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A Sense of Place: HIKING TRAIL – taste

 

 

A Sense of Place

In his essay ‘So:ba’, given at the International Haiku Conference (SUNY Plattsburgh, NY, 2008) and published serially in Frogpond, Jim Kacian discusses the concept of ba:

“If you look up ba in any Japanese-English Dictionary you’ll find it means “place” or “site” or “occasion”. And these are all true in the most general sense—ba is a pointer to a kind of awareness that something of importance is happening in time and space.”

So here we are…

In the following weeks we will get back to haiku basics and explore specific locations with an emphasis on the senses, and with the intention of improving our own haiku practice. Ideally, participants will select an actual location that they can visit, or a location from memory that they have visited in the past. Failing that, we always have our imaginations – and you’re invited to join in the fun! Submit an original unpublished poem (or poems) via our Contact Form by Sunday midnight on the theme of the week, including your name as you would like it to appear, and place of residence. I will select from these for the column, and add commentary.

 

next week’s theme:  HIKING TRAIL – touch

Our final exploration of the hiking trail – if possible, the same actual one as in previous weeks – but now we explore the sense of touch… what does it feel like? The deadline for this theme is midnight Pacific Time, Sunday 18 November 2018.

I look forward to reading your submissions.

 

A Sense of Place:  HIKING TRAIL – taste

I appreciate all the comments, kind words, and suggestions so far – thank you! And for those of you who are curtailing the number of poems in your submissions, I think this can be a valuable exercise in reviewing one’s own work to try to see it through the potential editor’s eyes… however, the two aspects of this project that are the most enjoyable to me are reading the poems and the discussions about them… so please don’t limit yourself in your submissions unless you want to, and please keep all this in mind when we roll out the new ‘improved’ version of the column in 2019! To be clear, it is not the number of poems in the submissions, it is the time spent on both communication and compiling such a huge column that will be addressed in the new format next year. We’ll see how it works!
A note on the culture of the blog comments section:  we count on all participants to be kind and encouraging in their comments… the column is not meant to be a competition, rather, let’s make it a place for friendly discussion, where we can all share and learn from each other…

Blackberries
Suddenly taste of bananas…
Hiking in my dream

Anna Victoria Goluba

Who has not had such a dream experience?

 

trailside pause
the taste of berries
on your lips

Gary Evans
Stanwood, Washington

I have read similar poems to this one, either in previous columns, submissions, or elsewhere, (including the next poem), and yet there is a simple elegance here – a natural, non-judgmental truth that can be read in different ways…

 

nel sottobosco le fragoline:
piccoli baci lungo il sentiero

in the undergrowth the strawberries:
little kisses along the path

Giuliana Ravaglia

And here is another take on the same scenario that can lead the reader in other directions…

 

sandwiched
between high dry walls
desert watercress

m. shane pruett

This is an example of how haiku can help express the many double-meanings of the English language… a careful choice of words can efficiently bring many levels of meaning to the poem…

 

path through the orchard
the sweetness of summer
in the windfall’s flesh

Rachel Sutcliffe

What a delicious snapshot of autumn – again, this is a poem with many details missing, and this allows the reader to tailor their own vision of the poem…

 

Here are the rest of my selections for this week:

hiking kiss the mints in her sack

Adrian Bouter

 

earthy taste
of campfire smoke
her eyes meet his

Al Gallia
Lafayette, Louisiana USA

 

Bush damper –
a tingle of big sky coffee
in the horse riders

(Note: damper is Australian Bush Bread which is soda bread buried in the earth overnight.)

Alan Summers
Queensland, Australia

 

childhood outing –
on the hands the taste
of wild strawberries

Angela Giordano

 

trip to the lighthouse –
flavor of salt
on your lips

Angiola Inglese

 

ancestral dust
fresh on my tongue
Chaco trail

Ann K. Schwader
Westminster, CO

 

along the way
back in my mother’s kitchen –
salami sandwich

Anna Maria Domburg-Sancristoforo

 

vineyard trail
strawberries
stain their lips

Anthony Rabang

 

picnic in the hills –
a taste of his mother’s pickle
in the kiss

arvinder kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

settler’s plank road
coated with frost
cranberries less tart

Astrid Egger

 

trail-side rest
a kaibab squirrel shares my
peanut butter sandwich

Barbara Tate
Winchester, TN

 

smoky taste
of the forest
heartbeats away

Bill Pauly

 

stopping
to taste the air
a snake and i

Billy Antonio
Laoac, Philippines

 

blister on my heel
two miles to go…
eat the pain

Bob Whitmire
Round Pond, Maine

 

one glass of red wine
a trip back
to the vineyard trail

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

 

trail mix…
keeping company
salty

C.R. Harper

 

hike in low light
remnants of a spiderweb
across my mouth

Carol Dilworth

 

tasting victory
exhausted climbers crawling
Everest summit

Charles Harmon
Los Angeles, California, USA

 

sun’s buttery flavor
sits on my tongue
defying snowdrops

Christina Pecoraro

 

the taste
of freedom
solo hike

Christina Sng

 

gem lake trail
mom’s cold beef patty…
heavenly

Claire Vogel Camargo

 

breathtaking view
the taste of coffee
in clouds

Danijela Grbelja
Sibenik, Croatia

 

lightweight hike
the persistent taste
of the plastic cup

David Gale
Gloucester, UK

 

anniversary hike
the green M&Ms
in our trail mix

Deborah P Kolodji
Temple City, California

 

during the ascent
drinking from a mountain stream
living waters

Devin Harrison
Vancouver Island, Canada

 

snack break
perspiration salts
our trail mix

dianne moritz

 

step by step
the lips all black
from blackberry

Dubravka Šcukanec
Zagreb, Croatia

 

Indian Summer
I walk through the woods
munching chestnuts

Elisa Allo
Zug, Switzerland

 

hiking trail
the frozen taste of rain
on our lips

Eufemia Griffo

 

desert hike
the last drop of water
mixed with sand

Fractled
USA

 

trail mix hiking
the taste of raisins
between my teeth

Gary Hittmeyer
Shokan, NY

 

a line
of black ants
hiking the pantry

Greer Woodward
Waimea, Hawaii

 

homecoming
the aftertaste
of hiking

Guliz Mutlu

 

Margalla hills
exotic mulberries
delaying the hike

Hifsa Ashraf
Pakistan

 

trail break at a nomad camp –
sweet tea
sipped between laughter

Ingrid Baluchi
Macedonia

 

gourmet hike
stream water wine
with truffles and gorp

Jackie Maugh Robinson

 

hot s’mores
at trail end
sweet melts in snow

(S’mores are campfire treats: roasted marshmallow on chocolate between graham crackers.)

janice munro
Canada

 

Wild blueberries –
the taste of your lips
in mine

Julia Guzmán

 

Tibetan tea
the taste of quiet
at the top of the world

Kath Abela Wilson
(still traveling in China)
Pasadena, California

 

aged gouda lingers
after snack break
on desert trail

Kathleen Mazurowski

 

trail’s end
a hint of rust
in the water

Kelly Sauvage Angel
Madison, WI

 

Hiking to our spot
His kiss still tastes
Of cigarettes

Kimberly Spring
Lakewood, Ohio

 

Shenandoah Trail
day moon…
another dehydrated pear

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

the sharp tang
of sorrel flowers
twilight ramble

Lucy Whitehead
Essex, UK

 

a slithering shimmer
in the grass
I gulp my fear

Madhuri Pillai

 

hot and thirsty
she chews on Yerba santa*
hiking up Baldy

(*A medicinal herb that grows in our mountains. It has a pleasant, thirst-quenching, taste.)

Marcyn Del Clements
Claremont, California, USA

 

sweet gum twig
trailside
toothbrush

Margaret Walker

 

some chocolate –
dirty look
of the guide

Margherita Petriccione

 

hiking elevation
even the water tastes
of paradise

Margo Williams
Stayton, Oregon

 

countryside –
tastes of nostalgia
wild chicory

Maria Teresa Piras

 

narrow path –
blackberries juice
on my lips

Maria Teresa Sisti

 

walk’s end…
the triumphant taste
of trail mix

Marietta McGregor

 

Pink orchids thrive in
the rainforest canopy –
just taste their flavor.

Mark Rosenholz
Albany, NY

 

hillside picnic a feast of autumn colours

Martha Magenta
England, UK

 

hike evening
snowy smooth
sugar moon

Megumi Shibuya
Japan

 

Winter hike –
the taste of falling snow
on my tongue

michael ceraolo
South Euclid, Ohio

 

Salisbury Pass
the sweet taste of self
satisfaction

Michael Henry Lee

 

truffle hunt –
tasting trifles and tidbits
along the trail

Michael H. Lester
Los Angeles CA USA

 

nature run
all the tastes of autumn
replaced by smoke

(Dedicated to all those affected by the California wildfires.)

Michael Smeer
Haarlemmermeer, The Netherlands

 

foraging
wondering if this mushroom
is safe

Mike Gallagher
Kerry, Ireland

 

morning campfire
a hint of aspen
in our cowboy coffee

Mike Stinson
Omaha, Nebraska

 

a peach branch
hangs – we continue
our climb

Mohammad Azim Khan

 

taking a break
they snack
on trail mix

Nancy Brady
Huron, Ohio

 

blackberry bush
along the old footpath…
taste of childhood

Natalia Kuznetsova
Russia

 

trail end
the taste remains
of wild berries

Nazarena Rampini
Italy

 

pausing
on the forest trail
wild strawberries

Olivier Schopfer
Geneva, Switzerland

 

two-handed eating…
on the berry trail
with granny

Pat Davis
Pembroke, NH  USA

 

rest stop
we share the apple
with a worm

Philip Whitley
SC, USA

 

lost compass
already, lemon cream pie
comes to mind

Pris Campbell

 

summer trekking
emptied coke cans
rolling one by one

Radhamani  sarma
Chennai

 

midnight hike
the taste of cold
after you

Radostina Dragostinova
Bulgaria

 

bittersweet berries
weigh down the branches
left behind

Randy Brooks

 

enjoying trail mix
mouthful after mouthful
squirrels follow

Rehn Kovacic

 

trail end –
strawberries
on her lips

Réka Nyitrai

 

path to fruition…
popping tart wild blackberries
into happy mouths

Richard Grahn
Evanston, Illinois

 

Blue Ridge trail
the baby tilts back
to taste the rain

Roberta Beary
County Mayo, Ireland

 

venice back streets –
honeyed wine
by moonlight

robyn brooks
usa

 

fluffernutter
tops off the mountain
lasts the way down

ron scully

 

O’Bannon Creek trail
the savor of fall
in fresh creek water

Ronald K. Craig
Batavia, OH  USA

 

the pleasant taste
of rosehip berries
just picked

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

sparkling stream
so this is how
the mountains taste

Sanjuktaa Asopa

 

school trip hiking trail
the chalky taste
of the granola bar

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY, USA

 

red dell
a coppery taste
to the col

simonj
UK

 

summer morning –
off the hiking trail
the taste of blackberry

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

fourth day of hike
in my dream the taste
of steak medium rare

Stephen A. Peters

 

sunrise hike
the hot coffee
in his kiss

Susan Mallernee

 

Valley trail leads to
broad rows of apple
sweetness.

Susan Lee Roberts
Sacramento, CA USA

 

at trail’s end
I taste your last chocolate
bittersweet

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, CA, USA

 

on the way of hike
a tea break
deep autumn taste

Tomoko Nakata
Japan

 

hiking…
suddenly falls
of hazelnuts

Tsanka Shishkova

 

midday hike –
wild berries fresh
from the bush

Valentina Ranaldi-Adams
Fairlawn, Ohio USA

 

morning coffee
finding the trail
where it left me

Valorie Broadhurst Woerdehoff

 

summer hike…
nothings tastes better
than water

Vandana Parashar

 

tasting
the joy of this hike
first snow

Victor Ortiz
Bellingham, WA

 

city smog
inhaling the taste of freshness
mountain trail

Vishnu Kapoor

 

lunch break at the gym
hiking on the treadmill
salty taste of sweat

Yanwei Cai
Los Angeles, CA

 

 

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada and an Associate Member of the League of Canadian Poets. She recently co-edited an anthology of crime-themed haiku called Body of Evidence: a collection of killer ’ku.

 

This Post Has 54 Comments

  1. Thank you Kathy for including my haiku. Many tasteful selections here! I particularly was struck Christina Sng’s, Alan Summers’s, Yanwei Cai’s and Deb Kolodji’s haiku.

    1. Thanks Sari! 🙂
      .
      the taste
      of freedom
      solo hike
      .
      Christina Sng
      .
      .
      This would make for a great performance haiku as well, as Christina Sng judges the line breaks that would also make for great performance pauses after every single line.
      .
      .
      anniversary hike
      the green M&Ms
      in our trail mix
      .
      Deborah P Kolodji
      .
      .
      I’m guessing those greenies don’t usually go into shop packets of trail mix, so I love the humour and irony (in correct meaning of the term). Highly original, but there is more harnessing the humour as the opening line could be happy or sad, reflective, or just a great get together, perhaps with everyone less sporty than in earlier years?
      .
      A great use of words with anniversary and ‘green’ where there is so much more than is apparent on a first reading. It’s great!!! 🙂
      .
      A must have collection is:
      Deborah P Kolodji’s “highway of sleeping towns”
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgGtgq_avMw
      .
      .
      school trip hiking trail
      the chalky taste
      of the granola bar
      .
      Sari Grandstaff
      .
      .
      Yep! 🙂 I always think candy bars, dressed up as proper energy food, fall short of just a healthy but useful fruit and veg bowl. I always had a massive combo of fresh and raw veg mixed with pawpaw and mango, other fruit, herbs such as bananas (yes, it’s a herb folks! 🙂 ) and nuts and raisons. Never got that nasty energy drain from high and processed sugar bars.
      .
      Chalky is a neat pun on chalk sticks and chalkboards and makes me wonder if the group are replaying their happy student days.
      .
      Great use all round with ‘key words’! 🙂

      1. thanks for this, Alan – also, the green M&M’s were thought to have special powers… another urban myth, I believe…

          1. Thanks to Sari, Alan, and kjmunro for the comments and analysis of my haiku. When I was a teenager, we used to giggle about green M&M’s and their alleged aphrodiastic properties. (I was a teenager in the 70’s at the height of this urban myth)

            https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/green-mms-aphrodisiacs/

            I am glad it struck a chord with readers.

            (Thanks, also, Alan for the plug of my book.)

  2. Thank you Alan for such a close analysis of my poem. Yes I did think about orher versions but ‘ his mother ‘ gave me the tongue in cheek that i was looking for. :)) thanks again

  3. morning campfire
    a hint of aspen
    in our cowboy coffee
    .
    Mike Stinson
    Omaha, Nebraska
    .
    .
    Just love this! I feel I’m in one of those old cowboy movies or TV series, from The Monroes to The Virginian or Rawhide, or Bonanza, and so many more!

  4. Thanks a lot Kathy for including my poem. A very enjoyable and rewarding exercise every week,also thanks to Alan for his comments and valuable insight. I enjoyed reading ‘taste of mountain’ ‘salami sandwich ‘ Alan’s and Madhuri’s ku among others. Touched by ‘California fires’ I was in the US around that time and in California. Best regards,arvinder

    1. Thanks Arvinder! 🙂
      .
      Although I’m a big fan of chai (authentically made chai while working in India) and ordinary tea (no ice cubes! 🙂 ) when I’m out and about, horse rides, or hotels and conferences etc… it’s almost always hot black coffee (no ice cubes again, sorry! 🙂 )
      .
      picnic in the hills –
      a taste of his mother’s pickle
      in the kiss
      .
      arvinder kaur
      Chandigarh, India
      .
      Here we have a close relationship between the two image sections, with the opening section giving us a double wonderful picture of not only a picnic, so often in fields, or beaches, but “in the hills”.
      .
      Then first line of the second section (middle line) we know homemade pickle by the man’s mom is included, and then a cheeky and interesting surprise last line.
      .
      If it had said ‘my mother’s pickle in the kiss” or ‘my mother’s pickle in his kiss” it would have achieved interesting dynamics, but “his mother’s pickle in the kiss” is the best version.
      .
      For the closer reading we are rewarded with the idea that perhaps “his” mother is a strong presence in their lives and sometimes positive sometimes interfering and overbearing perhaps. Some mothers-in-law can be intimidating, and even display jealously, perhaps not letting go.
      .
      Of course his mother may just be a fantastic cook and it would be foolish not to take advantage of great homemade fare, and it’s far cheaper too!
      .
      The haiku and the careful and crafted placement and ordering of words elevates this beyond a straight one layer meaning.
      .
      Should the haiku be made more minimal?
      .
      e.g.
      .

      picnic in the hills –
      his mother’s pickle
      in the kiss
      .
      .
      It works fine, but the rhythm is more musical and poetic if we keep the original:
      .
      .
      picnic in the hills –
      a taste of his mother’s pickle
      in the kiss
      .
      .
      “a taste” is vital to the musicality of the poem, and not all haiku need to be ‘super-minimalist’.
      .
      A truly wonderful and memorable haiku word by word and line by line! 🙂

  5. For me, Michael Smeer’s “all the tastes of autumn / replaced by smoke” became sad and sinister (mostly the former) when linked with his dedication “to those affected by the California wildfires.” I join Valentina in thanking him for it.

    Because of it, Bill Pauly’s haiku took on added meaning, moving me.

    smoky taste
    of the forest
    heartbeats away

    …………

    Was reminded how powerfully taste can evoke memory, found myself in two places at once, and felt a nourishing maternal presence reading:

    along the way
    back in my mother’s kitchen –
    salami sandwich

    Anna Maria Domburg-Sancristoforo

    Had similar feelings reading: “a taste of his mother’s pickle /in the kiss”— arvinder kaur

    ……….

    Really enjoyed the element of discovery (“so this is how/ the mountains taste“) in Sanjuktaa Asopa’s haiku. It’s almost as if a riddle or wondering has been solved.

    sparkling stream
    so this is how
    the mountains taste

    …………

    Thanks, Kathy, Alan, all — for poetry and commentary.

    1. I enjoyed your thought-provoking comments, Christina Pecoraro, among others . . . Thank you!
      .
      And thank you again, Kathy, for including my contribution.
      .
      This probing deeper into our own sub-consciousness has brought out, for me, the importance of how all our senses play into appreciating the world around us, and how this works so effectively through the ‘simplicity’ of haiku. It’s a lovely combination!

      1. Thanks, Ingrid from Macedonia.
        .
        Musing upon your haiku below, I find myself wanting to play nomad, sipping laughter along with tea.
        .
        trail break at a nomad camp –
        sweet tea
        sipped between laughter

    2. Thanks Christina! 🙂
      .
      .
      sun’s buttery flavor
      sits on my tongue
      defying snowdrops
      .
      Christina Pecoraro
      .
      .
      Just love that last line of:
      .
      “defying snowdrops”
      .
      .
      Brings a big 🙂

      1. Dear esteemed poet,
        Greetings! the alliterative effect created in the first line and the visual image dipping in the auditory perception also, add a telling effect on the haiku. As you have verily mentioned ” a lovely phrase. ” this is how the mountain taste”

        sparkling stream
        so this is how
        the mountains taste

  6. First of all my deepest commiserations to those who passed away in Malibu, a place I remember with great fondness. Secondly, to the Chicago family of Jemel Roberson, shot dead by authorities, while saving many lives. Such an extreme in both situations. Although we think we can always walk and move around in safety and for pleasure it’s not always that simple, and for some light relief, I’d like to talk about this wonderful haiku:
    .
    .

    hike in low light
    remnants of a spiderweb
    across my mouth
    .
    Carol Dilworth
    .
    .

    We read so much about juxtaposition, and it can seem quite a science! 🙂
    .
    How far apart should two different images distance themselves?
    .
    Well Carol Dilworth certainly cracked this one! 🙂
    .
    Without the first line the last two lines, in my humble opinion, would not make sense. But we’ve all made low light journeys, whether hiking or across our garden if we have one etc…
    .
    The very effect of a spiderweb is that it’s an active trap, a spider’s larder waiting for supplies. Thankfully humans are too large to ensnare! 🙂
    .
    Well executed haiku, using an example of juxtaposition that doesn’t explain the relationship of the image, but that you would certainly need both. And it has humour as well as the horror of too much spiderweb (active) or cobweb (abandoned) because we didn’t close our mouth, certainly an irony too! 🙂

  7. Kathy, thank-you for including my haiku. Thank-you to Michael Smeer for dedicating his to the victims, of the fires in California, in the USA. I did notice that many of the haiku this time had to do with berries.

  8. Thank you Kathy once again! A joy to read and I am always amazed of what visual imagery I gain even when focusing on sense of taste!.

    Specifically…

    sandwiched
    between high dry walls
    desert watercress

    m. shane pruett

    and a nice play on the word choice sandwiched!

    It is always interesting to “taste” feelings as well. I noted several that I enjoyed reading that brought that to a reality for me. Never mind all the trail mix, berries, teas and coffees. What a joy to read today! Thank you once again.

    1. Thank you Margo!

      I’ve had a hard time with the ‘taste’ sessions in the past but I enjoyed this. So many watercress sandwiches in the U.S. desert southwest but I’d never thought about them poetically until this prompt and thinking back on all those hikes.

      There are some fantastic images in this collection. Can’t wait to sample more leisurely later.
      Thank you again.

  9. Congrats to all the poets.
    Thank you, Kathy, for including my haiku into this beautiful, inspiring collection, and for your comment; universality of our dreaming experiences is really fascinating for me 🙂

  10. A tasty line up, and great to read.
    .
    foraging
    wondering if this mushroom
    is safe
    .
    Mike Gallagher
    .
    Something to be treated with caution and respect, personally, I just photograph the little lovelies and leave well alone.

      1. thanks for this Carol & Mike – my husband forages for mushrooms in the Yukon, but I limit myself to the low-bush cranberries & a few mossberries

  11. Berry, berry delicious haiku this week…thanks for including one of mine in this trail mix of savory delights, Kathy. Always love reading them all, but now I am hungry.

    1. I didn’t realise trail mix was so rampant on the walk! 🙂
      .
      But mind you, after reading decades ago, how good Kendal Mint Cake was, I was hugely disappointed it was just a slab of processed sugar and a bit of mint flavor! 🙂
      .
      Instead of a sugar buzz or rush, it was an energy drain. A tin of WWII rations, even stone cold, will always appeal to me more as a memory of a training walk across the Black Mountains in Wales! 🙂

      1. 🙂 the mint cake certainly wasn’t as appealing as it sounds, I too was disappointed when I purchased some many years ago.
        Taking a trek in the Black Mountains is on my bucket list…yes I know, on my doorstep. One day 🙂

  12. “…for those of you who are curtailing the number of poems in your submissions, I think this can be a valuable exercise in reviewing one’s own work to try to see it through the potential editor’s eyes…” —KJMunro aka Kathy
    .

    Wise words from Kathy! 🙂
    .
    The combination of being a fan, and a student of haiku, and in particularly first and foremost “a reader of haiku,” and then secondly as a writer myself, in addition as being an editor, and a mentor and online tutor, I can really enjoy all “the colours of haiku” and more! 🙂

    .
    While I continue to strive to make my own work stronger, and dare not take anything for granted, I’ve been fortunate to have been asked to be an editor for a number of journals, and a few anthologies. I’ve also run haiku contests, and been approached to judge other ones too.
    .
    So what I do when I read work in a print or online journal, or any poems on the internet is combine the thrill of being “the reader” (and fan) of haiku, and my editor’s eye. If I’m judging a contest, which I rarely do now as I run courses on haiku, I keep the same passion I had, when I first came to haiku, with being an excited fan of this genre for now over 25 years.
    .
    I’ve made a lot of mistakes over my own haiku over the early years and I now find that it’s a bonus because I can see strengths as well as weaknesses in my work.
    .
    Why?
    .
    I can still “see” the poem, as if it’s in its chrysalis stage, and still be as excited. I feel most of our work, whether published or not, as something in progress. Lots of published poets, both in journals, and then later in their collections, will continue to tweak, edit, and revise. It’s a great brain workout because we use both our creative instinctive side, and then our analytical problem solving half of our brain! It’s a win-win situation. 🙂
    .
    And there’s always something to learn, and here’s just one out of many so many wonderful examples of terrific poems!
    .
    Plus I hope to comment on others through the rest of the week.
    .
    .

    hiking kiss the mints in her sack
    Adrian Bouter
    .
    .
    There’s two great phrases here! 🙂
    .
    The two word opening section of this one line haiku, and ‘the mints in her sack’ both combine to make this a fun verse, with a hint of mystery for me. How can a kiss on a hiking walk taste of mints in someone’s bag? But of course it’s entirely possible they had a mint or two earlier and put them back in their bag. But I find delightful room for romantic wondering about a regular couple, or two people that found romance on the walk? Or perhaps one person is so intimately known to the other person, it was a shortcut to having a mint without all the rigamole of asking, and the rummage through the bag?
    .
    This haiku is full of taste, and deftly combines subtle humour, romance, and a little healthy intrigue. Brilliant! 🙂
    .
    Here’s more about one line haiku:
    http://area17.blogspot.com/2016/12/travelling-single-line-of-haiku-one.html
    .
    .
    And I’m going to enjoy coming back for more poems here! 🙂

    1. thanks as always for this Alan! I will be referencing your link to one-line haiku at a future solstice haiku meeting for sure!

  13. Dear Kahy,

    Your choice again,
    How language plays in rhythms of windfalls of this haiku!

    path through the orchard
    the sweetness of summer
    in the windfall’s flesh

    Rachel Sutcliffe

    A wonderful delicacy expressed in sweet and supple way.

      1. Dear esteemed poet,
        Greetings!
        “It’s a lovely verse by Rachel with a cracking good line of ‘in the windfall’s flesh’! 🙂'” you said;
        yes very much ; unusual rhythm ringing ever “in the windfall flesh”
        with regards
        S.Radhamani

  14. Dear Kathy,
    Greetings! What a pleasant combination of tastes, blackberries,berries, strawberries, enticing our taste buds here!

    Blackberries
    Suddenly taste of bananas…
    Hiking in my dream

    Anna Victoria Goluba

    trailside pause
    the taste of berries
    on your lips

    Gary Evans
    Stanwood, Washington

    in the undergrowth the strawberries:
    little kisses along the path

    Giuliana Ravaglia

    and finally

    sandwiched
    between high dry walls
    desert watercress

    m. shane pruett

    And how apt your comment “double meanings of English Language” A pleasure to be in the orchids of haiku.

    1. Thank you for the kind words, Radhamani. This week was indeed a taste extravaganza! (And empty Coke cans in Chennai, too, I see.)

    2. thanks so much for sharing here, S.Radhamani, & for your kind words, & also thanks to Alan & Gary for your comments as well…

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