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Sex

Started by John McManus, June 02, 2011, 09:57:08 PM

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John McManus

Well, now I have your attention here is my questions.

Does sex matter when it comes to reading haiku? By sex I am reffering to gender, if you saw a annonymous haiku, would you be able to tell if it is written by a man or a woman?

When you read a haiku and then see the name beneath does knowing the author's gender create more resonance or help you connect better with the poem?

I know alot of people will know this haiku, but I feel that if I hadn't seen the name of the author and be able to assign gender. I would still think it was a woman who had written it.

day moon
the dish rag
wearing thin

Lorin Ford

How about this one, again people might already be aware of it, due to the high profile of the author but for me knowing the author is a woman adds a resonance to this.

strawberry moon
all night something huge
romps in the attic

Carolyn Hall   


I look forward to hearing all your thougths.

warm regards,
John
     

AlanSummers

Hi John,

You asked:
Does sex matter when it comes to reading haiku? By sex I am reffering to gender, if you saw a anonymous haiku, would you be able to tell if it is written by a man or a woman?

I wouldn't care as a reader, only later as a collator or analyst.  I probably would guess a number correctly, unless someone deliberately wrote as if another gender.

I see you have narrowed down the genders to just two, can I ask why? 

You asked:
When you read a haiku and then see the name beneath does knowing the author's gender create more resonance or help you connect better with the poem?

I personally don't care much about the fourth line (author's identity).  Once I've read a haiku as a reader, it's possible as a collator or analyst, or if writing a piece, I might.  It's the strength of the piece that I'm interested in.

Although I'm contradictorily very excited about the women's anthology that Aubrie Cox is producing, partly as a reader for pleasure, and also as an analyst, and for the With Words workshops and courses library.

As these are well known, could you locate some that might not be as well known?  I realise it might take time asking for permissions.

It would be intriguing, and a useful exercise in its own right.

Alan

Quote from: John McManus on June 02, 2011, 09:57:08 PM
Well, now I have your attention here is my questions.

Does sex matter when it comes to reading haiku? By sex I am reffering to gender, if you saw a annonymous haiku, would you be able to tell if it is written by a man or a woman?

When you read a haiku and then see the name beneath does knowing the author's gender create more resonance or help you connect better with the poem?

I know alot of people will know this haiku, but I feel that if I hadn't seen the name of the author and be able to assign gender. I would still think it was a woman who had written it.

day moon
the dish rag
wearing thin

Lorin Ford

How about this one, again people might already be aware of it, due to the high profile of the author but for me knowing the author is a woman adds a resonance to this.

strawberry moon
all night something huge
romps in the attic

Carolyn Hall   


I look forward to hearing all your thougths.

warm regards,
John
     

John McManus

Hi Alan, thanks for coming in on this.

I narrowed it down to the two genders, because as far as I'm aware there isn't a literary tradition of hermaphrodites, whereas there is defiante literary traditions attributed to the male and female genders.

I think your point of bringing in less well known poets is an excellent one and implore others to contribute poems they feel to be particularly masculine or feminine (please make sure you have permissions if the poems are not readily available via a google search!)

warm regards,
John

   

AlanSummers

Well, I know of a few transexual haiku writers, and I bet there are a number of hermaphrodite writers too, but I wouldn't dream of asking.

I know most of the transexual writers, and would love to be involved in a LGBT haiku anthology as it's a very important subject.

Look forward to seeing more haiku, with initially no names, and obviously a note to say permission is granted. ;-)

Alan

John McManus

I understand what your saying Alan, but would transexuals still not would write in either a masculine or feminine voice depending on which way they are orientated.

I too look forward to seeing some more haiku that can expand our discussions.

A LGBT haiku anthology would be something else, is this an ongoing project Alan?

warm regards,
John

AlanSummers

I have thousands of projects I would dearly love to do if I had the time and the money. 

I was privilged to be on the Spoken Word Panel for the first Bristol Ladyfest event, and wow, did we all put on a great show.

Alan

Mariu Moreno

A friend of mine who is a photographer told me that a certain well known woman photographer used to make clear on every picture that there was a woman behind the camera. I dont know her name or her work, but I think it is at least interesting to guess whether a man or a woman is behind a poem. Maybe the clue is in the angle, what do you think?
All my best from a Argentina

Mariu
(a SHE) hahaha

Alison Williams

There are sites you can go to on the internet that will tell you, from a sample of your writing, whether you are male or female. There are differences in the way that men and women use language and the language that they use. Statistically significant differences. However, when you come down to the individual, rather than statistical samples, things are more complicated. I'm often identified by these sites as male!  ::)

I've not tried putting haiku in there.... yet!

One way of finding new inspiration, might be to invite your anima or animus (as appropriate) to take part.  ;)

Alison


Jack Galmitz

An excellent point, Alison.
I just had a series of haiku related to the anima published in Ginyu 51.
It's good to strive for wholeness in our being not just imitate socially promoted sex roles.
Frankly, poetry has always been considered a somewhat dubious practice in America because of its sexual neutrality, if you will. All you need do is look at American movies and you'll see the lopsided sense of manhood they represent, much more so than in Europe.

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