Author Topic: Spanish-language haiku  (Read 22668 times)

Mary Stevens

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Spanish-language haiku
« on: December 22, 2010, 07:30:38 PM »
Can anyone recommend print or online journals of haiku (and/or tanka, haiga, haibun, linked forms, etc.) that are of the same quality and follow the same poetic conventions as such publications as, for example, Frogpond, Modern Haiku, Heron's Nest, Acorn, Dim Sum, etc.?

Can someone tell me of an association or society in the Spanish-speaking world as dedicated to communicating the conventions of quality Spanish-language haiku as the Haiku Society of America is for English-language haiku?
"A word that breathes distinctly
Has not the power to die..."

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AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2011, 05:32:46 AM »
I'm not aware of a Spanish Haiku Society alas, but hopefully someone else will point us to them.

I have found some links, [see below] but in the meantime I'm intrigued by this statement, and please don't be annoyed with me, I'm just sincerely puzzled:
Can someone tell me of an association or society in the Spanish-speaking world as dedicated to communicating the conventions of quality Spanish-language haiku as the Haiku Society of America is for English-language haiku?

As a foundation member of the Australian Haiku Society, and a former General Secretary of the British Haiku Society, I would hasten to say, that although we are not as old as the HSA, we are as dedicated.  I've also been behind the scenes of the Irish Haiku Society who are doing so much using English as the main language.

Also Presence (physically based in the U.K. but international in character) is a great magazine: http://haiku-presence.50webs.com/links.html bursting to the seams with subscribers and other people submitting works of quality from around the world, although all the haiku are in English. ;-)

Under my other hat of With Words, last year I probably interacted on a physical level with over five thousand people who had never come across haiku or knew little of it.

Your first statement also intrigued me:
Can anyone recommend print or online journals of haiku (and/or tanka, haiga, haibun, linked forms, etc.) that are of the same quality and follow the same poetic conventions as such publications as, for example, Frogpond, Modern Haiku, Heron's Nest, Acorn, Dim Sum, etc.?

I don't know if Spanish haiku, or any non-English language journal or magazine can be the duplicate of these North American publications.  Spanish is one of the largest languages in the world, and has its own distinct character, and is  spoken not only in Spain (Europe), but places in the Americas (usually the southern parts) so they are unlikely to be North American in character, style or subject. 

I also wouldn't expect Spanish haiku from European Spain to be British in character, or like any other European or American landmass haiku.

It's the same shock, I expect, when most of us when new to haiku, and only aware of Victorianesque translations of classic Japanese haiku, then at some point come across modern, and contemporary, Japanese haiku.  I'm still surprised at one of Tohta Kaneko's popular and important gendai haiku which mentions the C word. ;-)


La playa sola
mecidas por las olas
las caracolas...

Malena Imas, Uruguay


Viento de Verano
Junto pètalos de rosa
y los dejo ir

Carlos Fleitas, Uruguay


arbol marchito
brillan gotas de lluvia
bajo la luna

Mahrya Fulfer, Milikin University (article writer)

I don't mean to sound harsh, so apologies for that, it's just I wasn't sure what answer you wanted.  I located someone from South America so it's not European Spanish:

This focuses on Carlos Fleitas, from the Americas (Uruguay):
http://www.terebess.hu/english/haiku/carlosfleitas.html

And from the American university course run by our very own Randy Brooks! ;-)

Millikin University Haiku Writer Profile: Carlos Fleitas
http://old.millikin.edu/haiku//writerprofiles/CarlosFleitas.html

Mahrya Fulfer on The Musical Haiku of Carlos Fleitas:
http://old.millikin.edu/haiku//writerprofiles/FulferOnFleitas.html

Carlos has been published in The Heron's Nest as well. ;-)

I don't know if his email is still working, but you can find it at this site:
http://usuarios.netgate.com.uy/carlosfleitas/indexen.htm

Alan

cat

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2011, 06:15:46 AM »
Hello, Mary,

I don't know the answers to your questions, but I do know someone I can ask.

I assume what you're asking in your first paragraph is whether or not there are Spanish-language journals that follow the conventions of contemporary English-language haiku in the sense of not being 17 syllables and 5-7-5?  Or have I misunderstood?

I will see what I can find out.

cat
"Nature inspires me. I am only a messenger."  ~Kitaro

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2011, 09:14:45 AM »
Dear Mary,

Apologies if my post seemed harsh.  I hope you get some good contact details about Spanish writers currently writing haiku.

I'm just passionate about writers from countries other than the USA & Canada, and Britain getting their own style independent of the influence from the aforementioned countries.

all my best, and please do let us know what you discover. ;-)

Alan

Lorin

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2011, 12:48:53 PM »
Hi Mary,
           Whilst I don't personally know the answer to your question about Spanish-language haiku, I'll lay odds on that Charles Trumball, editor of Modern Haiku does.  :) There is quite a community of Spanish-language  haiku writers in Brazil, for example, and part III of his essay, One Hundred Bridges, One Hundred Traditions in Haiku is 'The Haiku Bridge to Brazil'. It's published in the current issue of Modern Haiku.

Why not write to Charles and ask him about Spanish-language associations or societies?

You might also write to Anatoly Kudryavitsky, the editor of Shamrock Haiku Journal, as he has contact with many European groups and haiku writers. English versions of Spanish haiku are featured in Issue #13, as well as a short essay about haiku in Spain by Susan Benet in which she mentions "Asociación Valenciana de Haiku" and the “Asociación de la Gente del Haiku en Albacete” (AGHA).

http://shamrockhaiku.webs.com/shamrockno13.htm

To your first question, it isn't clear to me that you're asking about Spanish-language journals, though in context of your second, you might be. You mention Frogpond, Modern Haiku, Heron's Nest, Acorn, Dim Sum, which are all quality journals indeed, and all USA journals with editors who are USA citizens.

The British print journal I'd recommend is Presence (editor, Martin Lucas)

http://haiku-presence.50webs.com/

The international English-language on-line journal I'd recommend is Notes From the Gean (haiku editor, Lorin Ford)

http://www.geantree.com/indexcover.html

Read through the current issue and the archived issues and judge for yourself. The 8th issue will go online on March 1st (it has never been late, over the course of 7 issues to date) and submissions are open currently and until the deadline of March 30th for the June issue.

cheers,
-Lorin
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 01:12:53 PM by Lorin »

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2011, 08:11:45 PM »
Hi Lorin
I'm glad you duplicated my recommendation of Presence as it is a superb magazine and worth subscribing to it, although as I say in my post it's a battle to get work in there as there are so many quality writers sending in work. :-)

Great info Lorin on Spanish groups and I hope Charles Trumbull and Anatoly can help you Mary, good luck! :-)

Alan

Lorin

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2011, 08:36:18 PM »
Sorry to have duplicated your reference to Presence, Alan. To be quite honest, I didn't get beyond reading your "As a foundation member of the Australian Haiku Society...etc. etc."

I know that you were, of course, and I also know precisely how the AHS/HaikuOz came about as John Bird's second step after the First Australian Haiku Anthology (which I succeeded in getting a link to up on HaikuOz, where it should always have been, in an accessible place last year) You'll find it, if you haven't already, under 'Haiku- History in Australia'.

- Lorin
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 08:46:59 PM by Lorin »

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2011, 04:45:51 AM »
I have noticed there are quite a few repeats in posts: sometimes it's a good idea. :-)

Re haiku oz
yep knew that and yes great to see it there, thanks.
A bit of history and ahead of its time back then. John Bird accomplished a heck of a lot with the amazing Janice Bostok. :-)

Alan

Lorin

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2011, 05:43:45 AM »
Hi Alan,

John Bird did such a lot, pulling in everyone he could find who was writing haiku at the time. Of course he was smart enough to ask Jan Bostok to co-edit the 'First Australian Haiku Anthology'. His great hope was to inspire " a sense of collegiate" among Australian haiku writers. He also realised that Australian haiku needed an internet presence before anyone else did.

(Of course, I wasn't around at the time. I only began with haiku very late in 2004, and was first published, as far as haiku goes, in 2005)

I'm a dreamer, like John. My hope is to follow in his footsteps, in whatever small ways I can.

- Lorin

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2011, 06:08:59 AM »
I was lucky enough to be invited into the then Brisbane based Paper Wasp haiku group, along with Jan, that was inspired by the great Jack Stamm's during the expo.

Jan and myself discussed an Aussie haiku society a long time ago but it the exceptional John Bird to make it come true for a number of us.

I would love to hear the history of the Spanish haiku groups now. :-)

Alan

Lorin

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2011, 06:46:59 AM »
Hi again Alan,

yep, I know the background to the paper wasp group via Jacqui Murray and John Knight (who published my haiku book, after all, and I sincerely respect him for it, under the circumstances) It was not only Jack Stamm (who later funded the subsequent paper wasp Jack Stamm awards) but also Professor Sato and Kaneko Tohta (then president of Japan’s Modern Haiku Association) who influenced the formation of the paper wasp group and thus the revival of haiku in Australia. I think that you, and Jan also, were invited into the paper wasp group a little later?

- Lorin

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2011, 08:07:21 AM »
Yes, invited later, as it was a purely local Brisbane haiku group at first (with international help as you mentio).  I wasn't in Australia until a little later.  It was Australia that kickstarted my interest in haiku after finding copies of Bill's Haiku Handbook in a local Ipswich branch library (along with Salad Anniversary [haiku attempts perversely]) and Ross Clark bringing out his first book of haiku "Local Seasonings".

I think Paper Wasp were slowly expanding, becoming national, and a few years later became international.  I had barely begun to write haiku when I was invited, and obviously doing well in the first FAWQ haiku competition helped to show I was serious, plus reading haiku at the Brisbane Wordfest organised primarily by the amazing Brett Dionysus  (pre Graham Nunn) plus my haiku being accepted for Haiku World, and being published in HI (Tokyo) etc... etc...

Now, then, I'm eager to hear about the various Spanish haiku groups and organisations both in Europe and the Americas! ;-)

Alan

Mary Stevens

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2011, 02:34:21 PM »
Hi, Lorin. Shamrock Haiku had exactly what I was looking for: haiku (of the kind I like) in Spanish, and names of Spanish-language anthologies, associations, and online workshops. Plenty to explore, here: thank you!

I had read Charles Trumbull's essay in MH (Part I, in which he focuses on the haiku of Hispanic America), but did not find what I was seeking. I just received the latest issue, and look forward to reading the third installment you mention.

Your Gean Tree looks lovely, and when I run my course with the Spanish, I'll come back around to it, as well as Presence, which you and Alan had recommended.

Thanks to Alan, too: In her paper about Carlos Fleitas, Mahrya Fulfer mentioned some publications in which Fleitas has published haiku, and a couple of them are what I was looking for:
http://www.elrincondelhaiku.org/index_cont.php

http://haiku.bitacoras.com/categorias/haiku

Someone else had directed me to a few sites, the following of which appealed to me at first glance and which I plan to take a closer look at:
http://www.no-michi.com/

http://haiku.cc.ehime-u.ac.jp/shiki.archive/9701/0619.html

http://zolsaihan-haiku.blogspot.com/

http://eosbarbarin.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2010-01-01T00%3A00%3A00%2B01%3A00&updated-max=2011-01-01T00%3A00%3A00%2B01%3A00&max-results=24

cat, thanks for your offer to ask around! Yes, you were correct in your interpretation of my question about the "conventions" of haiku: I was referring to flexibility around syllable count, to account for the structural differences among the Japanese, English, and Spanish languages. I was also referring to what Jean Gireaux, Harold G. Henderson, Lee Gurga, and others have explained so well. What I love to see in haiku are a basis in nature, spareness, a resonance between two images, natural diction, sabi, and wabi—and the absence of explicitly stating emotion, intellectualization/philosophizing/moral commentary, anthropomorphizing, aphorisms/epigrams/telegrams/bumper stickers/headlines, and mere statements of fact. The few haiku in Spanish I had seen before Lorin's and Alan's leads were very much like the traditional poetry of Spain, which feel too "heavy" for haiku.

Gracias,

Mary




"A word that breathes distinctly
Has not the power to die..."

            —Emily Dickinson

AlanSummers

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2011, 05:04:12 PM »
Thanks for the terrific report back Mary.  I feel the topic you raised has become a useful resource for others seeking quality Spanish haiku.

I love your list:
What I love to see in haiku are a basis in nature, spareness, a resonance between two images, natural diction, sabi, and wabi—and the absence of explicitly stating emotion, intellectualization/philosophizing/moral commentary, anthropomorphizing, aphorisms/epigrams/telegrams/bumper stickers/headlines, and mere statements of fact.

I think I might have to borrow this at least once, just to see what someone determined to write bad doggererl (is bad doggerel an oxymoron or something far scarier?) ;-)

And if I don't ever see that once only funny refrigerator 'verse' again (and I don't mean Kerouac) I will survive that loss. ;-)

Thanks again for bringing back such a useful report, much appreciated.

Alan

Mary Stevens

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Re: Spanish-language haiku
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2011, 06:35:44 PM »
I just discovered more Spanish-language haiku sources through the NaHaiWriMo link MDW provided at another discussion on this forum:

http://www.dmoz.org/World/Espa%C3%B1ol/Artes/Literatura/G%C3%A9neros/Poes%C3%ADa/Haiku/

hth,

Mary
"A word that breathes distinctly
Has not the power to die..."

            —Emily Dickinson