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HAIKU DIALOGUE – door to door – revolving door

door to door

With a nod to ‘Haiku Windows’, a past feature from when I first began this column, & also an idea suggested a long time ago by poet Laurie Greer, for the next several weeks we will explore some concepts relating to doors. Be inspired by these prompts – I can’t wait to read where they take you – & please note that there is no requirement to include the words of the prompt in the poems… enjoy! kj

next week’s theme: doorstep

If something or someone is ‘on the doorstep’ it is very close – this is the step leading up to the outer door of your house…

I look forward to reading your submissions.

The deadline is midnight Pacific Daylight Time, Saturday April 17, 2021.

Please use the Haiku Dialogue submission form below to enter one or two original unpublished haiku inspired by the week’s theme, and then press Submit to send your entry. (The Submit button will not be available until the Name, Email, and Place of Residence fields are filled in.) With your poem, please include any special formatting requirements & your name as you would like it to appear in the column. A few haiku will be selected for commentary each week. Please note that by submitting, you agree that your work may appear in the column – neither acknowledgment nor acceptance emails will be sent. All communication about the poems that are posted in the column will be added as blog comments.

below is the commentary for revolving door:

This week a few poets were influenced by the banner photo rather than the actual prompt – this was identified as a risk when we were setting up the post – & if good poetry results, there is nothing lost. The selected poems, however, all revolve around the prompt…

revolving door…
pushed around
by strangers

     Laurie Greer
     Washington DC

How timely – of course in a revolving door we can be literally pushed around by strangers, but in this time of social media, its anonymity, & the plethora of opinion, this poem may be referring to the way the comments on social media so often deteriorate into personal attacks…

 

HA HA my grandson
ha ha HA through HA HA ha
the revolving door

     Maxianne Berger
     Montreal

Several poems address sound & the revolving door – here upper & lower-case letters indicate the fluctuation of volume, & the reader can easily picture the delightful scene. One could consider centering this poem to add an additional visual element, & to emphasize the central axis around which the grandson is moving…

 

my ups and downs revolving door

    Olivier Schopfer
    Geneva, Switzerland

A nice contrast of movement – the up & down versus the round & round – in very few words, as well as the suggestion of a person’s continually changing mood…

 

roundabout
we argue
in circles

     Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
     Fairlawn, Ohio USA

Here the poet takes two unrelated concepts – a traffic circle or carousel & an argument – & links them by emphasizing something they have in common. Further to this, people often disagree about routes & directions – is a back-seat driver involved?

 

a mother’s life revolving door

     Vandana Parashar
     India

It can often seem that parenting is a whirlwind of activity – whether caring for babies, toddlers, or school-aged children – & as the children get older, the door to the house can become a revolving door with people coming & going all the time. A mother is often characterized as putting others’ needs ahead of her own, caring for & nurturing her family ahead of everything else. In this poem, maybe the mother herself is the revolving door – it is an interesting take on the stages of a life…

& here are the rest of my selections:

revolving door…
she finally decides
to stay the same

     Agus Maulana Sunjaya
     Tangerang, Indonesia

 

one turtle falls
from a rolling log…
another climbs on

     Al Gallia
     Lafayette, Louisiana

 

spring again
the unseen
stirring

     Alan Peat
     Biddulph, United Kingdom

 

entranced I watch
their antics round and round
too many squirrels

     Albert Schepers
     Windsor, Ontario, Canada

 

revolving door
the children’s laughter
comes round again

     Alex Fyffe
     United States

 

red rose –
opening the door
of her heart

     Aljoša Vuković
     Šibenik, Croatia

 

childhood –
the doors close
after a short while

     Amrutha Prabhu
     India

 

revolving door –
all those pages
in my diary

     Ana Drobot
     Romania

 

fog here and there –
colors and outlines
they come and go

     Angiola Inglese
     Italia

 

climbing up
the rockface door
a slimy snail and its shadow

     Anna Yin
    Ontario, Canada

 

revolving door –
the world that waits
on the other side

     Arvinder Kaur
     Chandigarh, India

 

painted rocks
a migrant child escapes
through a fairy door

     Babs McGrory
     Delaware

 

revolving door –
my shadow
slips away

     Barrie Levine
     Wenham MA USA

 

new faces
old hyperbole –
election cycle

     Bona M. Santos
     Los Angeles, CA

 

revolving door
one more time around
for the fly

     Bryan Rickert
     Belleville, Illinois USA

 

bouncing
from house to house
foster kids

     Carol Judkins
     Carlsbad, CA

 

in the interim
I practice oneness

     Carol Reynolds
    Australia

 

open air theater
out of the blue
a nightingale

     cezar-florin ciobîcă
     Romania

 

locking
the revolving door
retirement

     Charlotte Hrenchuk
     Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada

 

seeking a way out
I find a way in
enso

     Cristina Povero
     Italy

 

my timing
not quite right –
revolving door

     Cynthia Anderson
     Yucca Valley, California

 

my reflection –
trembling
in a mountain stream

     Dan Campbell
     Virginia

 

carousel horses –
looking at his smile
anyway

     Daniela Misso
     Italy

 

there and back again
the life long journey
of eels

     Deborah Karl-Brandt
     Bonn, Germany

 

Thick clouds
circling in the sky
gray pigeons

     Dejan Ivanovic
     Lazarevac, Serbia

 

magic –
the way doors open
for her

     Dorothy Burrows
     United Kingdom

 

antique shop
rare and collectible
former friends reminisce

     Dottie Piet
     Tulsa, OK

 

starting over again
running out of time
to get it right

     Edna Beers
     USA

 

beyond the door
plum petals
above the road

     Elisa Allo
     Switzerland

 

night captures
the weary soul
dawn pounding the door

     Germina Melius
     Saint Lucia

 

Eucalyptus scent –
playing hide and seek
with my childhood memories

     Hassane Zemmouri
     Algeria

 

covid out on parole…
round and round we go

     Helen Buckingham
     United Kingdom

 

going in the out door
finding myself
on the other side

    Helen Ogden
    Pacific Grove, CA

 

blindfold
the nowhere escape
of the millstone donkey

     Ingrid Baluchi
     North Macedonia

 

revolving door…
reflective fragments
of autumn dawn

     Ivan Gaćina
    Zadar, Croatia

 

spring breezes
through the open door
people come and go

     John Daleiden
    Phoenix, Arizona in the Sonoran Desert

 

Ritz entry
round and round
my brother and me

     John S Green
     Bellingham, WA

 

thief arrested –
a front door
and another exit…

     Jorge Alberto Giallorenzi
     Chivilcoy.Bs. As. Argentina

 

child migrant
crossing the border –
a dead Texas cactus

     Julia Guzmán
     Córdoba Argentina

 

the deckhand
now a skipper
. . . new hat

     Kanjini Devi
     The Far North, Aotearoa NZ

 

you can’t slam
a revolving door…
recurring dreams

     Karen Harvey
     Pwllheli, Wales

 

dad’s exit
the lost carousel
of my childhood

     Kath Abela Wilson
     United States

 

open french doors…
wisteria scented
moonlight

     Kathleen Vasek Trocmet
     Texas, USA

 

long leave…
a pebble heart awaits me
on my desk

     Kavitha Sreeraj
     Hyderabad, India

 

town clock
the mechanical dolls’
languid walk

     Keiko Izawa
     Japan

 

the ebb and flow
of the tides –
a revolving door

     Lafcadio
     USA

 

the sky folds
and unfolds the moon…
the fortnights

     Lakshmi Iyer
     India

 

detritus bobs
in and out on the tide
glass ceiling

     Louise Hopewell
     Australia

 

open-sky wells –
the profound colors I reach
through your eyes

     Luisa Santoro
     Rome, Italy

 

unfinished story
another turn
at the brass ring

     Margaret Walker
     Lincoln, NE, USA

 

summer camping –
the door always open
to the stars

campeggio estivo –
la porta sempre aperta
alle stelle

     Maria Teresa Piras
     Serrenti – Italia

 

wormhole
pushing at the open
door

     Mark Gilbert
     UK

 

old hare
between the dappled roots
an opening

     martin gottlieb cohen
     Egg Harbor, NJ United States

 

invisible
in a vast world
roots of a tree

     Mary Vlooswyk
     Calgary, AB

 

old cathedral
the signs for the pilgrims
coming and going

     Maya Daneva
     The Netherlands

 

his constant back and forth
through the building entrance
dementia

     Melanie Vance
     USA

 

revolving door
taking the long way up
to the office

     Michael Henry Lee
     Saint Augustine Florida

 

revolving door…
we lock our eyes
through the glass

     Milan Rajkumar
     Imphal, India

 

in and out
through the same revolving door
no alternatives

     Mirela Brăilean
     Romania

 

in and out the revolving door corporate jungle

     Neena Singh
     Chandigarh, India

 

revolving door –
swept away like dust
my angry thoughts

     Nicole Pottier
     France

 

moving day
sun on the floorboards
all that’s left

     P. H. Fischer
     Vancouver, Canada

 

it’s cancer
I stare
at the revolving door

     Padma Rajeswari
     Mumbai, India

 

problem
trapped in the revolving door
each section holds

     paul geiger
     sebastopol ca

 

in one door today
out another tomorrow
teenagers

     Peggy Hale Bilbro
     Huntsville, Alabama

 

stuck in a revolving door second lockdown

     Pere Risteski
     North Macedonia

 

old tree house –
the memory bigger
on the inside

     Pippa Phillips
     United States

 

my ex –
he asks to return
between each girlfriend

     Pris Campbell
     Lake Worth, FL USA

 

supermarket
T shirts and saris vie
revolving door

     Radhamani sarma
     Chennai

 

memories
from sakura to sakura
they travel

     Refika Dedić
     Bihać, Bosnia and Herzegovina

 

child watches
the tiny door all day
fairy house

     Rehn Kovacic
     Mesa, AZ

 

on the hinges
of his words
my morn pivots

     Richa Sharma
     India

 

returning to pick another daisy

     Robert Kingston
     UK

 

revolving door –
my little girl holds
her little girl

     Roberta Beary
     County Mayo, Ireland

 

a wink of door
in the tree trunk
wren comes knocking

     Ron Scully
     Manchester NH

 

coming and going…
his love words
lost in the wind

     Rosa Maria Di Salvatore
     Italy

 

poor Alice
scaling the urge to knock
or run away

     Sandra St-Laurent
     Yukon, Canada

 

the Super Balls revolving
around my son’s
science project

     Sari Grandstaff
     Saugerties, NY

 

a tiny door
hooked to an old tree
imagine the coming out

     Shelley Baker-Gard
     Portland, Or

 

seeing my smile
I am asked to leave
the warmth of the grocer

     simonj
     UK

 

cancer clinic
through the revolving door
the footsteps in and out

     Stephen A. Peters
     Bellingham, Wa. USA

 

revolving door
at O’hare
excitement–jet lag–excitement–jet lag

     Susan Farner
     United States

 

after Easter sale
at Trader Joe’s the lilies
give way to roses

     Susan Rogers
     Los Angeles, CA United States

 

in the echo
of a revolving door…
her promotion

     Sushama Kapur
     Pune, India

 

spring park –
screams revolving with
a merry-go-round

     Teiichi Suzuki
     Japan

 

swinging door –
I learn to
unlearn

     Teji Sethi
     India

 

runway
the easy way out
brings me back in

     Tim Cremin
     Massachusetts

 

revolving door –
a maple seed lands on
the hotel’s carpet

     Tomislav Maretić
     Zagreb, Croatia

 

surprise promotion
once more I’m pushed
in the wrong direction

     Tracy Davidson
     Warwickshire, UK

 

a lot of obligations
outside the revolving door
my dreamworld

     Tsanka Shishkova
     Bulgaria

 

spring weekend
between our silence
sound of buzzing bees

     Uma Anandalwar
     India

 

doors slow down to growls snow blossoms

     Victor Ortiz
     Bellingham, WA, USA

 

in my heart
there are those who enter
there are those who go out

     Vincenzo Adamo
     Sicily Italy

 

drawing ensō…
the invisible door
between two breaths

     Vladislav Hristov
     Bulgaria

 

old spice sweeping
through revolving doors
homeless man

     Wendy C. Bialek
     az, usa

 

integration cruise
at the swaying table
forks and chopsticks

     Wiesław Karliński
     Namysłów, Poland

 

Lori Zajkowski is the Post Manager for Haiku Dialogue. A novice haiku poet, she lives in New York City.

Managing Editor Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019). Find her at: kjmunro1560.wordpress.com.

The Haiku Foundation reminds you that participation in our offerings assumes respectful and appropriate behavior from all parties. Please see our Code of Conduct policy.

Please note that all poems & images appearing in Haiku Dialogue may not be used elsewhere without express permission – copyright is retained by the creators. Please see our Copyright Policies.

This Post Has 32 Comments

  1. Congratulations to all the poets in this week’s thought-provoking and eclectic column. Many thanks to KJ for your insightful commentary and to Lori for all the administration. I am delighted to have a poem included! There were so many imaginative takes on this week’s theme, it is difficult to select a favourite. One of the many I enjoyed was…

    moving day
    sun on the floorboards
    all that’s left

    P. H. Fischer
    Vancouver, Canada

    I thought this was a lovely take on the ‘revolving doors’ theme and captured something of both the excitement and sadness of house moving. I loved the image of ‘sun on the floorboards’ – it beautifully captures the happy memories that can be associated with a home.

    I look forward to reading next week’s selection.

  2. Thank you, kjmunro, for selecting my poem to be in this week’s Dialogue. It is always an honor to be included among so many wonderful writers. I’ll try to contribute a little to the discussion here.
    .
    seeking a way out
    I find a way in
    enso

    Cristina Povero
    Italy
    .
    Povero’s poem plays with the theme of “revolving doors” by ending the first two lines with “out” and “in” and grounding the idea in the zen image of the enso. But instead of going in circles and trapping her, the enso draws her inward to some realization beyond the desire to escape.
    .
    going in the out door
    finding myself
    on the other side

    Helen Ogden
    Pacific Grove, CA
    .
    Ogden’s haiku takes a humorous approach to a similar idea, that of finding herself in an unexpected way, by poking fun at the labeling of doors as either “in” or “out” when every door’s function is to allow access both ways. Despite going through the wrong door, the “out door,” she still ends up on the other side, not mysteriously back outside again, despite the door’s warning. The poem suggests that some things are not what they seem and that we should realize things as they are, not as they are labeled to be. There is also the subversive element of breaking societal norms in order to discover deeper truths about the world.
    .
    town clock
    the mechanical dolls’
    languid walk

    Keiko Izawa
    Japan
    .
    The use of sound in this poem supports the theme of being caught in a routine of tiresome repetition. The “town clock” of the first line is two stressed syllables, forcing the mouth to open wide and slowly enunciate each word. The rhythm speeds up slightly in the second line, but the consonance connecting “clock” to “mechanical” and the assonance connecting “clock” to “dolls'” mimics the musicality of a town clock exceptionally well, and this lyrical quality continues into the slant rhyme in line three, “walk.” The choice of “mechanical dolls’,” mere toys without wills of their own, prepares us, too, for the weary tone brought to light in their “languid walk.” Like the repetition of the C and L sounds throughout the poem, there is music to be found in our day-to-day lives, but sometimes it can feel like we’re just pawns to the numbers on the clock, moved about without any say in the matter.

  3. I’m wondering how some of these submissions made it in as a traditional Haiku should follow the syllable count of 5-7-5. The majority, if not all, of these submissions, don’t follow that. I don’t mean to sound insensitive. I’m just curious as 5-7-5 is what I’ve always been taught and what I teach my students.

    1. Christopher, many ask that very question. But let’s say that haiku poets writing in English (as well as haiku poets in Japan) have long recognized that syllables in English are not the equivalent of the sound units counted in Japanese. A simple example would be the English word “strengths” which is a monosyllable in English, but six (6) sound units if counted as do the Japanese. As to “evidence” that even in Japan 5-7-5 is English is not required (fewer is preferable) .. you might wish to look at the winners of the international section of the haiku contest run every year by the Mainichi newspaper ..
      https://cdn.mainichi.jp/vol1/2021/04/14/20210414p2a00m0et001000q/0.pdf
      btw, the word “hike” in English is a single syllable. This is more or less the actual pronunciation in Japanese of the word “haiku,” which in Japanese is three (3) sound units.
      Other aspects of haiku are more focused on than are syllables .. the essence of haiku, and the juxtaposition.
      I’m not sure this explanation helps as I am responding to a “why” question and not a “what” or “how, then” question.
      As for mine, yes, 5-7-5, it was simply to *limit* how long I might have been tempted to make it 😉
      Be well and be safely,
      Maxianne
      Maxianne

    2. thanks so much for your comment, Christopher, & Maxianne for your response as well… I am no expert, but I recommend this essay by Michael Dylan Welch:
      https://sites.google.com/site/nahaiwrimo/home/why-no-5-7-5
      & along with Maxianne’s suggestion, I would encourage reading the many journals of English-language haiku available to see examples of the work that is currently being published in this amazing poetry genre! cheers, kj

  4. The revolving door of Haiku Dialogue… each week sharing and caring. Thank you all…..

    revolving door —
    all those pages
    in my diary

    Ana Drobet
    Romania

    Really relate to this one….. well done Ana and everyone.

  5. Thanks so much for including mine, KJ and Lori and congratulations to all for a great bunch of ku. I’m with Peggy re Roberta Beary’s – I love everything about it – the shape brings to mind the image of a revolving door, and the apparent simplicity and singsong use of repetition belie its many layers. Another veritable Tardis of a poem from Dr. Ku.

  6. Dear kj & Lori,

    So happy to feature in Haiku Dialogue with such talented haijin.

    Thoroughly enjoyed reading the poems & the commentary. So many memorable ku.

    Grateful to THF team for giving us this joy of connecting through the common thread of haiku prompts.

    Warm regards,
    Neena

  7. Thank you, Pris for your comment on my poem! There are several including yours and Kath Abela Wilson’s that caught my eye. I’ll comment further in a bit.

  8. What a great selection of poems responding to an interesting prompt! Kudos to all the writers. I am proud to be included with everyone else. These three are stand-outs for me.

    the sky folds
    and unfolds the moon…
    the fortnights
    Lakshmi Iyer
    India

    Perfect word picture of flitting clouds.
    ….
    one turtle falls
    from a rolling log…
    another climbs on
    Al Gallia
    Lafayette, Louisiana

    This one brought a chuckle. I’ve seen this and sometimes I feel like I’m on that rolling log!
    ….
    revolving door –
    my little girl holds
    her little girl
    Roberta Beary
    County Mayo, Ireland

    Beautiful image of how life rolls on.

  9. Thank you, kj and team, for the work you put into this each week, and for including one of mine. It’s always an honour…and thank you, Laurie, for noticing it.
    Your haiku was indeed timely and inspired, as kj comments…

    revolving door…
    pushed around
    by strangers

    Laurie Greer
    Washington DC

    We seem to be passing through a period lacking in courtesy, tolerance and understanding, especially worrying now when we all need to be kind and supportive.

  10. Thank you, Kathy and the Haiku team for these weekly challenge so that I can continue having a lot of fun to write haiku and reading haiku… A great selection as always with wonderful inspirations. Thanks. I will try to come here every week!

  11. I loved the selection this week on what I thought was a difficult theme. I would mention Maxianne Berger’s amazing and innovative ‘HA HA my grandson’, Padme Rajeswari’s stunning ‘it’s cancer’, and Kathleen Vasek Trocnet’s ‘open french doors’ which I just love.

  12. Kathy, thanks for the comment ☺ .. well, thanks for *all* the comments ☺…
    and thank you, poets, for the pleasure of reading ..

  13. Thanks to kj for the wonderful comments–and to the whole amazing THF crew who keep this going. So many great poems this week I don’t know where to start –the variety alone was dizzying! Especially loved Maxianne’s audio, Cristina Povero’s enso, Dorothy Burrows’ magic, Ingrid Baluchi’s donkey, and Mark Gilbert’s wormhole. But really loved them all.

    1. Many thanks, Laurie, for mentioning my poem. I am delighted that you enjoyed it! I really liked yours too and KJ’s commentary. For me, it reminded me how much I miss visiting museums. One of my favourite museums has a wonderful revolving door and in normal times it would be invariably packed with visitors. In this context, being pushed around by strangers used to be a very positive experience! Thank you also for giving KJ the idea for this theme. It’s a fascinating topic!

  14. Dear Kjmunro and Lori Zajkowski,

    To be among my fellow colleagues and poets through the medium of the foundation is a meditative journey for me in these trying times. We do not have wings but we flock together with these series of dialogues.
    Thank you again.

    Warm regards,

    Milan Rajkumar
    Imphal, India

  15. THF is a wonderful place to be. Thank you Lori, for managing all our Haiku Dialogue posts. Thank you Katherine, for the humongous job of reading through all the posts and filtering it for acknowledgement. I am humbled and honored to have mine on the list. Thank you THF for the opportunity!

  16. Welcome back to editing the column, Kathy. Thank-you so very much for selecting mine for commentary. Thank-you also to Lori. Congrats to all the poets.

  17. Dear Lori Zajkowski and Katherine Munro, greetings, thanks for featuring mine. Congratulations to all the poets in this selection and also for the great commentaries. In these poems, there are so many beautiful and memorable images and the column was a joy to read. I particularly enjoyed reading Agus Maulana Sunjaya ’s and Kath Abela Wilson’s poems:
    .

    revolving door…
    she finally decides
    to stay the same

    Agus Maulana Sunjaya
    Tangerang, Indonesi
    .
    dad’s exit
    the lost carousel
    of my childhood

    Kath Abela Wilson
    United States

  18. So many ones I enjoyed.

    These caught my eye especially….

    revolving door
    one more time around
    for the fly

    Bryan Rickert

    unfinished story
    another turn
    at the brass ring

    Margaret Walker

    dad’s exit
    the lost carousel
    of my childhood

    Kath Abela Wilson

    my reflection –
    trembling
    in a mountain stream

    Dan Campbell

  19. Thank you so much Kathy for including my haiku this week! Thank you to Marietta for her awesome work on this feature the previous few weeks also. Thank you Lori for managing the posts on Haiku Dialogue. I have always appreciated this Haiku Dialogue and the connection with haiku poets around the world. Even more so during this global pandemic. I love this one that you commented on by Laurie Greer.
    revolving door…
    pushed around
    by strangers

    Laurie Greer
    Washington DC
    And these two haiku by Tracy and Peggy. These three haiku and others this week really say a lot to me yet use everyday simple language. This is one of the aspects of haiku that I marvel at.
    surprise promotion
    once more I’m pushed
    in the wrong direction

    Tracy Davidson
    Warwickshire, UK

    in one door today
    out another tomorrow
    teenagers

    Peggy Hale Bilbro
    Huntsville, Alabama

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