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HAIKU DIALOGUE – Migration – Flora and Fauna – long list

Migration with Guest Editor Carole MacRury

Migration is the movement of people from one place to another, with the intention of resettlement. For thousands of years humans have moved and expanded their range over land bridges that no longer exist.  These early nomads followed the food, the climate or fled natural disasters. Historically, mass migration has shaped every country in the world through both conflicts and exploration. It continues today as our world grows smaller due to international trade and travel. There are many causes of international migration. Some people move in search of work or economic opportunity, to reunite with family or to study. My family fits into this category when we left Canada to study in the US, and never went back. Some move to escape conflict, persecution, or large-scale human rights violations. Still others move in response to the adverse effects of climate change, natural disasters, or other environmental factors. And some people were forcefully stolen from their countries to become slaves in another country. These migratory patterns shaped our countries. We wouldn’t be the same without the rich influx in immigrants who enriched our lives through their contributions in science, politics, technology, fashion, food, music, art and so much more. Most of us in the Americas can trace our roots back to another country. Indigenous people have their own unique stories to tell about the effects of colonization on their lives.  We’ll explore this rich topic for the next few weeks calling upon our own experiences with emigration, our own experiences with the migration of flora and fauna, and lastly, our internal migration within our own countries.

Below is Carole’s selection of poems on the topic of Flora and Fauna:

Thank you everyone for sending such a variety of haiku to this prompt. The long list offers an amazing look at flora and fauna from around the globe. It’s understandable that with such a subject you’ll come across an unfamiliar name on occasion. Don’t hesitate to check it out with a quick google, as it will enrich your reading. There are a few haiku I’d like to comment on myself and will post them in the comments. Please do the same and post your own favorites. Don’t hesitate to ask each other questions, as I learned so much from the notes attached with submissions, and my own online searches. One thing is clear. We are all in this together when it comes to preserving and protecting the natural world. I learned something from every poem, including those that didn’t make it onto this list, so grateful thanks to each and every one of you.

old bluebird box
a familiar pair starts
the new nest

Richard Straw
Cary, North Carolina

 

the stork still waiting…
its partner survived the war
but not… the wire

Urszula Marciniak
Poland

 

gianthogweedgianthogweedgianthog

Adele Evershed
Wilton, Connecticut

 

new sugar factory
the teakwood tree
turns into trophy tables

Padmini Krishnan
United Arab Emirates

 

flora and fauna
where is man
without you

Satyanarayana Chittaluri
Hyderabad, India

 

Serengeti
inching forever toward the
beginning

Vishal Prabhu
India

 

six lane highway no deer crossing

Peggy Hale Bilbro
Alabama

 

pulling off a coup congress grass

Vandana Parashar
India

 

wineberries
getting looped
with a cedar waxwing

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

old pond…
lesser croaks
this season

Neena Singh
India

 

bonsai banyan
a small reminder
of home

Baisali Chatterjee Dutt
Kolkata, India

 

wildfire
the clouds in the sky
not the good kind

Stephen A Peters
Bellingham, WA

 

poisoning
riparian forests
bitter mourning

Bonnie J Scherer
Alaska USA

 

crossing
borders and barriers
…coronavirus

wanda amos
Australia

 

Romantic night…
chasing some fireflies
in woodblock prints

Ana Drobot
Romania

 

crossing over
the last icy river–
barren-ground caribou

Ruth Holzer
Herndon, VA

 

discussing how to kill them humanly nutrias

Deborah Karl-Brandt
Bonn, Germany

 

naming the fruits
our kids have never eaten
legacy question

Biswajit Mishra
Canada

 

leaving
my heart follows
the Godwits

Maureen Sudlow
New Zealand

 

refugee…
in the only backpack
a handful of soil

Tsanka Shishkova
Bulgaria

 

milkweed
for the monarchs
a new rest stop

Eavonka Ettinger
Long Beach, CA

 

honeysuckle
invasion’s
sweet side

Marilyn Ashbaugh
Gulf Stream, Florida

 

passing boar
a stick-tight hitches to
his promised land

Chen Xiaoou
Kunming, China

 

dressed to kill
the delicate blossoms
of water hyacinth

Ravi Kiran
India

 

frogless
a big splash
of tail fin

Jeff Leong
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

 

the last wild wolf howl
I hear it in my dreams
not my nightmares

Jenny Shepherd
London, UK

 

the unwelcome guest
in our garden
Japanese knotweed

Tracy Davidson
Warwickshire, UK

 

the blush
of winter brides
pink poui

Daya Bhat
India

 

silence silenced the Nilgiri Tahr hide and seek

Lakshmi Iyer
Kerala, India

 

at the window
migrating songbirds –
I learn to make origami cranes

Daniela Lăcrămioara Capotă
Romania

 

winter wonder
robin in a tree
at thirty below

Pamela Jeanne
Yukon, Canada

 

along the flyway
towards greener pastures
migrating geese and me

Ram Chandran
India

 

still waiting
for a sparrow to call
spring sunrise

Lori Kiefer
UK

 

winged migration
floating through the sky
a crop of children

John S Green
Amman, Jordan

 

christmas exchanging giblets for chestnuts

simonj
UK

 

mango pollen
a nightingale’s song
opens the summer

Arvinder Kaur
Chandigarh India

 

starving jumbos raid red blood flows

Radhika De Silva
Sri Lanka

 

folded
in on itself
fawn yoga

Jerome Berglund
United States

 

a flock of expats
along the Kona coast
song sparrows

Sarah Paris
Santa Rosa, CA

 

vibrant jasmine
even the national flower
was an implant

M. R. Defibaugh
United States

 

waving and whispering
Vaya Con Dios
to migrating geese

Dan Campbell
Virginia

 

Mosquito Joe
in the neighborhood
no fireflies

Susan Farner
USA

 

pug marks —
the tiger
they never saw

Mona Bedi
Delhi, India

 

hybrid imports –
in home grown juicy oranges
a taste of fear

Hla Yin Mon
Yangon, Myanmar

 

meditation
first stalks of cotton
on the moon

Minko Tanev
Bulgaria

 

March
damp shamrocks and dirt
sent par avion

Ann Sullivan
Massachusetts USA

 

ivy . . .
my ladder to heaven
intertwined with mist

Ivan Gaćina
Zadar, Croatia

 

flower seller
leaving some behind
for the bees

C.X. Turner
UK

 

mild midwinter
marooned
the solitary painted bunting

Jonathan English
Washington, DC

 

Chasing fireflies
In starlit courtyards
A myth

Rashmi Buragohain
India

 

summer loneliness
less hummingbirds
than usual

Susan Burch
Hagerstown, MD

 

In a field of cows
the swallow dreams
of wildebeest

Caroline Ridley-Duff
UK

 

parthenium
now marching
to the mountains

Govind Joshi
Dehradun, India

 

chickenpox –
child draws
a giraffe

Aljoša Vuković
Croatia, Šibenik

 

Refugee camp –
his only permanent
address.

Nikola Đuretić
Zagreb (Croatia)

 

I miss you firefly lost in urban lights

Sharon Ferrante
FL, USA

 

campfire tales –
the big bad wolf
on the protected list

Ana Drobot
Romania

 

where have all
the fireflies gone
a child’s sigh

Cindy Putnam Guentherman
Loves Park, Illinois, USA

 

Ohrid Lake
indigenous trout shimmer
between plastic bags

Ingrid Baluchi
Ohrid, North Macedonia

 

Milk Full Moon
the deer cub trying to get up
in the dewy grass

Steliana Cristina Voicu
Ploiesti, Romania

 

after bird flu
a raucous rumpus
gannets return to Bass Rock

Ann Rawson
Scotland, UK

 

the swallow flaps
its wings uncertainly –
first flight to the South

Jovana Dragojlovic
Belgrade, Serbia

 

pufferfish among
the sardines in the network –
a smuggled migrant

Tomislav Maretić
Zagreb, Hrvatska / Croatia

 

buffalo roam
off the rez
reparation scouts

Caroline Giles Banks
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

 

blue crab invasion
starred chefs’ menus
change color

Barbara Anna Gaiardoni
Verona (Italy)

 

silent picnic
lonely among the weeds
the lady’s slipper

(Lady’s slipper is the popular name in Romania of a Cypripedioideae orchid species protected by law.)

Mircea Moldovan
România

 

Nona’s seeds
from Europe
now Robina tree in OZ

Margaret Mahony
Australia

 

murmuration darkens songbirds ceiling

Alan Harvey
Tacoma, WA

 

laying eggs
in sands that hatched her
green sea turtle

Gavin Austin
Sydney, Australia

 

night migration
bogong moths vanish
into porch lights

Louise Hopewell
Australia

 

new neighbor
whistling from the shrubbery
a laughingthrush

Charles Harper
Yokohama

 

Bagheera in zoo…
the greedy hope to see more
in the wild

Santhoshi Valli
India

 

in the field of flora
under the starry sky
trace of fauna

Refika Dedić
Bosnia and Herzegovina

 

young fox
reclaiming his habitat
drinks at the bird bath

Christa Pandey
Austin, TX

 

migrant rabbits
in far-off New Zealand …
lessons unlearned

Natalia Kuznetsova
Russia

 

deer feeding
on our cedars
– Fall migrants

Grace De Sousa
Québec, Canada

 

driven to distraction—
the bullhorn calls
of Eurasian collared doves

Cynthia Anderson
Yucca Valley, California

 

childhood village
my endless search
for Malabar Lilly

Padma Rajeswari
Mumbai, India

 

munching eucalyptus leaves endangered koalas

Tuyet Van Do
Australia

 

March Fifteen
not swallows but buzzards
return to Hinckley

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio USA

 

panic veldt grass
a cedar seedling
seeks the sun

Helen Ogden
Pacific Grove, CA

 

a thousand wings
beating in tandem
sandhill cranes

Jenn Ryan-Jauregui
Tucson Arizona USA

 

In the pecan tree
crows mob a ruffled hawk–
border wall

Elizabeth Shack
Illinois

 

tornando a casa –
come viandante
un lupo solitario

going back home –
like a traveler
a lone wolf

Giuliana Ravaglia
Bologna (Italia)

 

big city lights
interrupt night flights
scattered bird remains

Kathleen Mazurowski
Chicago, IL

 

spring is moving in—
new at the exhibition
homes for house sparrows

Monica Kakkar
India

 

the Canadian geese
return to the park
we tread more lightly

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

quei fiordalisi
nel colore del grano…
casa d’infanzia

those cornflowers
in the color of wheat…
childhood home

Angiola Inglese
Italia

 

picnic blanket
the purple spots
on giant hogweed

Karen Morris
Scotland

 

newly arrived
femme fatale…
spotted lantern fly

David Josephsohn
US

 

new housing development—
hurried critters scatter
through the underbrush

Debbie Scheving
Bremerton WA USA

 

spring mist
moving through reeds
a snowy egret

Madeleine Kavanagh
United States

 

wandering flocks
garlic flowers bloom
in the wild yard

Sandip Chauhan
USA

 

man’s footprint
on the Pacific…
garbage patch

Stephen J. DeGuire
Los Angeles, CA

 

winter retreat
the undulating flight
of a grey wagtail

Amoolya Kamalnath
India

 

Join us next week for Carole’s commentary on additional poems…

 

 

Guest Editor Carole MacRury resides in Point Roberts, Washington, a unique peninsula and border town that inspires her work. Her poems have won awards and been published worldwide, and her photographs have been featured on the covers of numerous poetry journals and anthologies. Her practice of contemplative photography along with an appreciation of haiku aesthetics helps deepen her awareness of the world around her. Both image and written word open her to the interconnectedness of all things, to surprise, mystery and a sense of wonder. She is the author of In the Company of Crows: Haiku and Tanka Between the Tides (Black Cat Press, 2008, 2nd Printing, 2018) and The Tang of Nasturtiums, an award-winning e-chapbook (Snapshot Press 2012).

Lori Zajkowski is the Post Manager for Haiku Dialogue. A novice haiku poet, she lives in New York City.

Managing Editor Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019). Find her at: kjmunro1560.wordpress.com.

The Haiku Foundation reminds you that participation in our offerings assumes respectful and appropriate behavior from all parties. Please see our Code of Conduct policy.

Please note that all poems & images appearing in Haiku Dialogue may not be used elsewhere without express permission – copyright is retained by the creators. Please see our Copyright Policies.

Photo Credits:

Banner photo credit:
©<ahref=’https://www.123rf.com/profile_somchai20162516‘>somchai20162516</a>, <a href=’https://www.123rf.com/free-images/‘>123RF Free Images</a>

Prompt photo credit:
prompt photo two – Flora and Fauna – Carole MacRury

Haiku Dialogue offers a triweekly prompt for practicing your haiku. Posts appear each Wednesday with a prompt or a selection of poems from a previous week.

This Post Has 72 Comments

  1. A wonderful selection of haiku on an interesting topic, Carole. Congratulations to all.
    Thank you for including my green sea turtle ku.
    Warm regards,
    Gavin

    1. I was happy to see your sea turtle poem. Thanks for submitting to this prompt.

      laying eggs
      in sands that hatched her
      green sea turtle

      Gavin Austin
      Sydney, Australia

  2. Thanks to everyone for sharing your verses and many thanks Carole for the time and attention you devote to our creations!

    1. Thank you Dan. I loved the auditory feel of your lovely haiku. Not only for the whispering of the person but imagining the sound of the geese overhead too.

      waving and whispering
      Vaya Con Dios
      to migrating geese

      Dan Campbell
      Virginia

    1. Thanks for submitting your picturesque poem Steliana!

      Milk Full Moon
      the deer cub trying to get up
      in the dewy grass

      Steliana Cristina Voicu
      Ploiesti, Romania

      In English we would refer to this little creature as a ‘fawn’. :-) The Milk Full Moon resonated nicely with this new little one.

  3. Thank you so much, Carole for featuring my haiku. I am still in the learning stage!
    Congratulations to all!

  4. Thank you so much Carole for featuring my haiku. I am still in the learning stage!
    Congratulations to all!

    1. You are welcome Rashmi. Thanks for your contribution. I learned a lot myself reading through poems from around the world. I had no idea fireflies were in any sort of crisis until I read poems like yours and did a little research. I’ve always wanted to see a night filled with fireflies but unfortunately have never experienced it myself. Maybe I never will!

      Chasing fireflies
      In starlit courtyards
      A myth

      Rashmi Buragohain
      India

  5. Thanks Carole for appreciating my cornflowers…..just today I sowed some in the pots on the terrace, together with the marigolds.

    1. Hi Angiola,

      It will soon be time for me to plant a few flowers too! Cornflower where I live are often called bachelor buttons. Although there is another species similar to cornflower also called chicory.

  6. A sterling selection on migration involving flora and fauna. Many thanks ma’am for including mine.
    Loved this poignant haiku amongst others.

    refugee…
    in the only backpack
    a handful of soil

    Tsanka Shishkova
    Bulgaria

  7. Thanks, Carole, for featuring my haiku. It’s my debut in Haiku Dialogue. All the selected haiku are fantastic. Here are my top picks:

    old bluebird box
    a familiar pair starts
    the new nest

    Richard Straw
    Cary, North Carolina

    flower seller
    leaving some behind
    for the bees

    C.X. Turner
    UK

    Refugee camp –
    his only permanent
    address

    Nikola Đuretić
    Zagreb (Croatia)

    silent picnic
    lonely among the weeds
    the lady’s slipper

    Mircea Moldovan
    România

    1. Thanks for offering a few of your favorites Sandip! And welcome to Haiku Dialogue! It’s a lovely way to inspire the muse.

  8. Thank you Carole for publishing my haiku. Congratulations to all haiku poets selected. I really appreciated Jerome’s fawn yoga!

  9. Thank you Carole for including my haiku. Congrats to all the wonderful poets.

  10. Eavonka’s Ettinger’s poem resonated with its charm, bringing to light the dependence of the monarch butterfly on the milkweed plant. Amoolya Kamalnath’s poem about the wagtail and it delightful movements made me smile. There are so many others that moved me as well.

  11. Thank-you Carole for choosing my poem. I am absolutely thrilled! These poems are all such a delight. Thank-you Katherine and Lori.

  12. Dear Carole,
    Thanks so much for including my haiku in this excellent selection. My haiku represents a true story: as I was walking along the trail in 30 below celcius weather, a robin flew into a tree. It truly made me wonder why it was still here, had it been left behind in the fall migration, and also, would it survive in our frigid Whitehorse winter?

    1. Your haiku amazed me Pamela, knowing where you are from. But even not knowing, I’ve often wondered how those birds that seem to stay back survive winter. One frigid day, while visiting a bird sanctuary, a small bird landed on my hand to eat seed. I was amazed at the warmth of its feet on my horribly cold hand! So I suspect, so long as they can find food, they can keep their metabolisms going. Perhaps your little robin finally did leave. I know the hummingbirds that on occasion stay back, are often found frozen in their nests in the spring.

  13. Thank you so much for noticing my haiku, Carole! Unfortunately, this is a true story. Kaia the black stork probably even witnessed the death of her husband Karl during migration.

    1. I understood it was a true story, Urszula which is why it drew me in. There are quite a few birds that mate for life, and I just read that some birds can mourn for 2 years after losing a mate! Eventually, they get back to courting a newmate. But the idea of two years of mourning really touched me!

      1. There is a camera in Kaia and Karl’s nest. We’ll see how this story develops. Thank you very much for your comment.

  14. Thanks so much for including my ku, Carole. What a tremendous selection you’ve assembled. I love so many of these, but I’d be remiss not to mention the one that really captured my attention.

    folded
    in on itself
    fawn yoga

    Jerome Berglund
    United States

    In just 6 words, Jerome has created such a wonderful image and by naming it fawn yoga, he links to a migration of another sort. Yoga is so incredibly popular in the States, and this reminded me of goat yoga. Is it possible they’re using fawn’s now? ?

    1. Thank you so much for kind words Eavonka, your milkweed poem was so incredible, tons of unforgettable and fascinating pieces in this incredible, discerning showcase more than I can name but two others I particularly adored were Ana Drobot’s and David Josephsohn’s!! Exemplary, thrilling material so looking forward to next week’s commentaries!! ??✨

    2. Agree with you that Jerome’s fawn yoga ku is outstanding. And your milkweed one is very fine too. Congratulations!

    1. Thanks Monica! I loved your ‘spring is moving in’….here too, we build houses to encourage these tiny birds to safely breed.

  15. Turning facts into poetry is a challenge. So many of you met it head on by following your hearts and your instincts.

    Ann’s haiku shows us the sentiment behind why some plants from one country might end up in another. I feel loss of family and homesickness in this poem. The same with Margaret’s poem, where the desire to take a bit of home (seeds) to a new country is the same but with unexpected consequences. The Robina Tree has been classified a weed in certain parts of Australia. Although elsewhere it is a beautiful flowering tree.

    March
    damp shamrocks and dirt
    sent par avion

    Ann Sullivan
    Massachusetts USA

    Nona’s seeds
    from Europe
    now Robina tree in OZ

    Margaret Mahony
    Australia

    1. And these three….the first speaks to how development is taking over the habitat of wildlife. Like any reader I immediately connected Debbie’s haiku to my own experiences. Only in my case, new development released a host of nesting snakes. And the reason Nikola’s haiku made it to the long list was because after reading hundreds of haiku on flora/fauna, its negative and positive impact, I suddenly realized how lucky we are. Images of today’s refugee camps contain no flora and fauna at all, and no true home. The emptiness of this one drew me right in. Adele’s haiku really spoke to me of the hogweed I’m familiar with through her concrete portrayal of it….never ending, and do note how she ends it! ‘giant hog’.

      new housing development—
      hurried critters scatter
      through the underbrush

      Debbie Scheving
      Bremerton WA USA

      Refugee camp –
      his only permanent
      address.

      Nikola Đuretić
      Zagreb (Croatia)

      gianthogweedgianthogweedgianthog

      Adele Evershed
      Wilton, Connecticut

      1. Thank you, Carole, for the commentary. The verse originally was going to be about the coyotes hunting family pets now the forests are going, but ended up more general, with a double meaning in new housing development . My county has a growing population resulting in dozens of new neighborhoods and apartment buildings. I’m grateful to be recently moved into one of them, after being on a long wait list. Housing is an issue. But the landscape is changing. Where whole blocks of old forest once stood, thriving in our rainy environment even next to shopping centers, any day you can drive by and it’s been logged, changing the skyline, and a bit of a shock. I admit to never fully realizing how many trees there were here, until they’re gone. There are a few nature preserves but not sure where it will end. Another factor is, to prevent homeless tents, public and private properties are clearing the old trees from the corners of their properties, or leaving the tall trees and clearing all of the underbrush so there is nowhere for people, or the critters, to hide.

        1. I agree Debbie, and yes, even coyotes are being pushed out of their habitat by development. It’s the same everywhere, and in some cases, like my area, bears and cougar begin to visit our small communities, built on what was once their grounds! Dangerous encounters are becoming more frequent…

      2. Thank you for publishing my ku and your comments. It was a bit of an experiment and I’m so glad it worked!
        Among so many wonderful poems ( Jerome’s fawn and Nickola’s refugee camp)
        This one gave me an immediate image

        the Canadian geese
        return to the park
        we tread more lightly

        Sari Grandstaff
        Saugerties, NY, USA

        As well as the lovely idea of not wanting to disturb the geese I also thought of it as another year passing so the observers are aging and so ‘treading more lightly’ as they approach life’s end.

        1. Thank you Adele! I love your interpretation. You really expanded the horizons for me about my own haiku.

  16. There are many lovely haiku this week although I sometimes struggled to find the connection to migration and refugees.. This one struck me for its environmental concern:

    campfire tales –
    the big bad wolf
    on the protected list

    Ana Drobot
    Romania

    This one hits the brief on invasive species:

    migrant rabbits
    in far-off New Zealand …
    lessons unlearned

    Natalia Kuznetsova
    Russia

    This one from MR Defibaugh is on the mark too:

    vibrant jasmine
    even the national flower
    was an implant

    M. R. Defibaugh
    United States

    But I kept coming back to this clever imagery from Jerome. Great stuff:

    folded
    in on itself
    fawn yoga

    Jerome Berglund
    United States

    1. John, this prompt was about flora and fauna, not human migration Although as you can see humans have a lot to do with how certain species end up in other countries.

      I loved the image of the little fawn too, even though I am unaware of it being endangered. However, the ‘fauna/fawn’ link made me smile! .

  17. This is a wonderful collection, which, when read slowly with a finger hopping about on a map of the world, is like viewing a surrealistic TV program of worldwide travels in Nature. Imagine David Attenborough narrating these in a voiceover as cameras zoom in for close-ups and zoom out for panoramas.

    I especially like the love and charity expressed by the subject of the following poem and by the poet, both of whom are “paying it forward.”

    flower seller
    leaving some behind
    for the bees

    C.X. Turner
    UK

    P.S. Thanks, Carole, for including one of mine.

    1. Thanks for your comments, Richard. And yours, too….

      old bluebird box
      a familiar pair starts
      the new nest

      Richard Straw
      Cary, North Carolina

      What I liked about yours was the sense of time with ‘old’ bluebird box which spoke to me of the years put into watching one box in order to recognize that the same pair come back each year. It also shows ways we try to make it easier for those little birds by building them nesting boxes.

  18. And I definitely want to mention one more standout for me:

    spring mist
    moving through reeds
    a snowy egret
    — Madeleine Kavanagh
    United States

  19. Congratulations to all the poets on succinctly bringing to light both positive and negative migration issues. Stephen DeGuire’s garbage patch haiku is profound for the fact of all the plastic humans keep contributing to it. Estonia Ettinger’s milkweed haiku is a great reminder of the Monarch butterfly ‘s need for food along that migration path. My husband and I have spent years trying to get milkweed to grow for just that purpose so this Ku resonated with me. Jerome ‘s origami fawn made me smile for the image it invoked. Loved fellow Ohioan’s, Valentina, haiku about the annual celebrated return of the buzzards to Hinckley.

    I could remark on so many of these haiku, but I must look up a few animals and plants first. Thanks Carole for highlighting all of these haiku, and thanks to KJ and Lori for all your work behind the scenes keeping this column going.

    1. Thanks Nancy for shedding some light on a few haiku. I know many people trying to grow milkweed for the monarchs in Colorado. And thankfully, they’ve stopped cutting it down along park paths! While many of these stand alone as good poems, but are certainly enriched by a quick google. Water hyacinths, being one…

    2. Nancy, thank-you for commenting on my haiku. I wonder how many people outside of Ohio know that the buzzards always return to Hinkley. This year will
      be the 66th Annual Buzzard Day Festivities.

      1. I found this fascinating and looked it up for further info. How the buzzards know the exact day every year is amazing. How do they account for leap year? Thank you for teaching me something new.

        1. Debbie,
          While the buzzards (turkey vultures) do, indeed, arrive in Hinckley on March 15, they are often seen in Ohio a few days prior to that.
          They are amazing birds, cleaning up roadkill on our roads and highways. I have written several free verse poems about the buzzard including at least one haiku that was selected for Haiku Dialogue way-back-when KJ was editing the column.

    3. Hahaha, your autocorrect did not know what to do with my first name, Nan!

      Thanks so much for your comments. I couldn’t agree more on all those you mentioned.

      1. Eavonka,
        Reading the comments, I noticed the autocorrect of your name.I am so sorry. I typed it correctly. As did I here.

  20. Here I was drawn blank how n what do I post in invasive series of immigration. And as I read on and on and on ….how beautiful every piece of work is !…Carole definitely had work on hands. My favs

    summer loneliness
    less hummingbirds
    than usual

    Susan Burch

    honeysuckle
    invasion’s
    sweet side

    Marilyn Ashbaugh

    dressed to kill
    the delicate blossoms
    of water hyacinth

    Ravi Kiran

    along the flyway
    towards greener pastures
    migrating geese and me

    Ram Chandran

    pulling off a coup congress grass

    Vandana Parashar

    1. Thanks Nalini. I was amazed how poets took this prompt and turned ‘facts’ into ‘poetry. Truly grateful for those that took on the challenge. Your list of favorites show just how it’s done. Looking up ‘congress grass’ will help this one for those not knowing about it. But I love the wordplay!

      1. Thank you, Carole. I’m so glad that you liked the ku. Congress grass (Parthenium) is a native of the American tropics, but has now successfully invaded all the available space in India, to the extent of replacing native Indian weeds. It has become a menace as it causes so many respiratory issues.

    2. Thank you so much, Nalini. I agree with you that the ports have come up with really wonderful poems and Carole has made a fine selection.
      Congratulations to everyone!

  21. Each one somewhat wonderful! Here are just a few standouts for me, from the top part of the scroll.

    Serengeti
    inching forever toward the
    beginning
    — Vishal Prabhu
    India

    Romantic night…
    chasing some fireflies
    in woodblock prints
    — Ana Drobot
    Romania

    naming the fruits
    our kids have never eaten
    legacy question
    — Biswajit Mishra
    Canada

    vibrant jasmine
    even the national flower
    was an implant
    — M. R. Defibaugh
    United States

    waving and whispering
    Vaya Con Dios
    to migrating geese
    — Dan Campbell
    Virginia

    chickenpox –
    child draws
    a giraffe
    — Aljoša Vuković
    Croatia, Šibenik

  22. Thank you so much Carole for including my ku. Congratulations to all the poets featured here..

    1. You are welcome Amoolya. Here’s what I liked about yours.

      winter retreat
      the undulating flight
      of a grey wagtail

      Amoolya Kamalnath
      India

      Winter retreat brought in the human emotions as well as the fact of the wagtail’s migratory patterns. Lovely haiku. The image of the undulating flight spoke to me.

      1. Thank you for your comment on my haiku, Carole.
        I look forward to reading the short list with commentaries next week.

  23. Thank-you so very much Carole for including my haiku. Thank-you also to Kathy and Lori for all their efforts on this column. Congrats to all the poets who were selected.

    1. I enjoyed your haiku for its ‘allusion’, a technique often used by Japanese Poets. Mid March is when the swallows return to Capistrano amid much festivity, and of course, there is even a song written about this event. Love the way you brought it back to the buzzards.

      March Fifteen
      not swallows but buzzards
      return to Hinckley

      Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
      Fairlawn, Ohio USA

      1. Carole, thank-you for commenting on my haiku. Hinkley. Ohio has an official buzzard spotter and annual Buzzard Day festivities.

  24. Thank you Carole for including my haiku this week. Congratulations to all the haiku poets here! Much to appreciate here. Thank you to Kathy and Lori for keeping this wonderful haiku dialogue afloat. It is a highlight of my week. I love Ram Chandran’s and Dan Campbell’s haiku which are also about the geese. Such an astonishing variety of flora and fauna haiku. I also particularly liked this one about the much-maligned wolf in fairy tales:

    campfire tales –
    the big bad wolf
    on the protected list

    Ana Drobot
    Romania

    1. Thanks Sari,

      And yours brought a smile to my face. I admire the way you left ‘we tread more lightly’ open to reader interpretation. I myself, am very familiar with the hordes of geese, and geese poop that cover the parks and lawns in Colorado each year. Step lightly indeed! :-)

      the Canadian geese
      return to the park
      we tread more lightly

      Sari Grandstaff
      Saugerties, NY, USA

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