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HAIKU DIALOGUE – Turn of the Decade – The Next Ten Years

 

Turn of the Decade

Our lives are constantly changing. We change careers, relationships, and even hobbies. We can gain the entire world and lose everything we have, sometimes all within one year… so what about ten? Over the next four weeks we will delve into the past, present, and future to evaluate our individuality in life’s journey. Although I will provide prompting questions with each week’s theme, I encourage you to dig deep and allow your moments to be authentic. We all have different experiences and that’s what makes life beautiful.

For the month of December, each poet may send one or two haiku/senryu on the week’s theme via our Contact Form.

There will be a selection process in which I will briefly comment on a few of the selected pieces.

The haiku appear in the order in which we receive them.

My next theme is Holiday Memory.

Christmas has always been my favorite holiday and I have many memories, both good and bad. As you reminisce about the previous decade, is there a holiday memory you’re particularly fond of? Is there someone you’ve lost over the last ten years who can live on through haiku? Tell me the good, the bad, the sad, and the funny. For those who celebrate Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, or another wintery holiday, I want those experiences too!

The deadline is midnight EST, Saturday December 21, 2019.

Turn of the Decade – The Next Ten Years

The future is full of dreams, hope, and love, and this week’s cull proves just that! I extend my sincerest thanks to everyone who submitted this week. There are many gems and I hope you enjoy them as much as I do! We’re halfway through this series and I look forward to reading more wonderful poems over the next two weeks.

forget what
the future holds
snowflakes

Olivier Schopfer, Switzerland

What a serene image that’s presented in this haiku. There is something so peaceful about watching the snowflakes fall. All of life’s problems just seem to fade away. When thinking about the future, people tend to fall into three patterns: planning ahead, anxiety about life’s uncertainties, and having a “go with the flow” kind of attitude. If there’s one thing that 2019 has taught me, it’s that no matter how much you plan in life, you can lose everything at once. This haiku is a gorgeous reminder that sometimes you just need to let it all go and make the best of whatever life throws at you.

open up more to the intrusiveness of others

aprirsi di più all’invadenza degli altri

Angela Giordano
Italy

One thing that I love about this piece is how, although it’s a phrase, it can have multiple interpretations. Not only that, but it’s an important message. Yes, we deal with people in life that might not be the easiest to deal with, but there is something about being more open to those that makes this haiku absolutely beautiful. This poet is stepping out of her comfort zone, and I think that’s something we should all do every once in awhile. It’s how we grow.

tarot deck
I make peace
with the irreversible

Shloka Shankar

As someone who’s quite familiar with tarot cards, I have to say that I just love this! Not only is there a literal meaning of making peace with things we cannot change, but in doing tarot readings, sometimes you pull cards that are upside down, called reversed tarot cards. These cards are not always bad news, but many times can be interpreted as such. This haiku is relatable and clever, but also another stunning reminder that sometimes we just need to let it all go and learn to find good, even in the bad.

Here are the rest of my selections:

mirror of future
growing wisdom on my face
and no beauty to lose

Jackie Chou
Pico Rivera, CA USA

 

cancer diagnosis i foil wrap my banana ends

B Shropshire
(USA)

 

in the mirror the words
I can’t take back
along the way

Stephen Peters

 

memento mori
postpone nothing
live my best life

joel

 

the ability
to feel joy again
north wind

Christina Sng
Singapore

 

the next ten years
those cruises takes the world closer to me

Nuky Kristijono
Indonesia

 

second time fired
senior woman
seeks ikigai

nancy liddle

 

The next ten years
Day by day I will survive
like a plum blossom

Dennys Cambarau
Italy

 

next ten years –
admiring the same smiles
as always

Daniela Misso

 

to light–
birthday candles
for grandma

Pravat Kumar Padhy

 

in ten years
mom and dad are celebrating
golden wedding

Zdenka Mlinar
CROATIA

 

moon viewing
and other important things
retirement

Rehn Kovacic

 

the next ten years
a cystoscopy a colonoscopy
etc

Aljoša Vuković

 

her continuous ranting..
now make some money
from poetry

R.Suresh Babu
India

 

soon-to-be-mom
the newspaper marked
for work from home jobs

Vandana Parashar

 

in ten years…
how many friends
on facebook?

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

seasons turn
walking along the old dust road
into winter

john hawkhead

 

embracing all
leaving some
forgetting none

Saša Slavković
Slovenia

 

in a decade
not decayed
trampoline

Ronald K. Craig

 

summoning
the apostrophe
back from the wilderness

Sheila Barksdale

 

counting down the years
till I’m the same age
mother died

Peggy Hale Bilbro

 

after a decade
my arthritis cures-
robot

Ljiljana Dobra
Šibenik Croatia

 

fireplace crackling
grandpa and his precious
in the rocking chair

Franjo Ordanic

 

grave site selected
who will receive the medals
great-grandfather earned

Pris Campbell

 

art colony thriving
sans watercolors –
poets without easels

Roberta Beach Jacobson, USA

 

next decade
some more wine that
turns into water…

Adrian Bouter

 

retirement dreams
apartment city living
with lakeside views

Kathleen Mazurowski

 

rippling kindness
spent dandelions
departing airily

Christina Pecoraro

 

saliva swab —
my sister’s risk
is higher

Roberta Beary
County Mayo Ireland

 

next ten years
becoming a mother
to my mother

Richa Sharma

 

above the fog
along with you
another ten autumns

Helga Stania
Switzerland

 

Stones of pas –
in the flowing water
clouds and me

Nazarena Rampini
Italy

 

the next ten years
a more time to spend
in nature

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

final party plans complete

Margaret Walker

 

retirement –
that stick for two,
all for me…

pensionamento –
quel bastone per due,
tutto per me…

Maria Teresa Piras

 

life coach
at the senior center
my first day

Pat Davis

 

pollinator garden
a future on the scale
of a butterfly’s wings

Laurie Greer
Washington DC

 

birthday candles
another wish to fade
her pain

Rich Schilling
Webster Groves, MO

 

the wind blows
in the abandoned house –
same as last year

Benedetta Cardone

 

retiring…
the creeping spread
of the perennial bed

Michele L. Harvey

 

plant a trillion
trees worldwide
stop climate change

Christina Chin

 

after PhD
my last degree
to serve God

Adjei Agyei-Baah

 

uncertainty
how long will the heart
and breath tango

Minal Sarosh
Ahmedabad, India

 

whatever will be
will be
our legacy

Debbie Scheving

 

perhaps
they’ll return at my window
the sparrows gran loved

( sparrows have become extinct in north India due to mindless urbanisation and lack of emotional connect )

arvinder Kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

goodwill
health and peace
for our planet

Ingrid Baluchi
(Macedonia)

 

The Complete
Mary Blue: a haiku bio
of mom

Kath Abela Wilson

 

new pond…
monks plant sakura trees
along the path

Tsanka Shishkova

 

another decade…
new narratives
of the same old life

Hifsa Ashraf
Pakistan

 

fingers crossed
at what life gives…
que sera sera

Madhuri Pillai

 

hard to swallow
today’s polypill
perched on my tongue

Mark Gilbert
UK

 

golden years
we hold the tiller
hard right

Robert Kingston

 

a face in the mirror wrinkles deeper

Susan Beth Furst

 

garden gautama
abiding among lotus flowers
and a gentle rain

Steve Tabb

 

poetry pays
for the first time ever
— Social Security

Autumn Noelle Hall

 

retirement day
on a no traffic road
I slow down

Srinivasa Rao Sambangi

 

first step on Mars
my bucket list
grows longer

John Green

 

this Christmas cactus
will outlast my sorry ass
and blossom, hopefully

Ron Scully

 

final decade(s)
downsizing to zero
emissions

Janice Munro

 

at Mt. Shasta’s feet
heaps of whatever falls
sea of clouds

Clysta Seney

 

the endgame —
leaving a dying planet
for another world

Mark Meyer

 

eyes to read
breath to write
an earth to flourish

wendy c. bialek

 

all hands on deck
aid is needed
new decade

Charles Harmon
Los Angeles, California, USA

 

ruby wedding anniversary
a journey to Spain
winter sunset

Tomoko Nakata

 

first day of retirement…
the jigsaw pieces
fall into place

Theresa A. Cancro
Wilmington, Delaware USA

 

retirement
I learn to say
no

Nancy Brady
Huron, Ohio

 

fall colors
I refuse to
turn to

Srinivasa Rao Sambangi

 

sweet celebration
after decades of labor
my first book is born

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Lori Zajkowski is the Post Manager for Haiku Dialogue. A novice haiku poet, she lives in New York City.

Guest editor Lori A Minor is a feminist, mental health advocate, and body positive activist currently living in Norfolk, Virginia. She is the editor of #FemkuMag. Most recently, Lori gave a presentation on social awareness in haiku at Haiku North America 2019.

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019).

 

 

This Post Has 59 Comments

  1. uncertainty
    how long will the heart
    and breath tango
    .
    Minal Sarosh
    .
    Loved tango at the end. Life requires so many physical and emotional systems to work together.
    *
    eyes to read
    breath to write
    an earth to flourish
    .
    wendy c. bialek
    .
    Brief and can represent the power of the pen in “to flourish”.
    *
    first day of retirement…
    the jigsaw pieces
    fall into place
    .
    Theresa A. Cancro
    .
    I enjoyed the double meaning here. Time to finish that puzzle, and all the life choices and planning that leads up to that day finally fall into place.
    *
    perhaps
    they’ll return at my window
    the sparrows gran loved
    .
    arvinder kaur
    .
    Lovely. Hoping for the health and return of the birds, while remembering the gran.

    1. thanks for your comments on all these poems, debbie.

      i meant “flourish” in all ways you can wonder about!

      knowing that without our earth’s survival….nothing else matters.

      with it then all and endless possibilities exist to expand and grow and ……..

  2. I absolutely am enjoying the spirited conversation that has been born from the posts of poems in this series….of lori minor…in addition to the opportunity to place into poignant words the issues that are of concern.
    *
    thank you lori for including mine and giving this series.
    *
    I have been busy learning the art of renku, and trying to heal from an upper-resp. infection….and just turned in on the haiku dialogue to read, and respond….and see what’s up….
    .
    yes,
    i can never separate myself from my heart-felt environmental responsibilities for the time i have left on this earth.
    doing all i can do to keep it fit to sustain life.
    *
    my question, (i pose to autumn and gary but not limited to them) is after/should/when/ the time comes and this world “is” clean and green…..who will teach us to live peaceably on it?

    *
    my next submitted poem (before reading the new dialogues between gary and autumn) ironically, appears to address gently, this issue.

  3. John Hawkhead’s contribution:

    season’s turn
    walking along the old dust road
    into winter

    has a traditional approach using a natural setting to express his views of the future. “the old dust road” – a country setting that could be in any part of the world. “season’s turn” – most areas of the world have some kind of seasonal change, and most have a winter of sorts. This haiku has the most universal resonance.

    Judith Hishikawa

  4. Dear Loris, Thank you for your work on this project and for selecting my haiku The prompt “where do you want to be in ten years” called me. I was born near Mt Shasta: an active, high alert volcano hosting glaciers and the headland waters for the Sacramento River. So besides checking for climate change (sea of clouds is a summer kigo in California) and whatever might be falling I was going home. Appreciation to you both for your inspiration.

  5. my thanks to Lori Zajkowski and Lori A Minor for appreciating my work and for the wonderful commentary that accompanies it, congratulations to Olivier and Shloka and all the participants

  6. Reading these, one would not think the world faced a climate emergency. Such optimism! Haiku poets here seem to live in a world or their own.

    ten years from now
    Greta ten years closer
    to the end

    1. Hey, Garry–in case you missed it, you might want to go back and check out the HAIKU DIALOGUE – Social Issues – Climate Change feature here :

      https://www.thehaikufoundation.org/2019/12/04/wednesday-dec-4-post/

      After a couple months of reading poets’ posts here, I’m pretty sure it’s safe to assume that most of us are in knots about the Climate Emergency 24/7. The criteria for this Next Ten Years Call seemed to point us inward, towards more personal reflection. Other poems which concerned the the Climate Crisis may have been submitted; but those chosen reflect the curator’s criteria and sensibilities.
      *
      That said, I really like your senryu. Greta is my hero for our times. Seeing her standing next to my life-long hero, Jane Goodall (whom I’ve personally met on two occasions, having served as a founder and coordinator for one of her Roots and Shoots Youth Groups) was occasion for celebration. Age wise, if I placed myself between them, we could represent a sort of Triple Goddess–Maiden, Mother, Crone.
      *
      Make no mistake, if Mother Earth is to be healed, it will be by the Feminine. Hell hath no fury…like Greta Thunberg.
      *
      Thank you for calling to mind the Climate Crisis with such a powerful poem.
      *
      ~Autumn

      1. autumn….i hear your passion, but wonder, does it really matter what the gender is?

        i am just looking for the right person for the job…..

        i would not vote for someone based on gender/nationality/religion/sexual preference/colour of skin/ age/etc…..no matter how messed up and dusty the globe he has handed to me!
        *
        michael jackson surely sang a good song…but he couldn’t unfortunately, heal himself.
        *
        when people of the pita movement bite on other people’s heads to protect “animal” rights
        *
        when religion after religion kill people on the grounds of religious beliefs
        *
        when abortion centers become targets on the born in the name of protecting the unborn
        *
        this kind of protest is it the answer?
        *
        how do we become examples for the behavior we want….without repeating behavior we don’t want?

        1. No, the gender doesn’t matter. By “the feminine,” I do not mean “a woman,” but a way of being. In the study of the Tao de Jing and the I Ching, the Taiji (also called the YinYang) represents the energies of the masculine Yang and the feminine Yin (the Two born of the One). The Yang is the active, creative energy associated with Heaven (not in the Christian sense, but in the “realm of light” sense–think about how all life on Earth relies upon the sun). The Yin is the nurturing, receptive energy associated with the Earth (the dark place where the seed is nurtured so that it can be born and grow). They are both ever-present and necessary, and they are meant to be brought into proper balance with one another, as is appropriate to the situation–sometimes more Yin is called for, other times, more Yang.
          *
          Similarly , in Jungian thought, we each contain both energies–women have an inner masculine (Animus), men and inner feminine (Anima). Wholeness demands we embrace and honor both sides. Unfortunately, our primary (and in particular Western) way of being in the world has been long-dominated by a controlling, conquering masculine that is not in proper relation to its own inner feminine. This needs to be brought back into balance, not by “putting a woman in charge,” but by having each individual take responsibility for bringing their own inner Self into proper balance and by cultivating a conscious, connected way of being in the world.
          *
          Much more could be said, but the important part is that it is not gender I am getting at here. And I’m certainly not touting “feminism” or proposing a “right person for the job.” My feeling about that is that the “right person for the job” (if you’re indicating the US presidency) will not be on the ticket for either of the major parties. To my mind, those slots are bought and paid for by interests that do not include the well-being of the planet. There is no outside Candidate or Superman who is going to come and rescue us from ourselves. We need to do the inner work as individuals, but do it collectively.
          *
          If the inner work is done, we will again be in proper relationship not only to our Selves, and to one another, but to the Earth that gave us life. Peace will be a natural extension of that relationship. Jane Goodall is a beautiful example of someone who is in proper relation to herself, to those with whom she shares this planet, and to the Earth itself. Greta is on her way. Each is self-possessed, driven by compassion and has a presence which extends energetically outward to encompass others. I’ve encountered one other individual in my life who had a similar all-encompassing compassion, and it was the Dalai Llama (whom I went to see speak in Hawaii when I was living there). It is that kind of presence I believe we each need to cultivate.
          *
          I hope that makes sense and answers your concerns.
          *
          ~Autumn

          1. i feel better now….knowing gender doesn’t matter to you…autumn.
            but curious if you plan to vote…after what you believe about party, etc.
            i do agree that doing my part matters….but wouldn’t it help some if the next to occupy the wh at least believed in science fact/climate change, etc.?
            i know i could breathe easier if chemical pollutants were gone!

          2. I agree with all of this–but the apes are still endangered, and Greta has stirred people up to strike, but hasn’t gotten any substantive results on emission draw-down from world leaders. New drilling is going forward all over the world and carbon is higher than ever–and projected to keep rising.
            Something just isn’t working. Where I am, I haven’t even been able to get one bookstore to stop handing out plastic bags–though a majority of the staff is deeply pained by having to keep giving them out. The Xmas rush is in full swing, with all the usual excess, waste, and unsustainable ways. I don’t see anything changing. The hopeful notes are few and small and far between and I’m having trouble not collapsing in pessimism. I want to think haiku is helping, but not sure even of that.

          3. Dear Autumn (and Wendy), I have recently been asking women to consider whether they really feel they are going to get a fair hearing under the current structures, and if not, to consider whether a women-focused political party might be one potential solution. It’s easy for me to ask the question (and I may very well vote for the answer) but others need to “own” it and think it through. Good luck.

      2. Thank you Autumn! I believe that the feminine will save us all if she only finally has a voice. Meanwhile, we must accept the unity of s/he.

        1. peggy:
          .
          can you explain to me about this “voice” and how is it being prevented?
          .
          also what do you mean by the “unity of s/he”

    2. Garry Eaton this indeed is a serious problem….and might be the very death to us all!
      Thanks to this kind of sharing…may we continue to grab the ears, hearts, and minds of all,
      wake the sleepers….and inspire all to do their best to be kind, and considerate of our world and the people that rely on it.

      thank you for yours,
      wendy

  7. eyes to read
    breath to write
    an earth to flourish
    .
    wendy c. bialek
    .
    Some basic wants are expressed in this poem on both the individual level and on the global level.

    1. yes, valentina, thank you for pointing this out.
      *
      ( i would also think of them as blessed gifts and human rights that are in constant jeopardy.)

  8. in a decade
    not decayed
    trampoline
    .
    Ronald K. Craig
    .
    We all want to be bouncing high during the next ten years especially the senior crowd.

  9. Lori, thank you for this collection.

    Two selections that especially touched me –

    birthday candles
    another wish to fade
    her pain

    Rich Schilling

    How many of us have wanted to “wish away the pain” of a loved one. Simple and poignant.

    …………………..

    grave site selected
    who will receive the medals
    great-grandfather earned

    Pris Campbell

    Like Pris, I look at heirlooms and wonder which – if any – family member might cherish them. Will the story behind them survive?

  10. Another marvellous collection, Lori, congratulations to all poets.
    .
    moon viewing
    and other important things
    retirement
    .
    Rehu Kovavic
    .
    Love the simplicity of this verse, it conveys, for me, that it is more often than not, the little everyday things that cost nothing or very little that give the most pleasure in life. Lovely verse, Rehu.
    .
    next ten years
    becoming a mother
    to my mother
    .
    Richa Sharma
    .
    I think this verse can relate to so many people, in the past, present and future.
    I’ve been there, so this verse resonates. Bitter sweet, a wonderful verse Richa.
    .
    final party plans complete
    .
    Margaret Walker
    .
    Oow! Margaret this can be read in different ways, this sprung to my mind, final plans for retirement or a funeral?
    Nice one 🙂

    1. Carol –

      Thank you for your comment to my “final party”. I hoped it could be interpreted in several ways.

      Margaret Walker

  11. forget what
    the future holds
    snowflakes

    Olivier Schopfer, Switzerland

    I took this to mean, probably incorrectly, that what one hopes and wishes for in the future is as ephemeral and unattainable as capturing a snowflake.
    There is also another meaning to ‘snowflake’ (urban dictionary). From a psychological/philosophical point of view, taken a step or two beyond, I appreciated all three possible interpretations.

    1. I also got something about global warming from this (a fourth interpretation?), something like who knows what the future holds but whatever it is it ain’t gonna be snowflakes.

  12. Hopeful, poignant, uplifting, and sad…lots of different haiku for the decade to come.

    I loved Autumn Noelle’s haiku about finally getting paid to write…It so fits me (and others, I imagine).

    Mine refers back to my previous haiku last week.

    1. Thank you for commenting on my senryu, Nancy. And many thanks to Lori as well for including it here!
      *
      Sadly, it’s probably all-too-universal! I’m sure it’s not lost on anyone that my intention is tongue-in-cheek, as pay-for-poetry will likely be as much a pipe dream in the future as it is at present. I mainly found it entertaining to consider that when I’m finally old enough to collect Social Security, I will be able to continue staying home to write while actually receiving enough of a stipend to eat, too!
      *
      Imagine that… ; )
      *
      Autumn

  13. Thank you Lori for your comments and selections. We all engage with future gazing in different ways…this was a worthwhile pause to ponder, write and read about. Mark Meyer’s haiku clicked for me probably as it seems to echo my own thoughts about personal and global decade(s) to come:
    .
    the endgame —
    leaving a dying planet
    for another world
    .
    Mark Meyer

    1. Ditto
      With the utter failure that was COP25, I took a look at this profoundly moving work of art, the film Human’s Voice by Yann Arthus-Bertrand, which I believe every decision maker should be asked to watch. Stunning photography, beautiful music and vocals.
      If you have more than a moment to spare, do please take a look at :
      youtube.com/watch?v=uog4eCZTUX4

      1. Thank you, Ingrid, for this mention of a fairly recent film in the Human series. I hope to take a look at it in the near future.

    2. Thank you, Janice. Perhaps my contribution was a bit on the “dark” side for some, but there is always hope for the survival of this world & its flora & fauna.

      1. You are most welcome Mark. I find hope in knowing or acknowledging both the “dark” and the “light”… I still have hope for this planet, but sadly for some species extinction has occurred or is in progress.

      2. No, not dark, Mark, just possibly a very sad truth, and one that makes me shudder.
        .
        Above, Wendy C. Bialek says the words—
        how do we become examples of the behaviour we want without repeating behaviour we don’t want.
        .
        Now there’s sentence to ponder on. And brought back an interview I listened to on R4
        A discussion on the search for a habitable plant,
        The interviewer asked ‘Would we respect any habitable planet investigate it with the lightest of ‘footprint’
        The reply ‘In the first instance, yes, but that would all depend on what would be found’
        .
        Well, there we have it, Wendy, doesn’t look as if we’ll be saving this planet or any other any time soon or changing our ways.
        .
        A handful of people talking about ‘saving the planet’ – and its not he planet we are saving, there’s nothing wrong with the planet, it has witnessed many catastrophic events, the likes we can only imaging, and will never see- it is ourselves, so it is ‘us’ as a whole. But I doubt that will ever happen.
        It didn’t happen over forty years ago, when the first alarm bell were rung, we’re still developing carriageways and clearing areas for more and more houses, WE are the problem, so maybe a reduction in that direction should be our first plan of attack.

    3. Janice I very much appreciated your
      .
      final decade(s)
      downsizing to zero
      emissions
      .
      Like Garry I do wonder what the future holds and what future generations will think about our tiny verses from the early decades of this century ….

  14. first step on Mars
    my bucket list
    grows longer

    John Green

    This one by John made me smile.
    If only John, I’d have seat number 2.

  15. perhaps
    they’ll return at my window
    the sparrows gran loved

    ( sparrows have become extinct in north India due to mindless urbanisation and lack of emotional connect )

    arvinder Kaur
    Chandigarh, India
    **
    Very touched by this one. Over the years the flocks of sparrows that used to congregate all around me–and even nest, brood, and fledge on my window ledge–have dwindled to smaller and smaller groups, What used to be such a cheery chattery time is now too quiet and still–except when the silence is blasted away by leaf blowers and other anti-nature artillery.
    Arvidner, I hope the birds come back to you! So hard to live in this world sometimes.

    1. Thanks Laurie! I am so glad this resonated with you so well . We all do live in a world of shared experiences wherever we might be. Much love to you.

    2. Hi, Laurie,
      *
      Love the genius phrase (hidden monoku?) you’ve tucked into your paragraph:
      *
      leaf blowers and other anti-nature artillery
      *
      Boy, can I relate. The person who owns the VRBO–vacational rental by owner–cottage next to our cabin actually had a guy leaf-blowing the snow off the ROOF last weekend. In the mountains, no less. And here I thought snowy rooftops was part of the aesthetic charm… It’s interesting to me that it is rarely we year-round residents making mechanical racket. Whenever the temporary summer residents start pouring in, the “anti-nature artillery” ratchets up. I’m always tempted to walk around and introduce my part-time neighbors to a wondrous near-silent invention: the broom.
      *
      I also really appreciated your haiku:
      *
      pollinator garden
      a future on the scale
      of a butterfly’s wings
      *
      Laurie Greer
      Washington DC
      *
      I like the way it focuses us on a simple, do-able difference we can make as individuals by planting pollinator-friendly gardens. I also like the potential reference to the “butterfly effect” of a small action having a large impact down the road (which could be looked at in both its positive and negative environmental sense here). Finally, your use of the word “scale” is very astute, as butterfly wings are covered in tiny feather-like scales; that meaning doubles with the measurement meaning of “scale” to expand the overall meaning of the poem.
      *
      Thank you for contributing such a thoughtful haiku!
      *
      ~Autumn

      1. Autumn–
        Thanks for your close reading! I did try to pack in all the things you so nicely unpacked. And I really do intend to start a pollinator garden; not sure I know what I’m doing, but for the insects’ sake–have to try.

  16. Hi Lori and Kathy,

    For some reason even though I submitted my haiku in plenty of time last week it does not appear here? This happened two weeks ago also. Must have been a glitch. I will post it here what I had submitted for Turn of the Decade – Next Ten Years:

    Monday morning
    uninterrupted dreams
    the silent dawn

    – Sari Grandstaff, Saugerties, NY

      1. we have moved away from ‘Poet’s Choice’ to a selection by the guest editor for now…
        thanks for your understanding, kj

        1. Oh, yes, I understand now. I did not realize this change. When two weeks ago my haiku did not appear then last week it was there and then this week it did not appear again I thought cyberthings were going awry. Got it now and thank you again!

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