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A Sense of Place: MEADOW/FIELD – taste

 

 

A Sense of Place

In his essay ‘So:ba’, given at the International Haiku Conference (SUNY Plattsburgh, NY, 2008) and published serially in Frogpond, Jim Kacian discusses the concept of ba:

“If you look up ba in any Japanese-English Dictionary you’ll find it means “place” or “site” or “occasion”. And these are all true in the most general sense—ba is a pointer to a kind of awareness that something of importance is happening in time and space.”

So here we are…

In the following weeks we will get back to haiku basics and explore specific locations with an emphasis on the senses, and with the intention of improving our own haiku practice. Ideally, participants will select an actual location that they can visit, or a location from memory that they have visited in the past. Failing that, we always have our imaginations – and you’re invited to join in the fun! Submit an original unpublished poem (or poems) via our Contact Form by Sunday midnight on the theme of the week, including your name as you would like it to appear, and place of residence. I will select from these for the column, and add commentary.

 

next week’s theme:  MEADOW/FIELD – touch

Our final exploration of the meadows and fields – if possible, the same actual one as in previous weeks – but now we explore the sense of touch… what does it feel like?

I look forward to reading your submissions.

 

A Sense of Place:  MEADOW/FIELD – taste

Each of the following poems takes the meadow or field and the sense of taste in a different direction, and each poet explores without telling the whole story, leaving a gap for the reader to complete. Also, the reader should note that there is, in each of these examples of 3-line poems, a natural break after either the first or second line, and no poem has more than 17 syllables in total…

back from the fields
a taste of someone’s kiss
on his lips

arvinder kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

pumpkin farm
the faces I make
eating greens

C.R. Harper

 

war fields
mother tastes
warm tears

Guliz Mutlu

 

fallow field
the taste of dust
behind a tractor

Marietta McGregor
Australia

 

red clover  nectar with each draw  on my briar

simonj
UK

 

Here are the rest of my selections for this week:

I wonder
how grass tastes
to a dragonfly

Aalix Roake
New Zealand

 

hay harvest
wrapping up
with the falcon’s catch

Adjei Agyei-Baah
Kumasi, Ghana

 

taste its scratches blackberries

Adrian Bouter

 

a tired farmer…
in his tractor’s shade
he savors his lunch

Al Gallia
Lafayette, Louisiana USA

 

unmowed meadow
sucking the sweetness
from a spear of grass

Amy Losak

 

Earl Grey tea
my mouth
becomes a meadow

Andy McLellan

 

picnic on the lawn –
licking his fingers
of parmigiana*

(*the parmigiana is a dish made with aubergines, mozzarella and prosciutto and I do it every time my daughter returns from university)

Angela Giordano

 

full taste
of field herbs –
green bug

Angiola Inglese

 

smoke spice
on my tongue
autumn fields

Ann K. Schwader
Westminster, CO

 

summer field –
tasting the warmth
on  your smile

Anna Maria Domburg-Sancristoforo

 

meadowsweet*
the taste of pain relief
on my tongue

(* one of several plants that contain salicylates and were used in the past to relieve pain – they taste a bit like aspirin too!)

Barbara Kaufmann

 

morning turnout
the colts nibble
sweet meadow grass

Barbara Tate
Winchester, TN

 

field walk
a butterfly’s tour
of scented flowers

Blessed Ayeyame
Ughelli, Nigeria

 

autumn field –
sparrows look
for leftovers

Bob Whitmire
Round Pond, Maine

 

goat cheese
a slice
of the meadow

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

 

big bang mother’s jugged hare

(My apologies to vegetarians and vegans, no offence intended.)

Carol Jones
Wales

 

a taste of morning
on my tongue
undulating meadows

Celestine Nudanu

 

field of ripe wheat
trying to remember
the taste of bread

cezar ciobika

 

on the battlefield
copper taste of fear
before rounds fly

Charles Harmon
Los Angeles, California, USA

 

mushroom plumes
the taste putrid
ash

(The eruption of Mount Soputan 3rd October 2018, on the island of Sulawesi could possibly be accelerated by the 7.5 magnitude tremor)

Christina Chin
Kuching, Malaysia

 

the taste of dew
on our parched tongues
deep meadow

Christina Sng

 

bright yellow flowers
tasting squash blossom soup
for the first time

Claire Vogel Camargo

 

enticing
the mouths of bees
morning glories open

Craig Kittner
Wilmington, NC

 

a field destroyed by fire
bad taste
in the mouth

Danijela Grbelja
Croatia, Sibenik

 

in the open field
wintering horses
lick my bare hands

David Gale
Gloucester, UK

 

scorching heat
in the meadow
taste of smoke

Debbi Antebi
London, UK

 

no bitterness
in their hearts
artichoke field

Deborah P Kolodji
Temple City, California

 

chicken adobo
yaya* fetches lemongrass
in from the fields

(*Philippines – referring usually to a young live-in female who helps in the house)

Devin Harrison

 

I wonder
which flower do bees
like the most

Dubravka Šcukanec
Zagreb, Croatia

 

lying on the meadow
wild strawberries taste
on your lips

Elisa Allo
Zug, Switzerland

 

meadow orchards
the sweetness
of a stolen kiss

Eva Limbach

 

this dry summer –
settling over the meadows
the taste of smoke

Gary Evans
Stanwood, Washington

 

abandoned field –
the taste of  persimmon
you gathered for me

Giovanna Restuccia
Italy

 

once in Paris
lavender
gelato

Greer Woodward
Kamuela, HI

 

left fielder jeered tasting her fear

Helen Buckingham

 

dairy farm
the taste of fresh hay
in the milk

Hifsa Ashraf
Pakistan

 

fairy rings –
a feast of horse mushrooms
in the paddock

Ingrid Baluchi

 

cows
for the first time outside
grass butter

Joanne van Helvoort

 

our tongues touch
in the meadow
a shooting star

John S Green
Bellingham, WA

 

cider afternoon
between cloud buffeted dreams
the taste of her breath

John Hawkhead

 

mayo on rye
a swig of switchel
field hand’s lunch

Judith Hishikawa
West Burke, VT

 

field gone to blackberries…
the sweetness
of his purple lips

Judt Shrode
Washington State

 

a blade of grass
between my thumbs
the taste of green

Kath Abela Wilson
Pasadena, California

 

winter deepens
the last of the lavender honey
in my tea

Kimberly Esser
Los Angeles, CA

 

tasting its catch
the spider
adds a pinch of silk

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

spring grasses
breastfeeding in the meadow

Lori Zajkowski

 

atop my green salad
the meadow’s bright petals
too pretty to taste

Lorraine Schein

 

tiny bees…
the unknown taste
of wild flowers

minuscole api… il gusto sconosciuto /di fiori d’erba

Lucia Cardillo

 

swallowing
the sweet with the sour
blackberry picking

Lucy Whitehead
Essex, UK

 

meadow honey
drips from broken combs
– grandpa’s toothy laugh

m. shane pruett

 

fleeing Fido…
chased by the magpie
tastes his own medicine

Madhuri Pillai

 

Miner’s Lettuce
I always taste it
then wonder why

Marcyn Del Clements
Claremont, California

 

moonshine
still
a cash crop

Margaret Walker

 

grass whistles –
the sweet-bitter sap
of childhood

Margherita Petriccione

 

worker bee’s collection
– tastes of meadow

Margo Williams
Stayton, Oregon

 

stubble field
the farmhand laps blood
from a splinter

Mark Gilbert
UK

 

In the Fall, sun-soaked
fruit orchards create red hues
and delicious tastes.

Mark Rosenholz

 

blackberry seeds
the taste
of regrets

Martha Magenta
England, UK

 

dandelion soup
mother talks
of the old days

Mary Hanrahan

 

Field –
I don’t dare
taste the mushrooms

michael ceraolo
South Euclid, Ohio

 

wild mustard
half a meadow in
every bottle

Michael Henry Lee

 

meadow concert –
the taste of a new reed
on his clarinet

Michael H. Lester
Los Angeles CA USA

 

class field trip
a lad describes the taste
of sheep sorrel

Michael Smeer
Haarlemmermeer, The Netherlands

 

wild mustangs
the wind with its taste
of somewhere else

Michele L. Harvey

 

red clover
children, too,
sucking nectar

Mike Gallagher
Achill Island, Ireland

 

Autumn leaves –
in my morning coffee
maple syrup

Monica Federico

 

hedgerow rings
the meadow
she eats the wild grapes

nancy brady
huron, ohio, usa

 

harvested fields…
sharing my tasteless lunch
with uncaring crows

Natalia Kuznetsova
Russia

 

breeze –
smiling the  spouses
gather bitter chicory

Nazarena Rampini
Italy

 

overripe blackberries
and bitter seeds
the meadow’s end

Nicole Tilde
Shady Dale, Ga.

 

the flavors
of summer meadow herbs
cheeseboard

Olivier Schopfer
Geneva, Switzerland

 

field greens
the free tasting line
starts to grow

Pat Davis
Pembroke, NH  USA

 

paddock barbeque –
trying not to remember
the lamb

Pauline O’Carolan
Cobargo, NSW, Australia

 

a plum tree spreads
into the meadow
and onto my biscuit

Philip Whitley
SC, USA

 

every
mosquito
female
after
my
blood

Polona Oblak
Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

overgrown meadow
swarming honeybees drink
the last of summer

Pris Campbell

 

strawberry fields
summer sweetens
my smile

Rachel Sutcliffe

 

field  tamarind
taste of pickles –
by grandma

Radhamani sarma
Chennai, India

 

lavender fields
the sweetish taste of
my tranquilizers

Radostina Dragostinova

 

combines in the wheat
grandpa splits a handful
of grains to chew

Randy Brooks

 

sweat
even on the tongue
hiking desert field

Rehn Kovacic

 

the taste of earth –
berries falling away
from the vine

Réka Nyitrai

 

cow field –
a mama nurses
her calf

Roberta Beary
County Mayo, Ireland

 

southern plantation –
bittersweet lemonade
in a mason jar

robyn brooks
usa

 

Halloween harvest
the taste of pumpkin
on every treat

Ron C. Moss
Tasmania, Australia

 

first frost
morning coffee seasoned
with pumpkin smile

ron scully

 

nature center
tasting this field
in a granola bar

(The Cincinnati Nature Center is in Milford, Ohio.)

Ronald K. Craig
Batavia, OH  USA

 

picnic –
the flowers of borage
in the salad

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

the memory of grandmother
cinnamon in apple pie

Il ricordo di nonna –
la cannella nella torta di mele

Rosaria Lo Bono

 

walking the dog
a bit of meadow
between his teeth

Sanjuktaa Asopa

 

field picnic
the sputtering taste of a gnat
that flew into my mouth

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

strawberry field
remained on the lips
the taste of childhood

Serhiy Shpychenko
Kyiv, UA

 

restless children
playing in the meadow –
fresh milk around the mouth

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

wildflower field
the taste of one kiss
then another

Stephen A. Peters

 

I reach out to him
with his favorite apple
golden like his mane

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, CA, USA

 

last bite of pie
I wipe clean
the sunflowers

Tia Haynes
Lakewood, Ohio

 

fieldside blackberries
stained hands and lips
alas pieless

Tim Heaney
Atlanta, Ga.

 

strawberry –
the taste of summer
and wild fields

Tsanka Shishkova

 

meadow stroll –
an unguarded picnic
attended by birds

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio   USA

 

field trip
…the lingering taste
of that stolen kiss

Vandana Parashar

 

mustard fields –
relishing last pieces of
pickled mangoes

Vani Sathyanarayan

 

green meadow
some leftovers
from one’s picnic

Vessislava Savova

 

winter drops a hint
in the air over meadow
early taste of snow

Vishnu Kapoor

 

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada and an Associate Member of the League of Canadian Poets. She recently co-edited an anthology of crime-themed haiku called Body of Evidence: a collection of killer ’ku.

 

This Post Has 85 Comments

  1. Including humour in haiku is very difficult, because if it’s overdone it shifts into comic verse, perhaps even side-stepping senryu as well.
    .
    As a co-founder of a now long defunct online publication called “Haijinx- humor in haiku” which was groundbreaking for its time, I’ve often admired how humour is slotted into haiku without dissolving the ‘haiku’ into something very different.
    .
    Here are two superb but very different approaches to humor in haiku:
    .
    .

    meadow stroll –
    an unguarded picnic
    attended by birds
    .
    Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
    Fairlawn, Ohio USA
    .
    .
    The verb ‘attended’ really makes this haiku, and is helped by the second line adjective ‘unguarded’. They both work in co-operation without pushing the haiku feel out of the poem. It’s wry humor on more than one level, and the word choices are simply terrific!
    .
    .

    lavender fields
    the sweetish taste of
    my tranquilizers
    .
    Radostina Dragostinova
    .
    .
    Senryu are superb verses when done well and not overplayed. I’d still happily call this haiku (or senryu) as the nature reference is two-fold. Two-fold? Well the opening line is definitely and clearly nature. 🙂
    .
    But so is the phrase, because many medicines are derived from nature itself!
    .
    EXTRACT:
    .
    Major Tranquilizers
    .
    “The first major tranquilizer was developed from Rauwolfia serpentina, also known as the Indian snakeroot. Rauwolfia is known for its ability to lower blood pressure. Used for many years in India for the treatment of serious mental illness, it was frequently referred to there as the “insanity herb.” Most often, its roots were crushed and consumed in a tea. In 1943 an Indian physician named Rustom Jal Vakil (1911–1974) wrote about the plant’s success in treating mental illness. It wasn’t long before Western doctors began studying Rauwolfia, hoping that it could help patients with severe psychiatric disorders.”
    .
    “American doctor Robert Wallace Wilkins (1906–2003) of Boston University Medical School conducted extensive research on Rauwolfia serpentina after hearing about its use in India. In 1954, he showed that reserpine, an alkaloid and the active ingredient in Rauwolfia, was successful in treating both high blood pressure and severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and other psychoses. Almost immediately the new drug (sold under the brand name Serpasil) became the most popular way to treat such disorders.”
    .
    Tranquilizer | Encyclopedia.com
    https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/drugs/pharmacology/tranquilizer
    .
    The humour in this haiku, packed with nature, is also complex.
    “Never judge a haiku by its surface words.” Alan Summers, October 2018

    1. Hi Alan,
      This comment comes probably too late for you to catch, but it is worth a try.
      I’m very interested to know how to incorporate humour in haiku, and wonder if you can advise me where to find out more about this? I admire George Swede’s type of humour, which, I imagine, is not ‘overdone’, and also John Dunphy’s. I’m concerned that several of my own published attempts at humour may fall into the realm of comic verse, so I need to know the difference, beyond, of course, the demands of more traditional ku.
      .
      I also find that there is a very subtle difference between humour and pathos. The following, which found its way into Failed Haiku, Issue 22, was misunderstood as humorous by some when I had intended it as something rather more poignant:
      .
      pet store hamster
      on his wheel again…
      where to today?
      .
      Looking forward to this afternoon’s new selection from Kathy’s wonderful A Sense of Place, and all your useful comments that follow.
      .
      Ingrid (Macedonia)

      1. Hi Ingrid,
        .
        As co-founder of Call of the Page, with Karen Hoy, we are actually half way through a course that involves humour: https://www.callofthepage.org/learning/haiku-courses/the-spectrum-of-haiku-senryu/
        .
        I also regularly work with people with haibun where humour is part of even very dark subject matter. We need humour in our lives, yet it need not be full in the face humour all the time.
        .
        Sadly the very journal I helped co-found is unavailable to access, and contained many essays and articles, and haiku after haiku with all types of humour.
        .
        .
        Ingrid said:
        “I’m concerned that several of my own published attempts at humour may fall into the realm of comic verse, so I need to know the difference, beyond, of course, the demands of more traditional ku.”
        .
        Please do not be hard on yourself!
        .
        This is delightful, by the way!
        .
        .

        fairy rings –
        a feast of horse mushrooms
        in the paddock
        .
        Ingrid Baluchi
        .
        .
        I don’t know what traditional ku might mean, and regards haiku, it was brought into being in the 1890s, and has proved itself to be very much a genre, ever evolving.
        .
        .
        Ingrid said:
        “I also find that there is a very subtle difference between humour and pathos. The following, which found its way into Failed Haiku, Issue 22, was misunderstood as humorous by some when I had intended it as something rather more poignant:”
        .
        pet store hamster
        on his wheel again…
        where to today?
        .
        Ingrid Baluchi
        .
        .
        Unfortunately I don’t feel the range of humour is well understood. We suffer from QJS (Quick Joke Syndrome) all too often. The magazine “Failed Haiku” are very fortunate to have this submitted to them.
        .
        It’s well constructed and I feel sad that we imprison our fellow animal species when no crime has been committed, just for our own pleasure. We also regularly and knowingly wrongfully imprison humans as well. The hamster has no rights or recognition and vulnerable to the whims of shopkeepers and customers. I do love where hamsters are found homes where they have extensive play areas. And too often humans are denied decent freedoms and we still endorse wide varieties of slavery.
        .
        Okay, not every reader need to read deeply, but I would hope some readers could find at least some sympathy with a vulnerable creature that is bought and sold.
        .
        I would be interested if you created a haibun response around all of this.

        1. thanks Alan & Ingrid – this is the kind of commentary & discussion that I am hoping will continue & flourish on this blog page…

  2. Hello,
    (Laugh) I worked hard on this one as I had to translate an old memory of a biking trip in Belgium/France, when I sat on a giant hay wheel at the end of one long biking day, when the light was coming down. The beautiful golden glow of the end of the day, magical, reflecting on the beauty- not the one seen, painted, in acclaimed museums in Paris, but the raw beauty of nature and glow on a golden field in the French countryside. I could have stayed there forever, perched on my giant wheel of hay, “traveling” in my mind, was I not reminded of the present moment by the prickly hay on my naked calves. So, sorry, submitting a little over the deadline as I had to sleep on it (and as I couldn’t really sleep… here’s my humble try at Field/ Touch):

    dreams rolling
    prickly hay wheel
    under my cycling shorts

    Sandra St-Laurent (Yukon)

  3. I absolutely love the Sense of Place series, and the challenges it presents for me (us?). I’ve worked in small, novice writing groups a few times and been challenged to “open up my senses” in describing the world, but never have I been as effectively challenged and inspired in that endeavor as here. So many thanks to Kathy Munro for including me, and for occasionally “helping” me decide which to present. The additional commentaries of Alan and others are incredibly educational for those of us yearning to write better, or more evocative poetry. Thanks to all.

    1. thanks so much sharing this – it is wonderful to hear… I have learned so much from this project, & as I have said before, I couldn’t do it without the submissions of poems from all of you… so thank you!

  4. Dear poets
    I enjoyed reading all those splendid haiku
    built around meadows; my warmest Greetings to you all

    =vasavan

    here is my haiku

    war-torn city
    from inside a ruined house
    cries of shamed women

    =vasavan

  5. thank you, Kathy, I may not say this every week but i do appreciate the effort that goes into making our weekly fix of haiku.
    i’m also extending my thanks to the friendly community of poets gathered in this place.

  6. What a wonderful workshop in progress! The community building here is a unique mix, including some fellow speculative fiction poets.

    Thank you in particular for the expert commentary from kjmunro and Alan Summers.

  7. Hello everyone. Good to be with you again. Thank you kj.

    Loving all the bee references. My personal favorite this time around:

    overgrown meadow
    swarming honeybees drink
    the last of summer

    Pris Campbell

    I’m up in Asheville, North Carolina for a couple of days. Going to run out in the sunshine that just broke through and touch some hay bales. See what comes up.

    Ta!

  8. Dear esteemed poet,
    Warm greetings! Regarding Bees, especially honey bee collection,
    I always used to wonder, how such small in size and stature can collect honey, I mean the
    later effects of collecting and storing -isn’t it a miracle which is God’s special way of
    creative aura. Sweet storage, we humans in general tend to overlook this aspect.
    Wonderful haiku related to honey bees.
    with regards
    S.Radhamani

    1. Dear S.Radhamani,
      .
      There are indeed a lot of “small engines” that benefit the planet, and clear up as best they can after human debris. The humble fly is one such wonder. If flies disappeared in one day, humans would die off in weeks!
      .
      We hunt insects down, as bees are under attack by governments and corporates, which is outrageous as they have more claim on the planet than the humans.
      .
      Certainly a lot of respect should be given to all insects, whose invisible work also benefits us.
      .
      I bought Karen several books on bees, as we are trying to both recognise each type, as well as create a welcome environment.
      .
      Here’s a haiku before I could learn to distinguish them:
      .
      .
      on her fingers
      the smell of applemint-
      two bees collide
      .
      Alan Summers
      Snapshots Four (1998)

      1. Dear esteemed poet,
        Warm greetings! Beneath the reputed haiku/senryu related poet,a keen bird watcher, friend and environmentalist ,coming out to give us excellent haiku poems ;often his concern/care/ for the insects – perceived here.
        Kindly convey my regards to Karen.
        with regards
        S.Radhamani

    1. walking the dog
      a bit of meadow
      between his teeth
      .
      Sanjuktaa Asopa
      .
      .
      Great haiku! Love those last two lines, and ‘a bit of meadow’ followed by ‘between his teeth’ is priceless and yet so accurately observed.
      .
      As you’ll know, Karen had a dog and meadow poem too! 🙂
      .
      a new month –
      different seeds
      on the spaniel’s ears
      .
      Karen Hoy
      naad anunaad: an anthology of contemporary international haiku
      ed. Shloka Shankar, Sanjuktaa Asopa, Kala Ramesh
      ISBN-10: 9385665332 ISBN-13: 978-9385665332 (India, 2016)

      1. Thank you so much for your commentary, Alan! So glad you liked my poem.

        Yes, I remember this poem by Karen now.

        a new month –
        different seeds
        on the spaniel’s ears

        A wonderful one!

  9. .
    Autobiographical?
    .
    .
    class field trip
    a lad describes the taste
    of sheep sorrel

    Michael Smeer
    Haarlemmermeer, The Netherlands
    .
    .
    Some youngsters might only know to eat things from supermarkets, while more enterprising ones will know food can be found outside.
    .
    Sheep Sorrel (Rumex Acetosella) is a popular nibble with children and is familiar to most trampers as a practical thirst-quencher.
    http://blog.emergencyoutdoors.com/edible-wild-plants-sheep-sorrel-rumex-acetosella/
    .
    I was intrigued by the use of ‘lad’ which suggests the author is the boy in question. A hidden clue perhaps.
    .
    At a time of uncertainly it would certainly be logical to know where and how to eat food in the wild. Some Scandinavian schools encourage interaction and knowledge of the ‘outdoors’ which makes for a more grounded (no pun intended) individual.

    1. Yes, this is autobigraphical. It was an early school trip at the end of the school year, I must have been 11 or 12, that I/we discovered sheep sorrel. A thirst quenching tangy juicy stalk of a plant with medical applications going back to the stone age. The class trip took us to some wooded or sanddune area and we took hikes with the whole class through the surroundings. The lad in question was a local farmer’s son who was chewing the sorrel and explained the taste and some of the history to us schoolboys. In more recent and alternative medicine the power of this plant is even ‘tested’ in medicine toward the treatment of cancer.

      Thanks for your comments and analysis, Alan. It’s always a pleasure to read them and I feel honored that my poem warrented your attention.

      1. Ah, lad is probably a good term for a youngster on a farm.
        .
        City kids meeting farm people is invaluable and there is so much to learn that is different. All good for the brain. It’s not completely an urban myth that children only know milk comes from a supermarket, not a farm, not a cow.
        .
        Glad your school trip went okay. I still remember this incident:

        .
        winter timetable-
        the late train leaves behind
        half a school trip
        .
        Alan Summers
        Blithe Spirit vol 17 no. 1 (2007)

        1. Haha! Yes, kids fooling around on the platform and then some end up missing the train. Very recognizable! I trust you managed to meet up with the next train 😀

          1. Actually the children and teachers were behaving, it was the train management’s fault. I was just a punter waiting for the train as well, at my then home in Bradford on Avon. The trains are often just 2 or 3 carriages, and often not big cars.
            .
            The teachers sensibly organised a meet up, but it was embarrassing that they were messed about by grown adults at the train management offices, who are always messing with the onboard train staff.

          1. Farm hand would have suggested a young adult, whereas lad could anything from pre to young teen son of a farmer. It is an old term for youngsters but perhaps in keeping with the old practices of independent farms.

  10. This was truly my most difficult one to write~ I am thankful you chose one to publish again KJ! Thank you so much. What incredible company to be among. After reading many (with many more to read) I have wonderful imagery filled with many different flavors. Thank you all.

    1. Karen and myself love bees! We have mostly Buff-tailed bees and they took over a small bird box this new so that was novel! There are all sorts of bees, we even have Solitary Bees, and Tree Bees.
      .
      worker bee’s collection
      – tastes of meadow
      .
      Margo Williams
      Stayton, Oregon
      .
      Wonderful! Do you know which ones? You have 500 species of bees in Oregon, wow! So you live near Salem, but not the famous/infamous one of course. 😉
      .
      Here’s a great guide from Oregon Department of Agriculture
      https://www.oregon.gov/ODA/shared/Documents/Publications/IPPM/ODABeeGuide.pdf

      1. Alan I live east of Salem 14 miles on roughly 24 acres. We have several species of bees some that are aggressive in nature and some difficult to identify. This haiku was referring to the honey bees I watch who forage for food to make delightful honey. Now I unfamiliar with species of honey bees if there are more than one so I thank you for the resource. My sister and brother in law own The UrbanBee Co. out of Burien Seattle and the taste of their raw honey is amazing!!

        1. Hi Margo!
          .
          The Urban Bee Company:
          https://www.urbanbee.com/about/
          .
          Cool, AMY BARANSKI • Co-Founder! Great to see that name again. So Amy and her team do field trips etc…
          .
          Ah, yes, honey or any other product pre-factory packaging is great. I still remember drinking free fountain water for visitors and residents in a famous English village that tasted like Champagne, yet once bottled lost all of its magic.
          .
          I didn’t know bees were particularly aggressive, only some wasps, and hornets. Our bees have a lot of patience for me standing accidentally in their way back to the bird box! 🙂

          1. Yes Amy Baranski! My younger sister. She and her husband Bob Redmond have partnered with THEO Chocolates in Seattle using their honey in their mix. Try it sometime! Most of our honey bees are docile and allow me to watch nearby. Thanks a ton for the commentary!

            M

    2. thanks so much for submitting, Margo – & wonderful to learn that you are also a Baranski! Thanks to Alan for drawing out these sweet details…

  11. Congrats to every poet – another fine selection. I would like to call attention to Debbi Antebbi’s poem:
    scorching heat
    in the meadow
    taste of smoke
    The neat thing about it is that it can be read with the break after Line 1 -or- with the break after Line 2!

  12. Pickled mangoes, wild strawberries, meadow herbs – what a feast! My favorite, Laurie Greer’s:
    .
    tasting its catch
    the spider adds
    a pinch of silk
    .
    delectable!
    .
    Thank you Kathy for including mine in this wonderful mix

    1. Ingrid–
      So pleased you like it! this means a lot to me.
      Thanks,
      Laurie
      though now I think it would be better as:

      spider
      tastes its catch
      adds a pinch of silk

      ….they are never done. Nor even ever abandoned.

      1. Dear Laurie Greer
        .
        re:
        .
        .

        tasting its catch
        the spider
        adds a pinch of silk
        .
        Laurie Greer
        Washington, DC
        .
        or as Ingrid Baluchi revised it:
        .
        .
        tasting its catch
        the spider adds
        a pinch of silk
        .
        .
        Both of those versions are superior to:
        .
        spider
        tastes its catch
        adds a pinch of silk
        .
        The syntax and order of lines is far superior in your original or Ingrid’s version.
        .
        Ingrid’s revision deftly retouches the order of words but don’t make any more changes, it’s brilliantly conceived with that pun and misreading – I read salt at first. 🙂
        .
        It’s great! 🙂

        1. Far too new at this genre to presume revising anyone’s ku, least of all yours, Laurie! I simply didn’t copy it out properly into the comments, so ‘the spider adds’ in the second line was my mistake. Besides, by inadvertently altering it, each of the three lines consists of four syllables…tut…tut. However, I’m glad this came about because through Alan’s comments, (thank you!) I learned more about syntax in all three versions and the consequent importance of the sound of a poem.

          1. thank you Ingrid, Laurie & Alan – this is the kind of exchange I am hoping to cultivate with this column… we can all learn so much by sharing – & we all make mistakes too! I read ‘salt’ the first time through as well – wonderful!

  13. Dear Kathy,
    Greetings! Lovely to see all the lovely,delicious ‘tastes’ Thanks to see mine here. The following by Sanjuktaa Asopa captures me , my special attention.

    walking the dog
    a bit of meadow
    between his teeth

    Sanjuktaa Asopa

  14. So many wonderful tastes of the meadow/field.
    .
    picnic—
    the flowers of borage
    in the salad
    .
    Rosa Maria Di Salvatore.

    A very beautiful visual, also, that bright blue star shaped flower, gorgeous. The herb of gladness and courage.
    According to Pliny, Borage was the nepenthe of Homer, a herb wine that brought absolute forgetfulness.
    I certainly don’t need any of that 🙂
    .
    Many thanks for including mine, Kathy.
    .
    I found the sight of the birds on the diving board quite humorous. A great day 🙂

    1. Hi Carol,
      There are some great photos of that diving board on the internet, but I feel the birds deserve to have it as a home now. 🙂
      .
      big bang mother’s jugged hare
      .

      Carol Jones
      Wales
      .
      I’ve only had jugged hare once, at a venue in Bristol, and I was the only one not sick! Never had it since. Love the monoku though!

      1. 🙂 🙂
        You have a hearty constitution, Alan.
        .
        I am an advocate of wild life protection, and farming policies, as far as I’m concerned, are going in the right direction. Big changes are on the horizon 🙂

        1. Yes, just caught on the radio we should only have meat once a week. Takes me back to the 1960s when it was a luxury to have a joint, or chicken dinner! Also it is odd that we eat our fellow animal species. I’m sure we’d be upset if it was us being eaten by the neighbours. 🙂

          1. Yes, a luxury indeed, and if the cost of producing food keeps spiralling upwards, along with the extreme changes within our seasons, it will be a ‘once a week’ luxury, once again.
            As a nation we have great concern when it comes to meat production. We have the highest standards here in the UK, if the time ever comes that we have to rely on cheaper imports, from around the world -and we all look at the price before purchase – I will become a vegetarian.

    1. Your haiku reminded me that the restaurant my father ran and then sold was renamed as Parmigiana. Sadly it was not successful as my father’s restaurant named after Isambard Brunel Kingdom.
      .
      .

      picnic on the lawn –
      licking his fingers
      of parmigiana*
      .
      (*the parmigiana is a dish made with aubergines, mozzarella and prosciutto and I do it every time my daughter returns from university)
      .
      Angela Giordano
      .
      It’s a great Italian dish when done well, so I recommend following a recipe, and following through either in a field or at home. 🙂

  15. Thanks, Kathy! It’s so wonderful to read all the wonderful selection of haiku on Wednesday mornings. I appreciate being included!

    1. Love this!
      .
      .
      dandelion soup
      mother talks
      of the old days
      .
      Mary Hanrahan
      .
      .
      And no need to spell out taste. Anyone who hasn’t had a dandelion concoction of one kind or another I am sure there are lots of recipes online. A good cheap/free way to have something with bite and nutrition. 🙂

  16. Thanks to Kathy Munro for her work with these series of prompts! I look forward to the challenge each week. (The “taste” of a field was a difficult one! )

      1. Thank you Alan, John and Gary. ! I missed these comments last week or would have responded earlier! I appreciate your feedback and kind words – and am happy it brought a smile, Gary.

  17. I shall look forward to reading all the poems once I’ve completed my commentaries on a course. How does a meadow or field taste? An intriguing challenge!
    .
    Alas I ran out of time as I was literally running a ginko, with Karen, across a meadow, and onto a big lake with a huge diving platform for humans now taken over by birds, quite rightly so! 🙂

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