News:

If you click the "Log In" button and get an error, use this URL to display the forum home page: https://thehaikufoundation.org/forum_sm/

Update any bookmarks you have for the forum to use this URL--not a similar URL that includes "www."
___________
Welcome to The Haiku Foundation forum! Some features and boards are available only to registered members who are logged in. To register, click Register in the main menu below. Click Login to login. Please use a Report to Moderator link to report any problems with a board or a topic.

Main Menu

Rules or Guidelines for One Liner Haiku...

Started by BrokenWordsPoet, May 21, 2014, 12:46:09 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

BrokenWordsPoet

I have not seen guidelines for one line haiku, I have an idea how one line haiku should be written and I am sure there will be those that disagree.  I am not interested in guidelines for advanced haiku poets, I am interest in guidelines for the beginner who is taking baby steps, just to get them started. One searches the internet for guidelines for one line haiku and very little is found.  I am the led of a group of haiku poets, we are all students of the art. We have been having a discussion on this subject and everyone has their own opinions but just what are the guidelines for one line haiku?

To me in one line haiku, one needs to adopt some of the guidelines and rules of a three line haiku.  We all know that a three line haiku can have 17 syllables or less, 12 syllables or less for the phrase and 5 syllables or less for the fragment.  To me any three line haiku can be converted into a one line haiku, because of the break pattern in the structure of haiku.  Therefore why the one line haiku in the first, other than they are pretty or the poets preference for formatting the haiku at the moment. 

One question for me, the three line haiku allows for syllable count 12 or less for a phrase and 5 syllables or less for a fragment, should this be followed in a one line haiku? I feel that one needs to keep a fragment to the size of a fragment and a fragment should never be longer than the phrase.

Best wishes...  BWP...  James...

AlanSummers

Dear James,

Here's a few examples of one line haiku published in haiku publications.   You might be interested in creating a commentary on one or two perhaps?

examples of one line haiku by Alan Summers and various authors

Published one-line haiku by Alan Summers

this small ache and all the rain too robinsong

ants following invisible trials the children

mist and dark I hold onto Little Bear

city of glass the immobilised man small stone counting

long hard rain my compass your true north

lantana the dark-veined tiger nectar-laden

pull of stars turning cold the snail's navigation

all those red apples amongst the blue tit

giallo this restricted area my birthplace

h=k=l=0 each love number sleeps

Hirst's butterflies disturbing the exhibits people

chestnut moon shifting in my memory ghost floors

night-entangled moons treading judas floors

train sitting:facingpeoplei'drathernot   

our pigsilk insults pre-coital manoeuvres playback

the camp fire burns the misty moon halved by thin cloud

nautiluses who remember useful things for only a day

my failed assassin, who has never killed

Seven Sisters the call of owls either side

recurringdream#16.333iso/overbreakfast

Your oily gold in red saffron tea makes me laugh

petrichor this green sunsets in yesterday

curse her Rain falls from a normal blue sky

just me Great Auk I died

Monday's magician of yellow colour of murder

this sorrowing heart fading into plum blossom

crowded train a dozen yellows crackle

macula lutea the snowballs inside dogs

kwĭkˈsĭlˌvər: I've a need for the next biblical cubit

voodoo rain this new light year

Red Sea beat my heart still hydrozoa

Cheshire Moon the cat grins in Farsi

eight thousand li of cloud and moon questions mark

Oak Moon the carpenter's calluses chafing

butterfly dreaming man the Black Butterfly Moon

window-rattling moon I stay up and turn blue

Black Moon my finders keepers Valentine

toys from a distant land scaffolding the fall

ground zero into the new friend's story

sloe-eyed horses in Lichtenstein bubble gum wrappers

messenger shooting crows

soul her fish fingers to the second knuckle

long grass nights star systems in the Big Dipper

corn chaff realising oil as one colour

field of dreams an unborn child's color isn't rapeseed

Pharmakós the name you scratch inside

Blue Moon we don't do one-sided conversations

Old Man's Beard a cyclist wobbles the length of it

sick train the night heron shifts silt for all of us

memory of starlight wink of a one-eyed dog as it sneezes

gliding four sulphur-crested cockatoos a green tinged sundown

black swan rising diving into cloudless sky

moviescreenflickerfullolifecanvasthin 

snowfall she takes her daffodils Underground

in-betweenness the grey heron seals the leaks of light

dustbunnies the coins of small change me

dragon tattoo my skinned fables of depression

the drum of the rain ghosting bare hands

leaves begin to fall this face too evolves from fish

the blue note I turn to wind-spun snow

irezumi the river coils into heron

intermittent rain I shed another crow

tearing up snow falls slowly a kind of blue


Published one-line haiku by various writers past and current:

a love letter to the butterfly gods with strategic misspellings
- Chris Gordon

rooks weaving darkness into the dusk
-- David Platt

waterbug running by the frogulp
-- Alan Pizzarelli

a stick goes over the falls at sunset
-- Cor van den Heuvel

Ah water-strider never to have left a track!
-- vincent tripi

between the piano's phrases night wind
-- Fred Schofield

in the otherwise still twilight a clamor of robin wings
- Allan Burns

all these sounds not one of them a falling leaf
-- R.C. Matsuo-Allard

an owl hoots darkness down from the hollow oak
- Tombo (Lorraine Ellis Harr)

the blind child reading my poem with her fingertips
-- Elizabeth Searle Lamb

clay on the wheel I confess my faith
- Peggy Willis Lyles

deep inside the faded wood a scarlet maple
-- Nick Avis

pig and i spring rain
- Marlene Mountain

dusk      from rock to rock a waterthrush
- John Wills

pain fading the days back to wilderness
- Jim Kacian

white wind the eyes of the dead seal missing
- Carolyn Hall

the owl's flight unheard stars appear
-- Peter Yovu

the blood rushing through my blowhole winter stars
- Scott Metz

mallards leaving in the water rippled sky
- Penny Harter

Spring thaw          wings beating inside my skull
- George Swede

night rain a calf stands tight by the bull
-- Pamela Brown

touching the ashes of my father
-- Bob Boldman

heading home I return the stone to the river
- Stuart Quine

muzzle of the drinking cow glides across still water
- Janice M. Bostok

I breathe the wind breathes through the aspen
-- Martin Lucas

thrush song a few days before the thrush
- Marlene Mountain

swans      stir of his breath against my hair
- Alexis K. Rotella

lingering on this earth   dried onions
-- Ruby Spriggs

Before we knew its name the indigo bunting
–Peggy Willis Lyles


More rain the sisters slip into their mother tongue

–Scott Metz


shadows darkening three-sevenths of her face in sunlight

–Elizabeth Searle Lamb

mallards leaving in the water rippled sky

–Penny Harter



–Matsuo Allard (b. 1949):

through a column of factory steam the white gull

darkness across the river lights in a mill

higher this time the last salmon

alone at 3:00 a.m.—the door knob turning slowly

an icicle the moon drifting through it

passing clouds only a stand of aspens is in light

deep in my notebook a lily pad floats away



–Jeff Stillman:

cross-examination all morning a slanting rain

cold moon lover all business

wind's second wind dead of winter

sweater mend unraveling . . . winter wears on

briefly the heron's catch shaping its gullet

New Year's morning the rent past due

hazy moon hung over the new year

- e n d -

Quote from: BrokenWordsPoet on May 21, 2014, 12:46:09 PM
I have not seen guidelines for one line haiku, I have an idea how one line haiku should be written and I am sure there will be those that disagree.  I am not interested in guidelines for advanced haiku poets, I am interest in guidelines for the beginner who is taking baby steps, just to get them started. One searches the internet for guidelines for one line haiku and very little is found.  I am the led of a group of haiku poets, we are all students of the art. We have been having a discussion on this subject and everyone has their own opinions but just what are the guidelines for one line haiku?

To me in one line haiku, one needs to adopt some of the guidelines and rules of a three line haiku.  We all know that a three line haiku can have 17 syllables or less, 12 syllables or less for the phrase and 5 syllables or less for the fragment.  To me any three line haiku can be converted into a one line haiku, because of the break pattern in the structure of haiku.  Therefore why the one line haiku in the first, other than they are pretty or the poets preference for formatting the haiku at the moment. 

One question for me, the three line haiku allows for syllable count 12 or less for a phrase and 5 syllables or less for a fragment, should this be followed in a one line haiku? I feel that one needs to keep a fragment to the size of a fragment and a fragment should never be longer than the phrase.

Best wishes...  BWP...  James...
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

AlanSummers

James,

There will also be a dedicated anthology due out that covers the history of one-line haiku by Snapshot Press.

The submission period is now concluded but I thought you might be interested in the details:  www.snapshotpress.co.uk/submissions/one-line_haiku_anthology.htm

Quote from: BrokenWordsPoet on May 21, 2014, 12:46:09 PM
I have not seen guidelines for one line haiku, I have an idea how one line haiku should be written and I am sure there will be those that disagree.  I am not interested in guidelines for advanced haiku poets, I am interest in guidelines for the beginner who is taking baby steps, just to get them started.

I feel part of the answer is the same for advanced readers as well as beginners, and that is to read as many examples in good publications as possible.

Luckily even print magazines such as Modern Haiku and Frogpond have online examples of work published in various print issues of their publications.[/quote]

Quote
One searches the internet for guidelines for one line haiku and very little is found.

It may be difficult to separate the not-so-good internet sites from the good ones.  Here's a few worth reading about one-line haiku:

http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/2010/07/28/12th-sailing-one-line-haiku/

http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/forum_sm/index.php?topic=1094.0

http://www.simplyhaiku.com/SHv2n5/haikuclinic/haikuclinic.html

http://www.marlenemountain.org/1lhaiku/1lhai_contents.html

http://www.poetrysociety.org.nz/node/529


Quote
  I am the led of a group of haiku poets, we are all students of the art. We have been having a discussion on this subject and everyone has their own opinions but just what are the guidelines for one line haiku?

Do you mean you are a leader of a group of haiku poets?

There are no guidelines or rules, or regulations as such although we can often work out what works and doesn't.   Japanese haikai verses were written vertically as a single line so Western practitioners, and others, decided to attempt one-line horizontal haiku, although the dynamics change.

Quote
To me in one line haiku, one needs to adopt some of the guidelines and rules of a three line haiku. 

Possibly, yes.  It depends what you state as rules (or guidelines).

Quote
We all know that a three line haiku can have 17 syllables or less, 12 syllables or less for the phrase and 5 syllables or less for the fragment.

The syllablic side of poetry isn't as much a concern for modern haiku writers in English, but often we write one that is less than 17 English-language syllables, and closer to the duration of 17-on ('on' is the Japanese counting system for their sound units, think 'mora').

Quote
To me any three line haiku can be converted into a one line haiku, because of the break pattern in the structure of haiku.

Many of us would disagree, otherwise why not write an English-language haiku in three lines anyway?

Have you read the latest Norton haiku anthology:

Haiku in English: The First Hundred Years (W. W. Norton 2013)

ISBN 978-0-393-23947-8

Haiku in English
The First Hundred Years

http://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail.aspx?ID=4294972241

And look inside page:
http://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail-inside.aspx?ID=4294972241&CTYPE=G

There are many examples of one-line haiku through the decades in the book.[/quote]


Quote
Therefore why the one line haiku in the first, other than they are pretty or the poets preference for formatting the haiku at the moment. 

That's down to the individual poets I guess.  Why do others write English-langauge haiku in three lines (and heroic couplets or quatrains many decades ago) when Japanese-language haiku is written as one line?

Perhaps all poets are eccentric, or that a line of poetry is a potent device.  I'll have to leave that to each and every poet to answer.  8)

Quote
One question for me, the three line haiku allows for syllable count 12 or less for a phrase and 5 syllables or less for a fragment, should this be followed in a one line haiku?

I think you will find that writers of haiku be it three lines, or four lines (like Tito aka Stephen Gill of Japan) or two lines as well as one line don't always think of fragments and phrases as syllabic structures.   There are many variations over the decades, and the use of negative space, juxtaposition, sometimes a seasonal reference, and the cutting of the haiku in two are what counts first and foremost.

Quote
I feel that one needs to keep a fragment to the size of a fragment and a fragment should never be longer than the phrase.

Best wishes...  BWP...  James...

I guess if a fragment was longer than a phrase than the fragment automatically becomes the phrase and the phrase, if shorter, is the fragment.  Or, as some Japanese haiku writers do, they write haiku that go beyond 5-on 7-on 5-on and can be longer than even a tanka.

The writing of haiku is a fascinating discipline and lifelong activity, with all its advantages, its controversaries, and personal growth.

kind regards,

Alan


Quote from: BrokenWordsPoet on May 21, 2014, 12:46:09 PM
I have not seen guidelines for one line haiku, I have an idea how one line haiku should be written and I am sure there will be those that disagree.  I am not interested in guidelines for advanced haiku poets, I am interest in guidelines for the beginner who is taking baby steps, just to get them started. One searches the internet for guidelines for one line haiku and very little is found.  I am the led of a group of haiku poets, we are all students of the art. We have been having a discussion on this subject and everyone has their own opinions but just what are the guidelines for one line haiku?

To me in one line haiku, one needs to adopt some of the guidelines and rules of a three line haiku.  We all know that a three line haiku can have 17 syllables or less, 12 syllables or less for the phrase and 5 syllables or less for the fragment.  To me any three line haiku can be converted into a one line haiku, because of the break pattern in the structure of haiku.  Therefore why the one line haiku in the first, other than they are pretty or the poets preference for formatting the haiku at the moment. 

One question for me, the three line haiku allows for syllable count 12 or less for a phrase and 5 syllables or less for a fragment, should this be followed in a one line haiku? I feel that one needs to keep a fragment to the size of a fragment and a fragment should never be longer than the phrase.

Best wishes...  BWP...  James...
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

Nicole Andrews

Hi Alan,

Thanks for your informative posts. The one liners I think have totally different rhythms, fluid and circular with cut points that appear and disappear. Within one poem several different readings can be made re-
your poem..

ants following invisible trials the children

The one liner weaves in and out and has a feeling of more wordplay than a three line haiku. The stress points are different too...It's all a bit jazz!

Regards
Nicole




In small proportions
We just beauties see
And in short measures
Life may perfect be

Ben Jonson

setting fire to the landscape-
http://nicolethelocalartist.wordpress.com

Johannes S. H. Bjerg

Alan has already put up a lot of fine examples of one-line haiku (the term "one-liner" refers to a joke) I'll just ad a sequence published in Modern Haiku (can't recall which, though)

winter etudes


Matins a D-minor chord while the coffee brews

almond flowers silent etudes for a skull

how this waltz grew mute and fifty mysteries on a chain

where The Book would have been rusty nibs and laudanum

moorish tiles all faces turned inwards

coughing roses in winter it's plausible

Prime a halfhearted mazurka and the mist the mist the mist

a faint spatter of blood it's nothing my dear

between the screams of pigs the sound of an angry pen

in Polish he longs for Paris Terce

it fades as we smoke the kids are outside

the piano sleeps praying they still walk the hallways

ivory kneeling for Sext in C-major

it's time but it's not a red bougainvillea and she slams the door

she is away the middle four octaves are ebony

this note tells about rain None

a notebook with corrections major to minor and back

just this word nocturne and a day has passed

Vespers as the winter settles in the lungs

lush valley the sunset enters his mouth

how many more breaths and scales Compline


--

further reading than the excellent books suggested might be "Right Under the Big Sky I don't Wear a Hat", Hiroaki Sato's one-line translation of Hosai Ozaki, Jim Kacian's "where i leave off" that also works as an "over-view" of various "constructions".

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk