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A Sense of Place: THE SHORE – taste

 

 

A Sense of Place

In his essay ‘So:ba’, given at the International Haiku Conference (SUNY Plattsburgh, NY, 2008) and published serially in Frogpond, Jim Kacian discusses the concept of ba:

“If you look up ba in any Japanese-English Dictionary you’ll find it means “place” or “site” or “occasion”. And these are all true in the most general sense—ba is a pointer to a kind of awareness that something of importance is happening in time and space.”

So here we are…

In the following weeks we will get back to haiku basics and explore specific locations with an emphasis on the senses, and with the intention of improving our own haiku practice. Ideally, participants will select an actual location that they can visit, or a location from memory that they have visited in the past. Failing that, we always have our imaginations – and you’re invited to join in the fun! Submit an original unpublished poem (or poems) via our Contact Form by Sunday midnight on the theme of the week, including your name as you would like it to appear, and place of residence. I will select from these for the column, and add commentary.

 

next week’s theme:  THE SHORE – touch

Our final exploration of the shore – if possible, the same actual ocean or lake or river or pond as in previous weeks – but now we explore the sense of touch… what does it feel like?

I look forward to reading your submissions.

 

A Sense of Place:  THE SHORE – taste

Reading these submissions made me hungry! Some of the poems that follow rely more heavily on senses other than taste. Continuing from some of the comments on the blog post last week – it is clear that smell and taste are related – what I am hoping for is that poets concentrate on the ways that the senses are different… in other words, I am hoping for poems that are smell and not taste, or taste and not smell…

uni harvest
i close my eyes
to listen to my taste buds

(*uni is a Japanese word for what is commonly known as sea urchin roe. Technically, it is actually the reproductive organs (gonads). The gonads are scraped off a spiny shell and mostly eaten raw. It is also referred to as the foie gras of the sea or ice cream of the sea. It’s usually hard to describe its taste when eaten the first time)

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

This poet successfully introduces sight and hearing into the mix, which is most appropriate after my comments about taste and smell above…

beach house
digging for shells
in the omelette

C.R. Harper

The second line of this poem (called a hinge or swing phrase) reads one way with line one, and a different way with the third line – a very efficient way to communicate more information in a short poem…

strong winds
brushing the sand
from my sandwich

Mary Hanrahan

Here again, like a broken record, an example of so much said in so few words… a shore setting that includes taste… with enough unsaid that the reader is involved in the interpretation of the poem… and with the addition of a play on sandwich…

aloha oe…
slowly steamed lau lau’s
laced with sadness

Pris Campbell

Even not knowing that the first line is the title of a song, the reader may be moved by a sense of loss here – a parting, and possibly a death – as many know that ‘aloha’ can mean hello or goodbye… after some research (including listening to the song, and learning about the native Hawaiian dish lau lau) the poem simply gets better…

lakeside –
the mosquitoes
find me tasty

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio   USA

This poem may speak more directly to those readers who live in areas where mosquitoes are plentiful… like the Yukon…

Here are the rest of my selections for this week:

cigars and wine they meet on the beach

Adrian Bouter

 

standing in surf…
on my fingertips
i taste far lands

Al Gallia
Lafayette, Louisiana

 

breaking my fast
the mermaid’s kiss
of samphire

Alan Summers
Wiltshire, England

 

beachside revelry
a hint of brine
in the wedding cake

Amy Losak

 

beach holiday
the taste of salt
on my lover’s back

Andrew Shimield
UK

 

an old river –
taste on the lips
of wild blackberries

Angela Giordano

 

evening on the lake –
the taste of rain
in a cup of tea

Anna Maria Domburg-Sancristoforo

 

night chill
grandma adds sea salt
to her bowl of rice

Anthony Rabang

 

sharing cheese popcorn
with the seagulls
breakfast treat

Ardelle Hollis Ray
Las Vegas, NV

 

beach sand –
a briny taste
to her navel

arvinder kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

dried salt
on sunburnt skin
summer love

Barbara Kaufmann
NY

 

tingling taste buds
at a midnight shrimp boil
carpe diem

Barbara Tate
Winchester, Tn

 

home at last
the lingering taste
of  sea wind

Blessed Ayeyame
Ughelli, Nigeria

 

steamed lobsters give up the sea

Bob Whitmire
Round Pond, Maine

 

as the lake darkens
a log fire flares up
fresh taste of trout

Carmen Sterba

 

holiday romance candyfloss kisses

carol jones
Wales

 

Marina Del Rey
a taste of the sea
at the clam bar

carol raisfeld

 

surging waves…
the taste
of her tan lines

Chad Lee Robinson
Pierre, SD

 

Venice Beach boardwalk
salty food
meets salty lips

Charles Harmon
City of Lost Angels, California

 

trudging deep sand
on her lips
brow sweat

Christina Chin
Kuching, Sarawak

 

the taste of sand
between my teeth
sea swim summer

Christina Sng

 

peppermint
crunching my stick
of Brighton rock

Christine Eales
UK

 

a briny gulp
sears the throat
body surfing

Claire Vogel Camargo

 

beach breeze
dries my lips
and your salty kiss

Connie Meester

 

seaside honeymoon –
the taste of the sea
in her belly button

Corine Timmer

 

dark water reflections…
a sea-tinged taste
of tears

Craig Kittner
Wilmington, NC

 

empty fish-hook
salty taste of wild swiss chard
for dinner

Danijela Grbelja

 

day at the sea we decide on a Magnum lunch

David Jacobs
London, UK

 

end of beach day
the taste of salt
on my skin

Debbi Antebi
London, UK

 

solitude
a loon and I taste
the evening

Debbie Strange
Canada

 

brief taste
of peanut butter
my gull-stolen sandwich

Deborah P Kolodji
Temple City, California

 

fresh steamer clams
dripping with warm butter
savory sea gifts

Dianne Moritz

 

secluded cove
the taste of sea salts
on your skin

dl mattila
USA

 

big fishing is over
adriatic tuna
overflows the mouth

Dubravka Šcukanec
Zagreb, Croatia

 

winter sea
the taste of snow
on my lips

Eufemia Griffo

 

open sea
the forgotten taste
of eternity

Eva Limbach
Germany

 

famous tangy mustard
squishing from the edges –
boardwalk knishes

Giedra Kregzdys

 

beach snacks
in a ziplock bag
Mom thinks of everything

Greer Woodward
Waimea, HI

 

corn crab and butter
all lightly seasoned
with sand

Gregory Longenecker

 

fishermen cheers
all at the shore
tasting grilled sepia

Guliz Mutlu

 

sun, sea…
the licking of salt
from my wounds

Helen Buckingham

 

beach walk the bitter taste of his words

Hifsa Ashraf
Pakistan

 

alert
on its lakeside rock
the snake tastes the air

Ingrid Baluchi

 

beach picnic
a salty breeze
seasons the salad

Isabel Caves
Auckland, New Zealand

 

letting it roll
around on my tongue –
salt water taffy

Jessica Malone Latham
Sonoma County, California USA

 

moored
the first sip
of single malt

Joanne van Helvoort

 

sunlight on white sand
the sky tilts electric blue
over the ice cream

John Hawkhead

 

the flavor of fresh trout
after
a city visit

Judith Hishikawa
West Burke, VT

 

The taste of oysters –
memories of the silent farewell
that summer

Julia Guzmán

 

surfside tiki bar
mai tais and margaritas
hold the salt

Karen Conrads Wibell

 

salt kissed lips
our seaside honeymoon
fish supper

Karen Harvey
Cymru/Wales

 

old salt
he knows each sea
by its taste

Kath Abela Wilson
on the shore at Santa Barbara, California

 

sting of Irish coffee
mellowed
by sea mist

Kathleen Mazurowski
Chicago IL

 

seaside campfire
the ebb & flow
of s’mores

Ken Olson
Yakima WA

 

hot dogs
with a side of sand
beach bbq

Kimberly Esser
Los Angeles

 

empty beach
I french kiss
lukewarm raindrops

Lamart Cooper

 

Wave-tumbled
watching the life pass
tasting the sand

Laurie Greer
Washington, D.C.

 

light as a sea breeze
pink spun-sugar clouds
melt on the tongue

Lisa Cherrett

 

Brighton Beach
the taste of vodka
and Russian laughter

Lori Zajkowski

 

warm backwash…
the popsicle stick
still in the mouth

calda risacca… lo stecco di ghiacciolo / ancora in bocca

Lucia Cardillo

 

a sudden mouthful
of Atlantic
Sennen sunrise

Lucy Whitehead
Essex, UK

 

Red popsicle
trickles down her chin
Berry flavored grin

m. shane pruett

 

taste of freedom
in rhythm with the waves
a fisherman’s boat

Madhuri Pillai

 

fresh oyster
I swallow
the sea

Margaret Walker

 

sour and cold
the taste of the morning –
fishing boat

Margherita Petriccione

 

worlds famous
clam chowder
all I taste is sand

Margo Williams

 

seaside swing
the lush of ice cream
for baby and me

Marilyn Appl Walker

 

beach bonfire
tastes of childhood
in the flames

Marilyn Ashbaugh
Edwardsburg, MI

 

learning to swim
a mouthful
of salty water

Marina Bellini

 

Sea of Tranquility
a mouthful of cotton candy
dissolves on the tongue

Mark Gilbert

 

stormy sea
in the mouth
sand and salt

Marta Chocilowska

 

sea kelp
the taste of salt
in your hair

Martha Magenta
England, UK

 

Cape May cottages –
Victorian taste
of seaside gingerbread

Mary Ellen Gambutti

 

moultie creek
the lump of a frog
in the heron’s throat

Michael Henry Lee

 

shore leave
the taste of salt water
lingers on her lips

Michael H. Lester
Los Angeles CA USA

 

Scheveningen pier…
a toothless girl shares her
salt water taffy

Michael Smeer
Haarlemmermeer, The Netherlands

 

salt rings
his margarita’s lip
surfside café

Michele L. Harvey

 

dipping
the seagull swallows
tail first

Mike Gallagher
Ireland

 

beach front…
the fresh taste
of seafood

Mohammad Azim Khan
Peshawar Pakistan

 

Lake Erie catch
lemon squeezed
onto fried perch

Nancy Brady
Huron, Ohio

 

fleeing into sea
from the raging fires…
taste of tears

Natalia Kuznetsova
Russia

 

heavy seas –
fresh drops of salt
on the  lips

Nazarena Rampini
Italy

 

the refreshing pulp
of a watermelon
hot beach day

Olivier Schopfer
Geneva, Switzerland

 

petal by petal
the taste of dew
on a beach rose

Pat Davis

 

among the rocks
gathering bright sea lettuce
delicious with winkles

Paul Geiger

 

drowning not waving
salt, mud and rotting fish
fill my throat

Pauline O’Carolan

 

seagulls skim the surf
an approaching storm
on my tongue

Peggy Bilbro
Huntsville, Alabama

 

ocean swim
the taste of
a hundred shipwrecks

Peter Jastermsky

 

beach BBQ
the child’s first taste
of charcoal

Rachel Sutcliffe

 

sea sail -deep water
eels- mouth waters
the very sight

Radhamani  Sarma
Chennai, India

 

40’s sea shore birthday party
the cake tastes
salty too

Radostina Dragostinova
Bulgaria

 

sputtering words
after a crashing wave
the taste of seawater

Randy Brooks

 

first cigarette
impressing girls
on the beach

Rehn Kovacic

 

umami :: death poem of a fish plate

Réka Nyitrai

 

seasalt spray
the taste of mother’s
goodbye kiss

Roberta Beary
County Mayo Ireland

 

every flavor in the rainbow snow cone stand

Robin Smith
Wilmington, DE

 

baker beach bluffs –
summer strawberry wine
most sweet on her lips

robyn brooks
usa

 

beach bonfire
marshmallow kisses
in pink moonlight

Ron C. Moss
Tasmania, Australia

 

St. Pete sunset
your kisses
just touching my lips

Ronald K. Craig
Batavia, OH  USA

 

refreshing bath –
the taste of sea and salt
on my lips

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

salt water taffy
and Boardwalk fries
my first kiss on the pier

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

the same dream
my dad and I
taste salted shrimps

Serhiy Shpychenko
Kyiv, Ukraine

 

inhale the taste of the beach on the wind

shandon land

 

midnight swim
he hands me a cup
of black coffee

Skaidrite Stelzer
Toledo, Ohio

 

walk along the sea
the vanilla flavor drips
down the beard

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

beachside fish fry stall
a hungry vendor
sells the last piece

Srinivasa Rao Sambangi
Hyderabad, India

 

beach bonfire
one marshmallow kiss
leads to another

Stephen A. Peters

 

beach picnic
the taste of savory
in granny’s bucket

Sudebi Singha
India

 

first trip to the shore
the baby closes his eyes
to sun warmed milk

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, CA, USA

 

lakeside walk
the saltiness
of our kiss

Tia Haynes
Lakewood, Ohio

 

wave kissed shoreline
the taste of you on my lips
all sound fades away

Tim Heaney
Atlanta, Ga. USA

 

dinner for two
in the mussels
moonlight

Tsanka Shishkova

 

beachside café
the rotten taste
of your lies

Vandana Parashar

 

summer flavor of the sun sand bass

Victor Ortiz
Bellingham, WA

 

beach ice cream
the taste of vanilla
at times gritty

Vishnu Kapoor

 

tasting new flavor
sea salt
on her lips

Wakako Rollinger
Topanga, CA

 

oysters on crushed ice
a taste of our origins
in salty oceans

Will Nixon

 

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada and an Associate Member of the League of Canadian Poets. She recently co-edited an anthology of crime-themed haiku called Body of Evidence: a collection of killer ’ku.

 

This Post Has 68 Comments

  1. Nice blog. Sounds like every one is interesting for picnic. A new spot discover “The Bhit Khori Beach” near mubarak village . It was awesome place and people are going and enjoy there picnic.

  2. Sorry this is a bit delayed – have been offline for a while – but thanks, as ever, Katherine and congratulations to everyone on another great set!

    1. thanks for submitting, Margo! couldn’t do anything without all these fabulous submissions! kj

    1. Hi Ian!
      do submit on the Contact Form – now I am looking for the sense of touch at the shore…

  3. Thank you Kathy for the inclusion in this collection! The haiku and comments are very enjoyable and insightful. Keep up the great work everyone!

  4. thanks again Kathy . . . it’s good we are staying near the water, with all the wildfires! my heart goes out to California and the Pacific Northwest. Fire Season starts soon.

  5. I am enjoying the sense of “taste” in all these places. It is almost like traveling. Thanks

  6. I guess, having stuck with ‘my’ lake here in Macedonia, taste and smells are less prevalent than those by the sea, so it was good to be reminded of saltiness in nearly all of these poems. Particularly resonant, and poignant, for me:
    .
    Srinavasa Rao Sambangi’s
    .
    beachside fish stall
    a hungry vendor
    sells the last piece
    .
    and Kath Abela Wilson’s
    .
    old salt
    he knows each sea
    by its taste
    .
    Thank you, Kathy, for including mine again.

  7. Thanks Kathy for a wonderful selection! Thank you so much for including mine.

  8. I agree with Alan Summers, that this is a fine collection of haiku. The one’s that stick with me are: “beach house” by CR Harper, “lakeside” by Valentina Ranaldi-Adams, “Scheveningen pier” by Michael Smeer, and “fresh oyster” by Margaret Walker. I am happy to be included in this collection.

  9. .
    When many of us think of taste it’s often about food or drink, unless we are in a highly insecure situation, which I have some experience.
    .
    As the exercise was to write about taste in connection with a body of water, namely a shore or river, in particular, I tend to think about our hunter-gatherer ancestry, and not other areas of taste. After all, bodies of water offer up the idea of fresh fish, seafood, useful vegetation that is edible etc…
    .
    But of course around bodies of water are other aspects and dangers, man-made or other-animal risk. I’ve tasted fear, over-load of adrenaline before, during, after, and dealing with sudden death is intensely taste, and smell, and memory-invasive for months after, for complete strangers just dying naturally but suddenly.
    .
    I’ve smelt and tasted copper and iron, ingredients of blood, mostly my own, but not always: The smell of blood can be a taste, not literally licking it off someone or something. Yes, we don’t actually taste/smell metals in isolation, it’s about our sweat and oils, of course.
    .
    When doing checks and searches for suspect explosive devices, mostly away from bodies of water, you get a sense of smell regarding potential atmosphere aka risk factors. When I was trained, along with others, with an officer attached to the Special Air Services, it was important to know the smell of marzipan wasn’t good, because it wasn’t a birthday cake it was old-fashioned, out of date very old explosives that have sweated, and therefore more volatile than usual. You get to use your mouth as well as your nose, without making physical contact e.g. ingesting, to sense danger in different surroundings and situations.
    .
    Like a dog that can taste smells like colour, perhaps, I could taste and smell “wavelengths” or “ripples” of tension. This was very much the case when unbeknownst to me, when I was in St Pauls, Bristol (England) I saw no danger, no large groups, no tension, but the hairs on my neck rose, and my skin prickled, and I could taste extreme danger. It was the April 1980s riots due to extreme incompetency by the police (I can’t say more, but I was ashamed). Oddly Raymond Mighty because a musician later, alongside many others, on the wrong side of the law, and Smith and Mighty was part of the early wave of the Bristol Sound – a phenomenon I felt I’d never experience, but heard about amusingly, while working in Liverpool for an artists’ agency had Paul McCartney’s brother on their books.
    .
    I guess there are numerous types of taste and tastes, but predominately as we are a food obsessed society from time immemorial, it’s first and foremost with us.
    .
    By the way I am not the only haiku poet that has checked and dealt with explosives, and other security situations, it’s not that uncommon, that’s the state of the world, too many of us are put into situations that should never be normalised “into” the 21st century, let along the post-World War(s) latter half of the 20th Century.
    .
    Wikipedia (and by the way I donated a full £10, but everyone else could give just £2, and only once a year, and save this resource we all use, even in tandem with others) says this about taste:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taste
    .
    I guess they should also include ‘sixth sense’ which is as much a taste, as it is with other partner senses.
    .
    So we are first and foremost hunter-gatherers, and when in a non-successful (non-feudal) system early humans spent the majority of every single day-lit entity (seven days a week) searching and acquiring food, and water. Later, when retail came about, taste became a mental aberration, and some spend hours a day, and lots of money television or internet buying unnecessary extravagances, because we have been taught, however badly, taste.
    .
    This feature is so successful I cannot individually comment, but I am sure others will pick examples, and even with overlap, we should develop an interesting dialog.
    .
    What I found interesting is that there were at least 31 direct mentions of ‘salt’ and many more indirect suggestions, including my own. But also many other food or liquid tasting examples plus ones that I couldn’t let go without acknowledging, however fine everyone’s haiku were!
    .
    .
    beach house
    digging for shells
    in the omelette
    .
    C.R. Harper
    .
    .
    A wonderful use of using the middle line as a pivot/swing/hinge thus making the verse an invisible four line poem.

    beach house
    digging for shells
    .
    digging for shells
    in the omelette
    .
    .
    Beach houses make me think of the Betty Blue/37° 2 le matin French film, and I automatically become sad. It was my first French film (I think) and I was taken by my French girlfriend to an art centre movie house, not knowing how the movie opened. I adore the soundtrack too, it plays into my often deep melancholy. Wonderful haiku, and making the pivot line device fresh and original.
    .
    .

    aloha oe…
    slowly steamed lau lau’s
    laced with sadness
    .
    Pris Campbell
    .
    .
    A sensuousness of a poem even before I break it down. Wonderful use of poetic technique and using a strong verb (for haiku perhaps) to make it swat my senses. It would also make for a fantastic first half of a tanka, something to ponder too, but immensely satisfying on my tongue, both the physical one, and my mind’s tongue.
    .
    .

    surging waves…
    the taste
    of her tan lines
    .
    Chad Lee Robinson
    .
    .
    Well, I’ve never tasted Dakota substances in any form or manner so I’ll take Chad’s word he was Burt Lancaster to a Dakota Deborah Kerr! A brilliant haiku!
    .
    .
     

     

    peppermint
    crunching my stick
    of Brighton rock
    .

    Christine Eales
    .
    .
    This switches on the taste button(s) from Richard Attenborough and the original and best Brighton Rock movie, to the first excitement of a seaside holiday and imbibing via shockwaves the iconic Brighton Rock stick of candy with either the town’s name ALL THE WAY through, or I LOVE YOU or another name or message. Adding peppermint brings a sharp tang of loved and loathed flavor used in chocolate and other candies, and toothpaste! There are even numerous peppermint drinks alcoholic or free, but never of that double-edged taste and smell forever wrapped around each other in a demonic death twirl. Wonderful! Using the sound as a taste is genius, but Christine, as I told her in the company of Heron’s Nest John Stevenson, has a knack of combining senses that are original and fresh.
    .
    .

    day at the sea we decide on a Magnum lunch
    .

    David Jacobs
    .
    .
    I immediately envision Dirty Harry at Clacton on Sea or Margate instead of San Francisco, and the smell of cordite for a mid-day meal. I’m on sensory overload! 🙂 Would it be better or more sinister without ‘lunch’, I can’t say, but I do get Hypoglycaemia sometimes. The alliteration is doubly neat (no pun intended) because it’s not just day and decide (three d’s) but sea(side) and de(cide) aural and perceived rhyme, and a hidden pseudo-d or useful hard consonance with Magnum. It’s all too 9mm for me, or is it? Superb and deadly, that’s David’s haiku as a rule. 🙂
    .
    .
     
    winter sea
    the taste of snow
    on my lips
    .
    Eufemia Griffo
    .
    .
    Poetic technique as well, but just beautiful, beautiful.

    1. Having worked in chemistry labs I remember the smell of almonds was concerning because it can indicate the presence of cyanide, but can also come from many other compounds such as benzaldehyde (from almonds and maybe explosives). Part of the link between taste and smell is that the nose detects volatile compounds but these also enter the mouth where they dissolve in saliva and are also detected by taste buds, along with all sorts of other things. In humans, the brain combines these signals with other things like texture (mouthfeel – such as crunchy or creamy), colour or perception. For example when companies test new flavour recipes they make sure the testers do not know the colours of the samples, because if for instance it looks like strawberry this will influence how you perceive it tastes.

      1. The SAS attached officer didn’t go into crowd attacks, just explosives – general and anti-personnel – and arson devices designed to melt someone’s hand, left in retail places, and torches, and other disguised stuff, and the lovely mercury switches, and that not everything smells. 🙂
        .
        Ah, I remember a revolting taste test by a leading supermarket. I sincerely hope they didn’t put those vile and cheating things out. Still angry about what some of them try to get away with.
        .
        Taste, smell, saliva, our trigger hairs, all designed for a simple world of foraging and staying alive from attacking animals, humans and otherwise. Bristol city council is planning this for Spring next year I hear. 🙂
        .
        Alan

      2. Your comment, Mark, regarding the link between taste and smell where certain smells enter the mouth and dissolve as saliva, reminds me that both cats and dogs (possibly the whole feline and canine world), can be observed using both their nose and open mouth when they come across an interesting smell — usually of another passing animal. For several seconds afterwards, they will keep their mouths open as if savouring the scent for longer, possibly for identification purposes. Maybe humans have lost this faculty, along with the sixth sense.

  10. .
    .

     
    every flavor in the rainbow snow cone stand
    .
    Robin Smith
    .
    .
    Even if I didn’t read into ‘rainbow’ as a just statement for fairness across all genders, and to be honest, across all inferred or institualised differences, that extremists on both wings of politics etc… have used hundreds of years before Hitler and Stalin etc… it’s delightfully sensuousness in flavor. And that’s the point, perhaps, that declaration that we are all flavors, all equal, just different. Hard for some to stomach, but they are the kind of people (bigots to be blunt, but I’ll leave it at that level of bluntness) that I’d leave alone but would never want kids to be near.
    .
    It’s a wonderful haiku, falling into the spectrum of haiku and senryu together, just on one level. But if I read it correctly, or if I don’t, it’s an incredible poem, a mini-Howl but more succinct, and leaving time to do good things, as it’s only six seconds long, plenty of time to be kind to our neighbours. 🙂

    .
    .

    beachside fish fry stall
    a hungry vendor
    sells the last piece
    .
    Srinivasa Rao Sambangi
    .
    .
    This is both lovely as it’s a selfless act, but of concern, as a hardworking human hands over his own meal to provide cash to his family, maybe for medical treatment for all I know. Highly moving, deeply poignant, and a great indirect take on taste, as the taste buds overact in lost anticipation of a meal.
    .
    .
     

    beachside café
    the rotten taste
    of your lies
    .
    Vandana Parashar
    .
    .
    Wow! Lies, whether known instantly or at a later time, leave a mental and emotional bad taste, but also can generate a bad taste sensation in mouth and stomach. Powerful.
    .
    .

     
    summer flavor of the sun sand bass
    .
    Victor Ortiz
    .
    .
    Fun alliteration all the way through! Bass could be the fish including ‘sand bass’, (probably not Courage beer), or a musical instrument that produces a bass sound. Perhaps all three, or at least two of them, on a beach party with House or Trance music! Wow! Poetically masterful, conjuring up taste via alliteration, brilliant, outstanding!
    .
    .
    I am sure we’ve all left out areas of taste, but it’s still a wonderful thematic lunchbox or fish supper of a haiku collection that will be of great benefit to those wishing to expand their senses and topics in haiku.
    .
    .
    Alan
     

    1. Yes, Vandana’s one leapt our at me also. I’d call this an antihaiku because although formally indistinguishable from a haiku it is actually doing the opposite.

      1. Ah, anti, as in alternative? As ‘anti’ doesn’t actually mean ‘against’ as in a negative and destructive manner. More of a Nick Avis haiku perhaps?
        .
        Alan

        1. Well, I think some haiku can try to undermine the reader’s expectations, after drawing them in, as Vandana’s one does. I’ll check out Nick Avis.

          1. Nick Avis, and the Canadian wave of haiku writers, really shook up the complacency that abounded with haiku in topic and approach.
            .
            .
            re:
            .
            beachside café
            the rotten taste
            of your lies
            .
            Vandana Parashar
            .
            .
            It’s unfortunately pretty powerful as many of us will have experienced something unpleasant while on holiday, and at a seaside resort, from a friend, family member, or partner.
            .
            It’s the fact it’s somewhere where you think you have gotten away from the negative aspects of home and work life. It’s the opposite of Shirley Valentine in a way. We expect to get away from problems not have them come to fruition or full reveal in paradise.
            .
            As I’d say this is senryu, which can pull anything it likes from the haiku tradition, it can allude to the holiday season of Summer to slam its case home all the more forcefully.
            .
            It’s well put together, and makes for uncomfortable reading, which a good senryu should, and it’s not an unfair attack on a person known or unknown, but a revelation, and we can commiserate.
            .
            I must ask Susan Burch what she is saying, but I found it very powerful as well, and did lay my own interpretation on it:
            http://sonicboomjournal.wixsite.com/sonicboom/contests
            .
            .
            Mark Gilbert says:
            .
            “…some haiku can try to undermine the reader’s expectations, after drawing them in…”
            .
            .
            That’s a fascinating comment, could you expand a little more on that?
            .
            As haiku draws from senryu, and tanka, more and more, so the other genres do the same, and it brings up some intriguing dynamics, that a plain first stage of Shiki’s suggestion for writing haiku cannot do.
            .
            Alan

          2. I also get a strong metallic taste from Vandana’s verse, as I can remember a few beach resort breaks that didn’t fare well. Our reaching for perfection often falls short, partly as we head into challenging directions, when home is often practical. 🙂

        2. (couldn’t reply to your message so will do so here)
          Yes I agree that Vandana’s is a senryu but that’s not to say it doesn’t belong in this collection. To me hers reads like she was writing a traditional haiku when something happened which upset her but she carried on writing.
          My one from last week was meant to draw the reader in with L1/2 describing an idyllic scene which was undermined by L3 bringing the poem to jolting halt with one syllable, harsh consonants, and most of all a vernacular rather than a traditional haiku word (Vandana’s also uses this last technique). Must stop now – I’m being too verbose (like my haiku from this week).

          1. Mark Gilbert said:
            .
            “Yes I agree that Vandana’s is a senryu but that’s not to say it doesn’t belong in this collection.”
            .
            .
            Oh, yes, I strongly agree, and have long been an advocate of strongly composed senryu on a par with haiku, hence I took up the approach to judge the Sonic Boom journal’s senryu contest, as I can’t judge haiku contests due to conflict of interest.
            .
            .
            Mark Gilbert said:
            .
            “To me hers reads like she was writing a traditional haiku when something happened which upset her but she carried on writing.”
            .
            .
            beachside café
            the rotten taste
            of your lies
            .
            Vandana Parashar
            .
            .
            Intriguing! I just saw a handy setting, whether fact, fictional, or a blend of the two. Holidays at the seaside, be they in our own countries, if not landlocked, or overseas, have always brought both joy and discord. What intrigues me is the question whether the perpetrator is present, at least in the same holiday resort, or left behind etc…
            .
            .
            Mark Gilbert said:
            .
            “My one from last week was meant to draw the reader in with L1/2 describing an idyllic scene which was undermined by L3 bringing the poem to jolting halt with one syllable, harsh consonants, and most of all a vernacular rather than a traditional haiku word (Vandana’s also uses this last technique).”
            .
            .
            secluded beach
            a slew of seaweed
            stinks
            .
            Mark Gilbert (UK)
            https://www.thehaikufoundation.org/2018/07/25/a-sense-of-place-the-shore-smell/
            .
            .
            Then it’s an interesting technique, and used in other media from written stories to filmed ones, and highly effective.
            .
            Alan

  11. I’ve printed it and will spend a delightful afternoon with this delicious read!! Thank you, Kathy

  12. thanks Kathy for this amazing collection of haiku!

    my favourite…east or west, Alan is the best. 😉

    breaking my fast
    the mermaid’s kiss
    of samphire

  13. Dear Kathy, Greetings! so delicious – taste of every haiku here. Appreciating all the talents here.

    Thanks for including mine.
    with regards
    S.Radhamani

  14. Delightful tastes from around the world 🙂 a marvellous read.
    *
    I remember the taste of Alan Summer’s poem it was only a few weeks ago I was nibbling samphire from a cliff edge at Porthcawl.
    *
    breaking my fast
    the mermaid’s kiss
    of samphire
    *
    but I’m sure there’s more to that salty kiss 🙂
    *
    Thank you Kathy for including my verse.

    1. Hi Carol,
      .
      The samphire I had was not 100% fresh, and I had left it a few seconds longer steaming then I should, hence it was literally like kissing a mermaid before her full transformation.
      .
      Alan
      .
      Gosh, Porthcawl, superb nosh! 🙂

      1. I tried freezing some samphire recently – we can sometimes get it from our local fishmonger. I won’t be trying that ever again.

        1. Welsh seaweed for laverbread can be bought as dry wafers and are wonderful, but the structure of samphire works against it I guess.
          .
          Even Russian vodka does successfully freeze, especially if the bottle is 2/3 empty. 🙂

  15. Thank you for including a taste of my haiku here. So many favorites! I particularly was struck by the haiku by Anna Maria Domburg-Sancristoforo, Vishnu Kapoor, Susan Rogers, Lori Zajkowski, Randy Brooks and Will Nixon.

  16. Again, I think it’s difficult to write about taste. A lot of these are about food rather than taste. Others didn’t really try to describe tastes. I loved Alan Summer’s use of metaphor –
    .
    breaking my fast
    the mermaid’s kiss
    of samphire
    .
    and Margaret Walker’s similarly metaphorical
    .
    fresh oyster
    I swallow
    the sea
    .
    as well as Kath Abela Wilson’s
    .
    old salt
    he knows each sea
    by its taste
    .
    Thanks KJ

    1. Thanks Mark, both for selecting mine, and making me into a kigo. 😉
      .
      re:
      “A lot of these are about food rather than taste.”
      .
      Could you expand on that, sounds intriguing.
      .
      re
      .
      fresh oyster
      I swallow
      the sea
      .
      Margaret Walker
      .
      .
      That reminds me of being left alone in Provence for Christmas, and being brave enough to go to a restaurant in the hills, not being able to speak French, and not usually brave to enter foodie places on my own. I had oysters for the first time ever, and forgot I’d been deserted for a couple of hours.
      .
      A long and lonely Christmas in a land I liked but far from home or airport.
      .
      Alan

      1. Forgot to say that I loved Margaret’s haiku, and I was instantly transported to that very first time that was incredible, and has been ever since. 🙂

      2. I just thought I would take this prompt literally and try to write about taste or try to describe taste or write haiku where ‘taste’ was the theme. Others haven’t done that, but if trying to write about taste causes you to write a fantastic haiku about for example riding a bicycle well that’s great, isn’t it?

        To me, your haiku does try – successfully – to describe a taste to someone who perhaps hasn’t experienced it previously (an alien, or someone who can’t smell or who has never visited the coast). Phrases like ‘the smell of the sea’ don’t do this. lt’s not easy. I haven’t really managed it in my submissions.

        1. Mark Gilbert said:
          .
          “I just thought I would take this prompt literally and try to write about taste or try to describe taste or write haiku where ‘taste’ was the theme.”
          .
          .
          Sea of Tranquility
          a mouthful of cotton candy
          dissolves on the tongue
          .
          Mark Gilbert
          .
          .
          Yes, I wanted mine to be ‘taste’ dominated rather than the usual mostly visual that we often default to.
          .
          .
          Mark Gilbert said:
          .
          “Others haven’t done that, but if trying to write about taste causes you to write a fantastic haiku about for example riding a bicycle well that’s great, isn’t it?”
          .
          .
          I think Kathy’s feature will have a great long term effect on how we write and approach haiku. We won’t just do visuals only, but start to introduce more sound, smell, or taste, or combination of two of these.
          .
          .
          Talking about bicycles, I remember when we started to lose some traditional sights, that of the travelling knife-grinder, on a bicycle or small van. And of course those Frenchmen on bicycles selling onions! I thought they had completely disappeared, but then many years later:
          .
          .
          two boys giggle
          as he enters the bike shop …
          the onion seller
          .
          Alan Summers
          First credit: Blithe Spirit vol. 11 no. 3 (2001)
          .
          The Haiku Foundation’s Per Diem: Daily Haiku December 2012 (31 poems): Children
          .
          Anthology credit:
          Stepping Stones:  a way into haiku ed. Martin Lucas (British Haiku Society 2007)
          http://britishhaikusociety.org.uk/shop-2/stepping-stones/
          .
          It was my taste buds that reacted as he was up the hill from me and upwind.
          .
          .
          Mark Gilbert said:
          .
          “To me, your haiku does try – successfully – to describe a taste to someone who perhaps hasn’t experienced it previously (an alien, or someone who can’t smell or who has never visited the coast).”
          .
          .
          breaking my fast
          the mermaid’s kiss
          of samphire
          .
          Alan Summers
          Wiltshire, England
          .
          .
          Alan:
          “Ah, perhaps it’s that Craig Raine’s fault!” 🙂
          He’s been highly influential hasn’t he?
          .
          A Martian Sends a Postcard Home (1979)
          Craig Raine
          http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/a-martian-sends-a-postcard-home/
          .
          .
          Mark Gilbert said:
          .
          “Phrases like ‘the smell of the sea’ don’t do this. lt’s not easy. I haven’t really managed it in my submissions.”
          .
          It’s a good start to put smell, taste, or sound, or touch, in the early draft versions, and then work ‘sidewise’ rocking the haiku draft from side to side until eventually that bit falls out. It isn’t easy, because we have been trained to use those words of ‘tastes, sounds, smells…etc…” as trigger words when we are talking to someone, or a group, or writing about something.
          .
          .
          I had great fun writing about a curry as a poet in a Walled Garden for this anthology:
          “The Sound of Poets Cooking” ed. Richard Krawiec. I must look that recipe up again! 🙂
          .
          .
          Alan

          1. thanks to Alan & Mark, as always, for sharing your comments here – love the discussion, & the links…

  17. I was surprised and pleased that mine was chosen for commenting. Thank-you Kathy !!

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