things
    behind the window

    Chen Xiaoou
    Kunming, China

    hospice bed
    her view towards
    the river bend

    Maurice Nevile
    Canberra, Australia

  7. Thank you Marietta for including my haiku, loved the theme and enjoyed all
    poet’s work.

  8. Such a lovely collection of poems! Grateful to have mine included. Here’s one of my favorites from this collection…

    tree trunk hideaway she dreams deeper hollows

    Colette Kern
    Southold US

  9. A treat to have a mind’s eye collage of views from around the world. Thank you, Marietta, for another inspiring topic, and for including mine.
    Among the many others, I particularly liked the two following thought-provoking poems:

    from my cage
    freedom
    of bird chatter

    Jan Stretch
    Victoria Canada

    frame of mind
    my perception
    of the world

    Bonnie J Scherer
    Alaska USA

    1. Thank you for your appreciation! As a big fan of jigsaw puzzles, I like your poem as well…

      jigsaw puzzle
      sunshine and shadow
      teasing my hillside view

      Ingrid Baluchi
      North Macedonia

  10. Thank you for selecting my ku. Interesting views on Looking Out. Congratulations to everyone. Looking forward to the next challenge.

  11. Thank you Marietta for including my haiku in this Haiku Dialogue on Looking Out and congratulations to all the poets here! I had the Badfinger song lyrics in my head, “Looking out of my lonely room, day after day…” when I was thinking about the theme this week. These two haiku really expressed the theme beautifully in my mind although so many excellent haiku it’s hard to choose favorites. The assonance and consonance are also wonderful – evening and lowering, cloud and blinds, lowering and window:

    an evening cloud
    lowering the blinds
    on the window

    Dejan Ivanovic

    And this haiku also captured me. The “n” sounds carried throughout in distant, window, reflection, on, phone and screen. This haiku is one of those that, to me, can also be read with the lines in reverse and is lovely both ways:
    distant clouds
    the window’s reflection
    on a phone screen

    Richard Straw

  12. Marietta, many thanks for choosing one of mine. Many thanks also to all at the Haiku Foundation that make this column possible. Congrats to all the poets. Encouragement to all the poets who were not chosen.

  13. A beautiful selection, with many different observations. Thank you Marietta for choosing one of mine.

    1. foglie di salvia . . .
      il colore di pioggia
      sul davanzale

      sage leaves . . .
      that rain colour
      on the windowsill

      Angiola Inglese

      I like this, but do prefer the Italian word order. Much more musical.

      1. My translations from Italian, my language in which I think, often don’t give the best, also because I’m forced to use the Google translator because I’ve never studied the English language, by now it’s too late for me. Thank you Simonj.

        1. Thank you for the explanation. And thank you for the poem.

          leaves of sage . . .
          the colour of rain
          on the windowsill

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