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HAIKU DIALOGUE – Resolutions – Success (1)

Resolutions with Guest Editor John S Green

The start of each year is an opportunity to renew. We humans often make declarations. We write down goals, we resolve to do better, we create targets, we make promises. We also regret last year’s unsuccessful promises. Last year, we may have accomplished a few goals, but others we failed – some ridiculously quickly.

Over the month of January, let’s look at this annual tradition of making resolutions. The success we have had, and the failures also.

Below is John’s selection of poems on the theme of success:

Kathy and Lori, our trusted sherpas for Haiku Dialogue, have decided to make each submission/prompt exercise a two-week event. The first week (below) we reveal the editor’s (that’s me) long list of chosen selections without specific commentary. The second week, the editor’s handpicked poems are commented on for distinctive recognition. At this time the ‘prompt’ for the next week begins.

Our hope is to have you give additional time to the editor’s selections, and to show appreciation to your fellow poets in the comments section.

Over 200 poets from 36 countries sent in over 300 poems. For next week, I have reserved 17 poems for special comment.

The passion we haiku poets have for our art is evident in the many resolutions directed at writing aspirations. The full range, from humorous to heartbreaking emotions were shared. Thank you all for taking the time to read and respond in your personal creative manner. Our haiku community is a gift.

writing is
not for weaklings…
Way of Haiku

Deborah Karl-Brandt
Bonn Germany

 

early January
our eyes meet
outside the cake shop

Keith Evetts
Thames Ditton UK

 

gorgeous gossamer
the success of spiders
speaks for itself

Nitu Yumnam
India

 

new year
how old resolutions
triumph

Jeff Leong
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

 

over the stadium
after the grand final
birds singing

Krzysztof Mxchx
Poland

 

little victories…
today I got out of bed
and put on some clothes

Jonathan Aylett
Liverpool, UK

 

wanderlust
my tiny sailboat takes me
through wave-torn seas

Pris Campbell
U.S.A.

 

the scent
of a well-scrubbed kitchen
…take-out for dinner

Baisali Chatterjee Dutt
Kolkata, India

 

turning the page
to see my own poems
a journey begins

Eavonka Ettinger
Long Beach, CA

 

Late night swim
I scoop the moon
in my palms

Nisha Raviprasad
India

 

January first
Through January second
That is my record

Jennifer Gurney
United States

 

New Year’s Day
resolutions never set
an annual triumph

Jenny Shepherd
London, UK

 

tears of joy
the cries
of newly born child

Jelive Geverola
Carmen, Bohol, Philippines

 

river stones
tumble over and over and over
new love

wanda amos
Old Bar, Australia

 

insomnia
recognize the “winter triangle”
without dad’s help

Tsanka Shishkova
Bulgaria

 

twists and turns
new lead loaded
in the pencil

Caroline Giles Banks
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

 

cornstalks sprouting
between the rocks –
my first garden

Dan Campbell
Virginia

 

adventure calls
going on foot all the way
to the second floor

Samo Kreutz
Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

Baby’s first steps
The twinkling stars applaud
Mother’s joy

Achingliu Kamei
India

 

reining in
my relation with alcohol
perseverance

Paul Callus
Malta

 

success—
I drive my dad’s
old car

Ana Drobot
Romania

 

a happy child
his top spins longer
than before

Zelyko Funda
Hrvatska

 

words float
in my mind…
first poem

Mariangela Canzi
Italy

 

acrophobia …
i make it
to the first bough

Firdaus Parvez
India

 

unrolled yoga mat . . .
i search my whatsapp
for the zoom class link

Kavitha Sreeraj
India

 

university
back to learning
how to learn

Sherry Grant
Auckland, New Zealand

 

nine years of HCG tests :
out of blue oriole song

Meera Rehm
UK

 

opening night
the actor makes my words
so much more

Louise Hopewell
Australia

 

success unimportant
enjoying an afternoon
cup of green tea

Rehn Kovacic
Mesa, AZ

 

finally a diploma
mom’s and dad’s tears

konačno diploma
mamine i tatine suze

Zdenka Mlinar
Croatia

 

new habits…
halfway
to zero waste

Cynthia Anderson
Yucca Valley, California

 

Xanax finally getting that MRI

Susan Burch
Hagerstown, MD

 

yellow roses
finding our way back
my old friend and I

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

 

spring victory
in the leftover snow
crocuses

Kirsten Ge
Germany

 

cataracts gone
scaffolding down
our repainted house

Charles Harper
Yokohama

 

learn to write–
again and again father wipes
my blackboard

Helga Stania
Switzerland

 

most of mayday
defrosting the icebox . . .
drips from the eaves

simonj
UK

 

that first coffee
hard and bitter—at last
my poor pen gliding

Bittor Duce Zubillaga
Basque Country

 

ankle break
i overcome my fear
of steps

Ingrid Baluchi
North Macedonia

 

finally the thaw
me and the voice in my head
forgive each other

lev hart
Calgary, Canada

 

little free library
halfway house for books
on the way to new lives

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

at eighty-five
just happy to live
another day

Christa Pandey
Austin, TX USA

 

a plant
for every mistake I make
spring garden

Vandana Parashar
India

 

a few steps
more than last year –
new year’s ginko walk

Milan Rajkumar
Imphal, India

 

brain game
a haiku
every day

Susan Farner
USA

 

Morning walks –
I’m no longer afraid
of my shadow

Passeggiate mattutine –
non ho più paura
della mia ombra

Maria Teresa Piras
Serrenti – Italy

 

quince jam
yak u mamy vdoma
whispered the refugee

(In Ukrainian yak u mamy vdoma means “like at mom’s house”.)

Mircea Moldovan
România

 

pruning
my old haiku . . .
reblooming roses

Barrie Levine
Massachusetts, USA

 

clouds in the sky . . .
at sunset
a rose blooming

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore
Catania (Italy)

 

31 Dec writing on the last page of my journal

Padma Rajeswari
Mumbai, India

 

whistling
like a bush warbler
my merry way

Kath Abela Wilson
Pasadena, California

 

health
and books
success

Refika Dedić
Bosnia and Herzegovina

 

Skids and scars
yet a crescent smile-
my first ride on bike

Santhoshi Valli
India

 

sunny morning
the first ripe tomato
in my new garden

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

graduation party
calling my parents’ friends
by their first names

Tim Cremin
Massachusetts

 

Planted the first seed,
In the soil of my raised beds
A hobby started.

K.G. Munro
Scotland

 

a sizable dent
in my to-be-read list
one hundred books

Jenn Ryan-Jauregui
Tucson, Arizona USA

 

claw machine
my brother and I
exchanging prizes

Anthony Rabang
Philippines

 

no yellow tint
with cataracts gone
night driving

Herbert Shippey
Tifton, Georgia

 

sprinting past the finish line December haiku

Ann Sullivan
Massachusetts USA

 

still alive
one year later
hardy houseplant

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

svakog dana
šetnja i jedan haiku
moj dar sebi

every day
a walk and one haiku
my gift to myself

Gordana Kurtović
Croatia

 

my old dance shoes
still dare to tango
sharing new secrets

Annie Wilson
Shropshire, UK

 

throwing
my last opponent
black belt

Ruth Holzer
Herndon, VA

 

sick boy
shows his dad
paper boats

bolesni dječak
pokazuje tati
čamce od papira

Zrinko Šimunić
Croatia

 

check marking a task
on my to-do list
winter stars

Tomislav Sjekloća
Cetinje, Montenegro

 

success in a smile…
happy hormones
jumpstart each day

Jan Stretch
Victoria, Canada

 

once more
haiku poets gather
August heat

Victor Ortiz
Bellingham, Washington

 

fresh wind
turning the leaves…
daily haiku practice

Adele Evershed
Wilton, Connecticut

 

step by step
adding more each day
to a clearer path

Kathleen Mazurowski
Chicago, IL

 

pouring rain …
in the sewing box
everything is in order

Angiola Inglese
Italy

 

blue, green, black
ink-covered pages —
last year’s full journal

Elizabeth Shack
Illinois

 

another year
of dodging the virus . . .
Novid

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio USA

 

my daughter’s first wail—
my body floating
in bliss

Cristina Povero
Italy

 

patient care
the first blooms
of my money plant

Mona Iordan
Romania

 

hybridised roses
burgeoning
my extended family

Luisa Santoro
Rome, Italy

 

january first end to end yoga mats

Kerry J Heckman
Seattle, WA

 

winter sun escaping my shadows

C.X.Turner
United Kingdom

 

branching out…
I try some new
poetry forms

Nancy Brady
Huron, Ohio

 

the winding way—
the dance
as destination

Allison Douglas-Tourner
Victoria, BC Canada

 

spring cleaning
I grow ten years
younger

Sushama Kapur
India

 

new year, new me
and I am moving mountains…
in my laundry room

Rebecca Kolstad
Rochester, NY

 

new haiku
the submission calendar
fills with smileys

Neena Singh
India

 

still bragging
last year’s
trophy

Zoe Grant
Auckland, New Zealand

 

small victories
i listen to
what my body says

Amoolya Kamalnath
India

 

January 2023
back to the same weight
as pre Covid

Kris moon kondo
Kiyokawa, Kanagawa, Japan

 

countdown…
teaching my mother
my breathwork

Lorelyn De la Cruz Arevalo
Bombon, Philippines

 

ninety-nine said no
one said yes—
‘W’

Stephen J. DeGuire
Los Angeles, CA

 

new year’s day
finish the jigsaw puzzle
unfinished by mom

John Zheng
Mississippi, USA

 

Join us next week for John’s commentary on additional poems, & our next prompt…

 

Guest Editor John S Green, author of Whimsy Park: Children’s Poems for the Whole Family, is widely published in all styles of poetry – especially haiku. John lived in Europe before moving to the United States at age thirteen. His daughter cooks with spice, and his wife still laughs at his jokes.

Lori Zajkowski is the Post Manager for Haiku Dialogue. A novice haiku poet, she lives in New York City.

Managing Editor Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019). Find her at: kjmunro1560.wordpress.com.

The Haiku Foundation reminds you that participation in our offerings assumes respectful and appropriate behavior from all parties. Please see our Code of Conduct policy.

Please note that all poems & images appearing in Haiku Dialogue may not be used elsewhere without express permission – copyright is retained by the creators. Please see our Copyright Policies.

This Post Has 32 Comments

  1. I enjoyed the poems highlighted. In terms of success or failure of New Year resolutions, as someone who is useless at even making one, several resonated…

    Jenny Shepherd’s unmade promises to change were an instant guarantee of success, and I hope Jennifer Gurney celebrated her record of 24 hours. 😄 Less talk and more action was evident in Kerry J Heckman’s concrete one-liner, situated in a yoga class. But even so, it was still only the first day of January.

    Finally, Keith Evetts’ haiku began by hinting at the beginning of something, rather than the breaking of a promise not to eat cake, but at least he made it a little further into the month!

    early January
    
our eyes meet
    
outside the cake shop

    Keith Evetts


    Haiku to make us smile as we embark upon another year with resolve—or not.

  2. Thank you, John. I’m using the time to comment this week instead of writing to the next prompt and it feels good to slow down a little.

    Thank you, Nick for your wonderful comment and I am so glad this verse resonated in the way it did.

    Many stood out for me this week including:
    *
    spring victory
    in the leftover snow
    crocuses

    Kirsten Ge
    Germany

    This verse makes me pause, smile and reflect on the small victories that are all around us in nature.
    *
    january first end to end yoga mats

    Kerry J Heckman
    Seattle, WA

    Such a vivid image that strikes a chord as someone who picks up and puts down yoga practice more than I’d care to admit.

    1. Thanks, C.X. Turner. That is perhaps the main point—to slow the process down allowing not just the editor more time, but the participants additional time to read, digest, and put forth comments on favorites. Thank you.
      John

  3. Greetings and Happy New Year to all!
    Just a quick note to thank you John for including my haiku in this selection.
    I did enjoy reading all the haiku which are very inspiring.

  4. Thank you so much, John Green, for including my Haiku this week.
    Reading all of the selected Haiku’s was fun.

    This one stuck with me the most

    at eighty-five
    just happy to live
    another day

    Christa Pandey
    Austin, TX USA

    And this one I could relate to 🙂

    branching out…
    I try some new
    poetry forms

    Nancy Brady
    Huron, Ohio

    1. Thanks Rebecca, for reading or noticing. I am glad that you could relate to mine. I may never master any poetry form completely, but I want to keep learning.

      I liked Christa’s as well and can hope I feel the same way at 85, too.

      Good luck with your mountain climbing. May you reach the top. I smiled when I read it because I battle that same mountain here, and then I notice the next one. ☺

  5. Thank you John. So many interesting poems. These two stood out for me:

    winter sun escaping my shadows
    C.X.Turner
    United Kingdom

    I can feel the sun on my cheeks and my spirits lifting!

    ***

    sprinting past the finish line December haiku

    Ann Sullivan
    Massachusetts USA

    I am intrigued by this poem and the energy it exudes.

  6. lots of good poems
    these 2 stuck with me:
    *
    graduation party
    calling my parents’ friends
    by their first names

    Tim Cremin
    Massachusetts
    *
    parity with the grown-ups…. wow! a milestone moment.
    *
    pouring rain …
    in the sewing box
    everything is in order

    Angiola Inglese
    Italy
    lovely fragment /phrase
    a rainy day put to good use

  7. Hope you all are having a lovely new year. What beautiful poems. All those little victories in everyday lives put a smile on my face: so many I could relate too. Thank you John for mentioning mine in this lovely list.

  8. Happy New Year to the haiku community!

    Thank you, John for your time to review, select and comment on the hundreds of haiku that come your way, weekly. You obviously love your work. From the number of haiku this week about haiku, there are others who share that joy.

    I enjoyed many of the haiku mentioned above, but wanted to say that this one particularly touched my heart. When we are away from home, don’t we revel in things that are familiar? Sounds, smells, foods, etc. can invoke both pleasant and perhaps not-so-pleasant memories of that place we call “home”. The Ukrainian refugee mentioned may be a specific person, but, to me, represents the citizens of a war-torn and displaced nation. This beautiful memory of a better time brought tears to my eyes. I can read both sadness and hope in the words. Lovely writing, Mircea. Thank you.

    quince jam
    yak u mamy vdoma
    whispered the refugee

    (In Ukrainian yak u mamy vdoma means “like at mom’s house”.)

    Mircea Moldovan
    România

    1. Thank you very much for the appreciation, for the emotion that my haiku evoked in you and for the kind words, Holly B.

      With friendship,
      Mircea

  9. I am very excited about this new two week process. I hope it brings more time for editors and for poets alike.

    Thank you, John, for including my poem. It wasn’t surprising to find so many here who share my joy at success with the written word.

    That said, this verse made me laugh out loud for capturing how I feel about most resolutions:

    January first
    Through January second
    That is my record

    Jennifer Gurney
    United States

  10. small victories
    i listen to
    what my body says

    Amoolya Kamalnath
    India

    Amoolya’s above haiku really spoke to me. After my many years of listening practice, it remains a victory when successful. Kudos to the poet!

    Also, thank you John for the clarification of long list this week and selected list next week. What a great idea!

  11. new haiku
    the submission calendar
    fills with smileys
    /
    Neena Singh
    India
    /
    Sometimes writing a haiku brings a smile to the poet. Sometimes having a haiku published brings a smile to the poet. Continued Good Luck in the future Neena with filling your calendar with smileys.

    1. Dear Valentina, thank you so much for your appreciation and sweet wishes. You are so right about the smiles—penning & timely submission and acceptance by Editors (like you) bring them. 😊
      Warm regards,
      Neena

  12. Thank you, John, for including my haiku in this lengthy selection. I definitely don’t envy you the hard task of judging!
    Congratulations to all who feature in the list.

  13. Thank you John for including my haiku on the long list this week and congratulations to all the poets here! I appreciate this one by Rebecca. Tackling the laundry pile is a great subject:
    new year, new me
    and I am moving mountains…
    in my laundry room

    Rebecca Kolstad
    Rochester, NY

    And this one by Laurie – what an interesting haiku on a way to think about little free libraries:
    little free library
    halfway house for books
    on the way to new lives

    Laurie Greer
    Washington, DC

    I am not quite clear on the new Haiku Dialogue procedure. Are the 17 haiku that will appear next week with commentary coming from this list or are those haiku not appearing until next week?

    1. Hi Sari,

      First off, thanks for commenting on two poems. That means a great deal to the ones you hand-picked.
      .
      Also, to answer your query, the 17 poems I have reserved will be additional selections—not from this ‘long list’.

      Cheers,
      John

    2. Congrats to you! I also enjoyed your Haiku. Hopefully both of us will have clean laundry rooms and healthy plants in 2023.
      Thank you, Sari, for the appreciation of my submission!

    3. Sari – this is a work in progress, so we will try it this way for now & see how it goes… thanks for joining us for the ride, kj

  14. I am happy to be selected again but the way it was edited/posted was NOT the way I wrote/submitted it. I guess I’ll take the ‘W’. Congrats to all!

    1. Hi Stephen,
      Yes, here is your submission:
      .
      ninety-nine
      said no one said yes—
      ‘W’
      .
      Stephen J. DeGuire
      Los Angeles, CA
      .
      I had to read this a few times until I realized ‘ninety-nine’ went with ‘said no’. As editor, I probably would not accept it as you wrote it. But by bring the ‘said no’ up to the first line, it becomes a clear message of resolute determination, with a gentle sense of humor, and a ‘W’!
      Thank you,
      John

    2. Stephen – also to say that sometimes (read usually) formatting does not come through properly on the submission form, so we encourage poets to describe anything unusual – like spacing or italics – so we get it right… feel free to include your poem here as you would like it to appear! kj

  15. little victories . . .
    today I got out of bed
    and put on some clothes

    Jonathan Aylett
    Liverpool

    We mostly take for granted the many actions required to live our daily lives, so this poem gave me reason to reflect, as did the following:

    adventure calls
    going on foot all the way
    to the second floor

    Samu Kreutz
    Ljubljana, Slovenia

    As someone who just needs to look at an indoor plant to make it feel ill, I enjoyed the following:

    still alive
    one year later
    hardy houseplant

    Sari Grandstaff
    Saugerties, NY, USA

    Something we all need to accomplish wherever the opportunity and facilities exist, unfortunately not everywhere yet:

    new habits . . .
    halfway
    to zero waste

    Cynthia Anderson
    Yucca Valley, California

    Thank you, John, for including my submission, and for the continued work by the team, appreciated as always.

    1. Thank you Ingrid for the appreciation. I do not have a green thumb either so this houseplant is a record for me.

  16. Greetings to all!
    Reading so many success stories is uplifting and inspiring. So many poets wrote about success in haiku writing and that’s wonderful!

    This haiku expressed the joy of living each day and there’s success in this :

    at eighty-five
    just happy to live
    another day

    Christa Pandey
    Austin, TX USA

    Vandana Parashar’s spring garden also touched a chord.

    Congratulations to all featured poets, and looking forward to the 17 haiku selected for the Editors Commentary next week..

    Grateful to John for including my ku in his selection

  17. Thank-you John for selecting mine and welcome. Thank-you also to Kathy, Lori, and the Haiku Foundation.

  18. Happy New Year! Congrats to all the poets for all your successes. What a positive set of haiku. The haiku are intermixed, some with humor, warmth, fondness, sadness, and/or love.

    A couple haiku jumped out at me with a quick reading. First, I appreciated this one for the difficulty of achieving this feat since my list keeps growing:
    a sizable dent
    in my to-be-read list
    one hundred books

    Jenn Ryan-Jauregui
    although Laurie Greer might have part of the answer with her Little Free Library (except it hasn’t worked for me with my LFL).
    little free library
    halfway house for books
    on the way to new lives

    Laurie Greer

    The daily practice of writing one haiku…kudos to all who have already managed that discipline (reading through the list there are many). And those who are revising (pruning), editing, submitting, that’s commendable.

    Kudos to those who are making positive steps with health concerns whether dieting, avoiding disease, getting better, or dealing with issues.

    Overall, again, how uplifting these haiku all are.

    Thanks, John, for including one of mine in this mix.

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