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Messages - pottygok

#1
I haven't seen it mentioned, so I'd recommend Dennis Washburn's Tale of Genji translation on Norton. It's unabridged, and considered pretty competent in terms of accuracy.

When we studied The Pillow Book in school, we used the McKinney translation, which I think is better than the Morris or Waley. I've also heard VERY good things about Henitiuk's research on this book, but have never read it.
#2
Quote from: meghalls on April 26, 2021, 09:14:42 PM
With apologies to Lorraine Pester, I have deleted my posts which were an attempt to start a discussion
on haiku and poetry.

Yup. Doesn't seem too many folks on this forum want an "in depth discussion," which is a shame. Keep your chin up!
#3
The Issa one I know is "The Spring of My Life" by Hamill, so I'll check out Yuasa to compare. But something like Morikawa's Honchō Monzen doesn't seem to have been translated, yet. I'm just curious because it seems that what haibun was in Japan isn't what we call haibun now, and I'm wondering if there's a way to learn from what haibun was and create haibun in new directions.
#4
I'm trying to find translations of pre-20th century haibun other than Oku no Hosomichi. I know others exist, but beyond Keene, Hamill, and a few others, I have no idea which translators have approached this or, alternately, which haibun exist that haven't been translated. Any titles would be great.
#5
Clearly not in these forums.

Seriously, I asked a question, had some OWM tell me how famous he was and how he knew everyone in the world of haiku without actually answering my question, and then when I called him on his BS, I got dumped on.

So I deleted my question, as it clearly wasn't anything anyone actually wants to discuss and address. Which is fine, but once the OP asks someone to stop, it's polite to actually stop.

You have not; your "two-way street" is clearly a one-way, dead-end alley and I'm in your headlights while you floor the gas.

Seriously. Stop responding to this post.
#6
- 𝐎𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐢 𝐒𝐮𝐛𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐆𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 -
ᴡʜᴀᴛ ᴡᴇ ᴀʀᴇ ʟᴏᴏᴋɪɴɢ ꜰᴏʀ

Otoroshi is looking for horrorku, horror tanka, and horror haibun. We also purchase cover art. We follow the modern, English understanding of these genres as they have been adapted to English since the middle of the 20th century. We expect people submitting to be familiar with these conventions.
For horrorku, we are looking for clear, concise imagery with a strong juxtaposition. We prefer three-line poems, but single-line poems with clear juxtaposition will also be welcome.
For horror tanka, we are looking for clear, concise imagery as well as an emotional element.
For horror haibun, we are looking for pieces of no more than 100 words with a clear shift between the prose and the poetry section.

For cover art, we are looking for pieces that are clearly within the horror genre. These images must be PG-13, so please no nudity, limited violence, and limited gore.

ɢᴜɪᴅᴇʟɪɴᴇꜱ

The Submission may include any or all of the following:
· Up to seven (7) horrorku or horror tanka
· Up to three (3) haibun
· Up to five (5) pieces of cover art

All submissions must be original, unpublished work that is not under consideration by a print or web-based journal. Posts in closed, critique-oriented groups and social media sites are acceptable for submission, but public posts on forums such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are not. By submitting a piece to us, you are guaranteeing that it is your original work and not under consideration or published anywhere else in the world.

E-mail submission is required. Type poems into the body of the e-mail; no attachments of poetry will be opened. For art submissions, please include all five pieces in a .PDF file or send us a link to a private gallery. If we purchase an art piece for our cover, we will ask that you provide a 300 dpi version of said piece.

E-mail Address: OtoroshiJournal@gmail.com
Use the subject line: Otoroshi Submission.

Please include a cover letter noting location in the world. Please include handles for Instagram and Twitter for promotional purposes.
At this time, only one submission per issue will be considered unless the editors directly request a second submission.

Submission periods are one month long:
· January for the Spring Issue
· April for the Summer Issue
· July for the Fall Issue
· October for the Winter Issue

Acceptances will be sent shortly after the end of each period.

Payment
We pay on publication. Currently, we offer a token payment via PayPal only.
The rates are as follows:
· ​Horrorku: $1.00 each
· ​Horror Tanka: $1.00 each
· ​​Horror Haibun: $1.00 each
· Cover Art: $10.00 each

We are purchasing the rights to print your work in our electronic journal. We may also use your poems in multimedia promotion of the journal. At the end of the year, we will collect all four issues into one Print-on-Demand version of the journal. By submitting your work for publication, you are agreeing to these terms.

ᴄᴏɴᴛᴇɴᴛ ꜱᴛᴀᴛᴇᴍᴇɴᴛ

While the editors of Otoroshi acknowledge that some of the most horrific events of mankind stem from hate and violence, we seek to be an inclusive market. We also actively strive to represent a diverse array of voices. Therefore, we will not tolerate racism, discrimination, hate-speech, bullying, or harassment of any kind and will not publish any work that includes such language or imagery.

Furthermore, while we are a horror magazine, we acknowledge that sexual threats and sexual violence can be triggering for many readers. Therefore, sexual violence, as well as violence against animals or children, will be an extremely hard sell and will almost certainly be rejected unless handled in a progressive way. While it has become a common trope in horror to empathize with the stalker or serial killer character, this is not the market for such work.
#7
flowerfox,

I have deleted my comments as the discussion about book publishers is clearly not a welcome topic and has obviously been shut down by the powers that be. I'd ask that you respect that.

Thank you.
#8
Deleted post. Clearly not a welcome discussion.
#9
- 𝐎𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐢 𝐒𝐮𝐛𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐆𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 -
ᴡʜᴀᴛ ᴡᴇ ᴀʀᴇ ʟᴏᴏᴋɪɴɢ ꜰᴏʀ

Otoroshi is looking for horrorku, horror tanka, and horror haibun. We also purchase cover art. We follow the modern, English understanding of these genres as they have been adapted to English since the middle of the 20th century. We expect people submitting to be familiar with these conventions.
For horrorku, we are looking for clear, concise imagery with a strong juxtaposition. We prefer three-line poems, but single-line poems with clear juxtaposition will also be welcome.
For horror tanka, we are looking for clear, concise imagery as well as an emotional element.
For horror haibun, we are looking for pieces of no more than 100 words with a clear shift between the prose and the poetry section.

For cover art, we are looking for pieces that are clearly within the horror genre. These images must be PG-13, so please no nudity, limited violence, and limited gore.

ɢᴜɪᴅᴇʟɪɴᴇꜱ

The Submission may include any or all of the following:
· Up to seven (7) horrorku or horror tanka
· Up to three (3) haibun
· Up to five (5) pieces of cover art

All submissions must be original, unpublished work that is not under consideration by a print or web-based journal. Posts in closed, critique-oriented groups and social media sites are acceptable for submission, but public posts on forums such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are not. By submitting a piece to us, you are guaranteeing that it is your original work and not under consideration or published anywhere else in the world.

E-mail submission is required. Type poems into the body of the e-mail; no attachments of poetry will be opened. For art submissions, please include all five pieces in a .PDF file or send us a link to a private gallery. If we purchase an art piece for our cover, we will ask that you provide a 300 dpi version of said piece.

E-mail Address: OtoroshiJournal@gmail.com
Use the subject line: Otoroshi Submission.

Please include a cover letter noting location in the world. Please include handles for Instagram and Twitter for promotional purposes.
At this time, only one submission per issue will be considered unless the editors directly request a second submission.

Submission periods are one month long:
· January for the Spring Issue
· April for the Summer Issue
· July for the Fall Issue
· October for the Winter Issue

Acceptances will be sent shortly after the end of each period.

Payment
We pay on publication. Currently, we offer a token payment via PayPal only.
The rates are as follows:
· ​Horrorku: $1.00 each
· ​Horror Tanka: $1.00 each
· ​​Horror Haibun: $1.00 each
· Cover Art: $10.00 each

We are purchasing the rights to print your work in our electronic journal. We may also use your poems in multimedia promotion of the journal. At the end of the year, we will collect all four issues into one Print-on-Demand version of the journal. By submitting your work for publication, you are agreeing to these terms.

ᴄᴏɴᴛᴇɴᴛ ꜱᴛᴀᴛᴇᴍᴇɴᴛ

While the editors of Otoroshi acknowledge that some of the most horrific events of mankind stem from hate and violence, we seek to be an inclusive market. We also actively strive to represent a diverse array of voices. Therefore, we will not tolerate racism, discrimination, hate-speech, bullying, or harassment of any kind and will not publish any work that includes such language or imagery.

Furthermore, while we are a horror magazine, we acknowledge that sexual threats and sexual violence can be triggering for many readers. Therefore, sexual violence, as well as violence against animals or children, will be an extremely hard sell and will almost certainly be rejected unless handled in a progressive way. While it has become a common trope in horror to empathize with the stalker or serial killer character, this is not the market for such work.
#10
Deleted post. Clearly not a welcome discussion.
#11
Deleted post. Clearly not a welcome discussion.
#12
Quote from: XYZ on July 18, 2019, 11:07:32 AM
When I started writing haiku, I referred to the list of kigo for inspiration.

This was exactly what I was going to say! I think kigo are a great way to generate ideas about haiku, and sometimes I'll write half a dozen haiku with the same kigo before I find one that sticks.  I also find it interesting to look at how various translators approach the same kigo with different language. Sometimes one phrasing triggers something that another one didn't, so that's a good place to start, too.

I also think regional kigo are quite important, and would love to see more of those used in haiku. I wrote an essay about this a while back, but the idea of kigo focused on a particular region is really interesting and something that US authors should explore more.
#13
I've been thinking a lot about haiku aesthetics lately. Clearly, there are Japanese aesthetics we're all aware of: wabi, sabi, mono no aware, ma, yugen, makoto, etc.

But what are the Western aesthetics that we bring to haiku? I'm curious to know if the past 100 years of haiku study in the United States and elsewhere, and at least 50-75 years of solid haiku writing by various practitioners, has created any sort of Western aesthetics that we should consider when writing haiku? Susan Antolin speaks of "understatement" in one of her essays, and Lee Gurga has an essay about aesthetics that's more of a summary, but I'm wondering if there are others.

What do you think? What are aesthetics that you bring to haiku? What are aesthetics that you think are important, either inherited from Japanese or other poetic traditions?
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