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Jane Reichhold - an iconic haiku

Started by AlanSummers, September 04, 2016, 08:59:24 AM

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AlanSummers

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Two poets discuss this iconic haiku:


moving into the sun
the pony takes with him
some mountain shadow


Jane Reichhold
American Haiku in Four Seasons
Yilin Press, Nanjing, China (1991)


http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/2016/09/02/revirals-51/

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Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Jan Benson

Alan:

Read your explication at THF yesterday. Quite the moving detail, the way you see it.

Gives me a "fresh mindset" regarding Jane's approach to haiku.

Had seen her interview online, the long one, and wondered about all of the 14? Rules she had developed as tests of a good KU. Though in the interview, she did spare the listener those details.

Jan Benson
---1st Prize_The Italian Matsuo Basho Award 2016 (Int'l Foreign Language)
---A Pushcart Nominated Poet, (haiku "adobe walls").
---"The poet is accessible, the poet is for everyone." Maya Angelou

AlanSummers

Jan,

Yes, we all have our shadows, and it can look, from a certain eye, that anyone or other animal, moving away from the great shadow of a mountain, is taking a way a bit of it. :)

Do you mean HAIKU RULES THAT HAVE COME AND GONE Take Your Pick by Jane Reichhold?   If so, that is to show how many contradictory viewpoints there were, and all forcibly put forward as rules, rather than approaches.  Like other skills we need to learn everything and forget much (of it), not most, or some, just shed, but know and recognise contradictions, mistakes, good approaches, and not be levered into a formulaic stranglehold.

"Haiku poets, as all poets, should feel free to use the haiku in whatever way seems appropriate to their creativity. There never were any rules, just fashions and preferences. To be somewhere and write about it; that is what haiku is. You may write one hundred in a night or one in a lifetime.  The history of haiku and its poets, as with many things, is endlessly fascinating but is no substitute for the creative response to the moment."

Edith Shiffert,  age 88,    (from,  Yama-Biko:  Mountain Echo)
Published 9/15/03.



Quote from: Jan in Texas on September 04, 2016, 08:44:27 PM
Alan:

Read your explication at THF yesterday. Quite the moving detail, the way you see it.

Gives me a "fresh mindset" regarding Jane's approach to haiku.

Had seen her interview online, the long one, and wondered about all of the 14? Rules she had developed as tests of a good KU. Though in the interview, she did spare the listener those details.

Jan Benson
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Jan Benson

#3
Alan,
You are preaching to the choir here, so I guess your explanation is for some unknown entity that may trip on over here for a read.

If I can locate the interview/presentation again I will gladly post it here.

Jane gave a presentation, in her advanced age, and afterward opened to Q and A with the audience.
In response to a Q from one audience member, she asked if her haiku rules helped him in his writing of haiku.

Also, during the video, she clearly states she has developed 14 "tests" to apply to her own haiku, and her poems have to pass those tests to be sent off for publishing.

However, your remarks above are well taken here, as I emerged from the American path of rules oriented haiku writing, and you know well of what I am speaking.
Thanks bees for the progressives who are dismantling those traps.

Jan

------------EDIT - Two Hours Later-----------
I am unable to locate the long presentation by Jane, at this time, and I did not save it to my files. I did find one other video of her at the time of my search. I like to hear the poet when I'm being introduced to someone unknown to me, and am glad she has such options available, in her legacy.

To restate, your explication did bring me closer to her work.
I am in no hurry to read her, but if I do stumble upon her works, I will now likely pay closer attention.

Jan
---1st Prize_The Italian Matsuo Basho Award 2016 (Int'l Foreign Language)
---A Pushcart Nominated Poet, (haiku "adobe walls").
---"The poet is accessible, the poet is for everyone." Maya Angelou

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