News:

If you click the "Log In" button and get an error, use this URL to display the forum home page: https://thehaikufoundation.org/forum_sm/

Update any bookmarks you have for the forum to use this URL--not a similar URL that includes "www."
___________
Welcome to The Haiku Foundation forum! Some features and boards are available only to registered members who are logged in. To register, click Register in the main menu below. Click Login to login. Please use a Report to Moderator link to report any problems with a board or a topic.

Main Menu

New in 2013 from Rosenberry Books

Started by elliotnicely, February 09, 2013, 04:13:37 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

elliotnicely

Rosenberry Books is excited to announce this year's latest release entitled Tangled Shadows by Elliot Nicely. Nicely's debut collection of senryu and haiku will prove to be a wonderful addition to any haijin's library. For a preview or ordering information, please click on the link below:

http://rosenberrybooks.com/hand-bound-editions/haiku/tangled-shadows/

AlanSummers

The book, and publishers, look fantastic.  Definitely on my wishlist.

Alan

Quote from: elliotnicely on February 09, 2013, 04:13:37 PM
Rosenberry Books is excited to announce this year's latest release entitled Tangled Shadows by Elliot Nicely. Nicely's debut collection of senryu and haiku will prove to be a wonderful addition to any haijin's library. For a preview or ordering information, please click on the link below:

http://rosenberrybooks.com/hand-bound-editions/haiku/tangled-shadows/
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Diane of RosenberryBooks

Alan, thank you for the praise for Elliot's love-story of a book -- and for the creative publishing we do at Rosenberry Books!

When Haiku Foundation folks come for a visit to see Tangled Shadows and other haiku titles, you might also like to take a look at a new series of articles on our blog, titled "Typography Tips for Poets" (particularly for haijin).

So much attention to subtle detail goes into the creation of haiku and other short forms. The articles are meant to help poets (and publishers) see that awareness is maintained via the typographical presentation of the poems.

http://rosenberrybooks.com/typography-tips-for-poets-pt-1/

AlanSummers

Thanks Diane.


On the blog entry you refer to, it said:
"Here is another story. Somewhere I saw an anthology of haiku. The editors had the problem of identifying the author of each haiku. They chose to follow each poem closely with the author's name, and in order to separate the name from the body of the poem, the author's name was in bold. Typographically speaking, this amounted to shouting the author's name. It emphasized the name. The name became more important than the poem.

To me, this design said that the editors encouraged readers to skim for the names of authors they knew. And for me, with the poet's name shouting beneath each poem, I had a difficult time reading each haiku in peace. I know, I know, I'm just too sensitive. (But I know you are sensitive too, or you wouldn't be writing all those marvelously tiny poems!)"


You are singing what I've been saying for a long time, that the poetry should come first.   As a haiku is so brief, having the name hanging over it feels like an adult shouting at a child.

Thankfully I found like-minded editors, and the new/gendai haiku magazine I'm involved with, called Bones Journal,  simply has the names at the back of the eMagazine.  We took some flack over that, but we also got a lot of praise.   The magazine was seen to put the poetry first, for the poetry to stand on its own two feet, and for the reader free to read the poetry for itself. 

Some readers are relatively new to haiku, and whatever type of poem it is, it's not a pre-requisite for them to have the label or brand all over the poem.   If the poem speaks for itself, and the reader is interested in knowing more, an index proves to be a useful resource.

Your books are like exquisite gifts for a reader of poetry.

Alan


Quote from: Diane of RosenberryBooks on February 10, 2013, 10:39:02 PM
Alan, thank you for the praise for Elliot's love-story of a book -- and for the creative publishing we do at Rosenberry Books!

When Haiku Foundation folks come for a visit to see Tangled Shadows and other haiku titles, you might also like to take a look at a new series of articles on our blog, titled "Typography Tips for Poets" (particularly for haijin).

So much attention to subtle detail goes into the creation of haiku and other short forms. The articles are meant to help poets (and publishers) see that awareness is maintained via the typographical presentation of the poems.

http://rosenberrybooks.com/typography-tips-for-poets-pt-1/
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Diane of RosenberryBooks

Alan, thank you for visiting our blog, and for your reflections on the first posting of "Typography Tips for Poets" !

We've just posted a continuation: "Part 2 Large Repercussions of the Small."
http://rosenberrybooks.com/part-2-large-repercussions-of-the-small/

I'm so glad to hear of your agreement ... and the results in Bones Journal. E-books have certain challenges, with less ability to shape how the reader sees the page. I see why you put the authors in the back for safe-keeping.

In a printed and bound book there are other options. For instance, The shape of the curving page offers a nice place to add info, like an authors name -- towards the gutter. As the page curves inward the text is there at hand, but less apparent.

Every different setting calls for different priorities and solutions. A lovely challenge!

Just about everyone is typing these days, every day, as fast as possible. Anyone can print, anyone can make a book. Isn't that amazing!

But I've seen some mighty fine writing essentially trashed by lack of typographical awareness. It's like taking a beauty like Gregory Peck (he used to do something like this, by-the-way, in order to walk about), and dressing him in a soup-slopped sweater and a slouch hat with fishing hooks. You might tend to look away....

AlanSummers

It is so gratifying to read what you say here, and at the webpage you have quoted.

I have seen so many haiku books, collections and anthologies, ruined by some often basic oversight.

I'm very very pleased with my own collection of gendai haiku (Does Fish-God Know) but feel drawn towards publishing my traditional haiku myself.

Your books are definitely on my wishlist, and once my budget is clear, I'll come calling for a book or two.

Wonderful wonderful website!

Alan

p.s.

I've watched that Gregory Peck.  He didn't look bad, even with that awful outfit. :-)

Quote from: Diane of RosenberryBooks on February 11, 2013, 02:21:55 PM
Alan, thank you for visiting our blog, and for your reflections on the first posting of "Typography Tips for Poets" !

We've just posted a continuation: "Part 2 Large Repercussions of the Small."
http://rosenberrybooks.com/part-2-large-repercussions-of-the-small/

I'm so glad to hear of your agreement ... and the results in Bones Journal. E-books have certain challenges, with less ability to shape how the reader sees the page. I see why you put the authors in the back for safe-keeping.

In a printed and bound book there are other options. For instance, The shape of the curving page offers a nice place to add info, like an authors name -- towards the gutter. As the page curves inward the text is there at hand, but less apparent.

Every different setting calls for different priorities and solutions. A lovely challenge!

Just about everyone is typing these days, every day, as fast as possible. Anyone can print, anyone can make a book. Isn't that amazing!

But I've seen some mighty fine writing essentially trashed by lack of typographical awareness. It's like taking a beauty like Gregory Peck (he used to do something like this, by-the-way, in order to walk about), and dressing him in a soup-slopped sweater and a slouch hat with fishing hooks. You might tend to look away....
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Diane of RosenberryBooks

I don't see any postings for haiga, so I'll just add to this posting of new books.

Is there interest in haiga out there? If so of primary interest is this new book ---Last Bite --- haiku by Robert Moyer, art by Guntram Porps & Mona Wu

The artists work, and the book's design itself, really "get" haiga's potential to reach beyond the haiku. Great vitality here! Mona Wu does gorgeous, traditional work while Guntram Porps' work is swift, sensitive and widely eclectic.

http://rosenberrybooks.com/hand-bound-editions/haiku/last-bite/

A different approach to reaching beyond the haiku through haiga is demonstrated in Patricia Nolan's Western Brushstrokes. She selects a calligraphic Japanese word written with brushstokes in renman, an extreme form of cursive, that angle towards the haiku in unique ways -- both visually and in meaning.

http://rosenberrybooks.com/hand-bound-editions/haiku/western-brushstrokes/

I know these are our books .... but I personally really prefer haiga that travels beyond illustration. (Even if Basho sometimes did just illustrate his own haiku) .... Do others feel this way??

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk