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HAIKU DIALOGUE – Poet’s Choice – Gourmet Gallery – sight

Welcome to Poet’s Choice!

Let’s talk about haiku!

For this series, each poet may send one haiku on the week’s theme, and it will be included in the blog post. There is no selection process. The haiku appear in the order in which we received them.

Submit an original unpublished poem via our Contact Form by Saturday midnight on the theme of the week, including your name as you would like it to appear, and place of residence. (If you send more than one poem, only the first one will be posted.)

Please note that by submitting, you agree that your work may appear in the column – neither acknowledgment nor acceptance emails will be sent. All communication about the poems that are posted in the column will be added as blog comments.

next week’s theme:  GOURMET GALLERY – food & the sense of smell

The deadline for this theme is midnight Pacific Time, Saturday 12 October 2019.

I look forward to reading your submissions.

Poet’s Choice:  Gourmet Gallery – sight

Here are the submissions for this week:

a rare treat
the colours of cheese
and fruits

Christina Chin

 

dinner on the lawn
a piece of undissolved moon
in my soup dish

Anitha Varma
Kerala, India

 

tasting all –
wish I was
the chief cook

Lakshmi Iyer

 

gli occhi pieni
la tavola imbandita
ricca la cena

eyes full
the laid table
rich dinner

vincenzo adamo

 

Thanksgiving dinner
family photo around
the table

Barbara Tate

 

meat market
my
appetite dies

B. McG

 

last apricot
I look back to
starry tree

Guliz Mutlu

 

gourmet dining
leaving the garnish leaf
uneaten

Jackie Chou
Pico Rivera, CA USA

 

commanding
my Pavlovian response
French Patisserie

Michele L. Harvey

 

chai cider latte
in transparent jar – teasing
my tongue

Radhamani sarma

 

starving woman
struts the gold lame gown
past the laden buffet

nancy liddle

 

seafood market
ice eyes
of unsold fish

Serhiy Shpychenko
Kyiv, UA

 

bitter goblet…
among the oleanders in bloom
her silences

Francesco Palladino

 

pasta and bean soup
with every bite
I see my father

maništra i fažol
sa svakin zalogajen
vidin mog ćaću

Aljoša Vuković
Šibenik, Croatia

 

hint of lime in zest
the brunch I had at
a last idyllic evening

Neelam Dadhwal
India

 

that pause before
making a mess of it
millefeuille

Olivier Schopfer
Switzerland

 

in their milky way
a constellation of flakes
orbiting my spoon

Sari Grandstaff
Saugerties, NY

 

Rejected in love
I have lost my appetite
All food is still life

Margie Gustafson
Lombard, IL USA

 

hungry for two days
onion and salt on roti
sudden saliva

Vishnu Kapoor

 

a gourmet’s plate
feeding eyes with colours
my stomach’s rumbling

Saša Slavković
Slovenia

 

my blueberries drip
down purple juice
…a delicious misnomer

joel

 

gourmet gallery
he eyes exotic options
to spice up life

Anjali Warhadpande

 

roasted pig –
in the deep autumn
some wine

Dennys Cambarau

 

baked lasagna
enjoyed also with the eyes –
my daughter is back

lasagne al forno
gustate anche con gli occhi –
mia figlia è tornata

(baked lasagna is a typical dish of some Italian regions much appreciated (even by my daughter when she comes back from university))

Angela Giordano
Italy

 

whiff of veggie soup
threw me right back
into tenth grade

Eva Su
Indonesia

 

oyster bar
just close your eyes
slurp

Paul Geiger
Sebastopol CA

 

Good god!
little girl eating decorations
of the wedding cake

Franjo Ordanic

 

I open the fridge
fat sausages
goodbye diet

Goran Radičević

 

a cozy place
in the colours of autumn
big bowl of calor

Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe

 

steam rises
purple eggplant
with green mint

Rehn Kovacic

 

Italian pasta…
the red of the tomatoes
the green of the basil

Rosa Maria Di Salvatore

 

morning train
garlic bread
in her lunch box

Neni Rusliana
Indonesia

 

surprise cookies
which one has a wasabi

Dubravka Šćukanec
Zagreb, Croatia

 

wisdom of the fish
gourmet selections always
seen through a clear eye

Sherrod Taylor

 

quarter of a roti –
something of me
in the waning moon

(roti is a round flatbread native to the Indian subcontinent)

arvinder kaur
Chandigarh, India

 

looking carefully
at the gourmet gallery
I become satiated

Tomislav Maretić

 

gourmet gallery
face to face with fish
no, i can’t do it

Slobodan Pupovac
Zagreb, Croatia

 

farmers’ market
produce
out of uniform

Laurie Greer
Washington, DC

 

a light dusting
on a curl of chocolate
coulis partly frozen

Mark Gilbert
UK

 

harvest moon sized pie
thanksgiving table drama
forgot whipping cream

Kathleen Mazurowski

 

veggie fine dining –
their usual omelet
with swirls of something

Ingrid Baluchi
Ohrid, Macedonia

 

kaiseki dinner
every color and shape
in harmony

Mark Meyer

 

still night –
the smell of warm bread
at the window

Maria Teresa Piras

 

saturday dine out
aiming for the perfect shot
before the first bite

Bona M. Santos
Los Angeles, CA

 

sausage
from the gourmet kitchen
stole the cat

Ljiljana Dobra
Sibenik Croatia

 

fragole rosse:
la camicia spoglia di ogni rimorso

red strawberries:
the shirt bare of any remorse

Giuliana Ravaglia

 

unable to look you in the eye  doughnut O

simonj
UK

 

meat market
the butcher eyes
my wife

Rich Schilling
Webster Groves, MO

 

visual feast
nourished by blossoms
and autumn leaves

Lori Zajkowski

 

food for thought –
in the sight of all offers
forgetting what you need

Adrian Bouter

 

the fifth date
between me and his rare steak
a propped up wine list

Debbie Scheving

 

leftovers
the vagrant’s eyes follow
my hand

Vandana Parashar

 

lasagne
layer by layer
the worms compost the corpse

carol jones

 

wow
wonderful colors on the table –
a fruit fairy tale

Zdenka Mlinar
Croatia

 

in the gallery
food for everyone’s eyes
but not You

Refika Dedić
Bosna I Hercegovina

 

creamy spinach ravioli
my dog too decides
to go vegan

Madhuri Pillai

 

white peaked surprise
my baked Alaska
looks like Mt Fuji

Kath Abela Wilson

 

ode to an onion:
you are so lustrous so crisp
the shape of tears

Steve Tabb

 

city sidewalk –
a mosaic of street foods
makes the scene

Anthony Rabang

 

turmeric rain:
rice and peas wear
autumn colors

Elisa Allo
Switzerland

 

a beauty:
salmon, greens, fruit, dessert

kitchen disaster

Susan Lee Roberts
Sacramento, California, USA

 

park sunshine
all the colours
of ice-cream

andrew shimield

 

seaside restaurant –
with a touch of lemon
raw oysters

Teiichi Suzuki

 

black coffee
the spicy drops
of our love song

Luisa Santoro
Rome, Italy

 

shrimp and grits
dressed
in a martini glass

Margaret Walker

 

half fed
by the aroma from the dish served –
boy was excited

Aju Mukhopadhyay

 

thick fog –
oranges jam
home made

nebbia fitta –
marmellata d’arance
fatta in casa

Angiola Inglese

 

french cheese
in the mousetrap
Bastille Day

cezar ciobîcă

 

the dessert cart
then the blind date
tastes sweet,sideways

Ron Scully

 

prairie dog town
a moveable feast
the field eyes

B Shropshire

 

surf’s up –
a gull flaps away
with my fish sandwich

Pris Campbell

 

mouths’ watering
mother insists we eat
when all guests arrive

wendy c. bialek
prescott valley, az usa

 

grandmother’s pantry…
behind the pickle jars
homemade pear wine

Al Gallia
Lafayette, Louisiana USA

 

for her purple heart
purple carrots purple kale
in a purple bowl

Susan Rogers
Los Angeles, Ca USA

 

two golden waffles,
steamy maple syrup –
a downtown sunrise

Lemuel Waite
Georgetown, Kentucky

 

two bites
of escargot
…drive-thru stop

Nancy Brady
Huron, Ohio

 

white flecks
reflect overhead light
freezer burned fruit

Adam Arn

 

O svijetlom pivu
od pjesnika više zna
njegova muza

About IPA
more than poet itself
knows his Muse

Zrinko Šimunić

 

mango drip…
I start to whisper
sweet nothings

Christine L. Villa

Katherine Munro lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, and publishes under the name kjmunro. She is Membership Secretary for Haiku Canada, and her debut poetry collection is contractions (Red Moon Press, 2019).

This Post Has 51 Comments

  1. I’m a little late to the party this week, but what a fun feast. I got a craving for a pastry I used to buy at a French shop in Portland reading Michelle L. Harvey’s:
    commanding
    my Pavlovian response
    French Patisserie
    *
    Loved the sentiment in Margie Gustafson’s:
    Rejected in love
    I have lost my appetite
    All food is still life
    *
    A clever use of the sight theme is Rich Schilling’s:
    meat market
    the butcher eyes
    my wife
    *
    Poking a little gourmet fun, I enjoyed Margaret Walker’s:
    shrimp and grits
    dressed
    in a martini glass
    *
    Loved the memories, and a little humor, in Al Gallia’s:
    grandmother’s pantry…
    behind the pickle jars
    homemade pear wine
    *
    I found a lovely seasonal image in Elisa Allo’s:
    turmeric rain:
    rice and peas wear
    autumn colors
    *
    I noticed that a few regular contributors that I look forward to reading were missing this week or last. Hope they come back to the table.

    1. This comes as a late comment…”kj’s” white fence photo with crows on The Haiku Foundation’s Troutswirl has already diminished in size.

      Even so, this was an interesting observation of yours, Debbie, in your last paragraph.

      It made me wonder if a few of us make a distinction between eating to live, and living to eat?

  2. Hello eaters, here’s my haiku:

    distant mountains
    whipping up clouds . . .
    last strawberries

    1. Hello Julie. If you want your haiku included in next week’s list of contributions you need to post using the red ” contact form” link in the above paragraphs, before midnight PST tonight. Debbie

    2. hi julie….this sounds like you posted it for this current theme, SIGHT

      distant mountains
      whipping up clouds . . .
      last strawberries

      julie emerson

      Sight….is this a poem that didn’t get included in the list above?

      I think it is wonderful for Gourmet Gallery …sight.
      The next theme is smell….i don’t see anything here that relates to smell,

  3. Thank you Kathy for this wonderful feast for the eyes this week! These three visual victuals stood out for me:

    gourmet dining
    leaving the garnish leaf
    uneaten

    Jackie Chou
    Pico Rivera, CA USA

    I am picturing perhaps a lone parsley leaf now alone amid the remains of a meal being swept into the busboy’s bin.

    french cheese
    in the mousetrap
    Bastille Day

    cezar ciobîcă
    I was equating the mousetrap with a guillotine in my mind. And the idea of good French cheese for the mouse’s last meal instead of some inexpensive processed cheese added some macabre humor for me!

    seafood market
    ice eyes
    of unsold fish

    Serhiy Shpychenko
    Kyiv, UA

    I always feel like the fish are looking at me at the market – an icy stare indeed!

  4. K J MUNRO….can you please tell me if you received my poem posted Wednesday 10/09/2019 at 8:02 am. (pacific time) for next theme…. Gourmet Gallery-smell?

    if you have it…then i might be able to shed some light on the problem…and share it with you and the members here.

    1. Wendy – I received your submission at 8:02 am on Wednesday 09 October, & again at 6:04 pm on Thursday 10 October…
      do tell! kj

      1. KJ MUNRO

        i used a different browser to send these posts. i used MS Internet Explorer….
        My prior browser was Firefox…..and it seems my posts were not always picked up by you. (your server)

        I don’t know why is was intermittent…but so far….three in a row has been getting through….with the new browser.

        i hope this continues.
        and i hope this may help others who may be having difficulty.

        Thank you, for your timely feedback….that helped me to guide myself in the right direction.

        1. I hope this success continues, as well – I will pass along the info to the team…
          thanks, kj

  5. GOURMET GALLERY – food & the sense of sight, October 4, 2019 (sent 10:53am)

    .

    lasagna leftovers
    at midnight
    my fat cat winks at me
    .

    John S Green
    Purringham, WA

    1. cute! John S. Green….i might have found out what the form posting problem might be…..i’ll be able to more accurately hone in on it….when i find out if my next poem was seen by KJ Munro. and then i’ll get back to you.

    2. John S. Green

      i used MS Internet Explorer….(instead of
      my prior browser Firefox)….. and so far….three poems in a row have gone through with success!

      i hope this continues.
      and i hope this may help you and others who may be having difficulty.

  6. Wow – so many “views” on the sight of food here. (I love this return to focusing on one sense at a time!)

    Too many good ones to comment on but I wanted to say I laughed out loud at Paul Geiger’s

    oyster bar
    just close your eyes
    slurp

    I learned to eat oysters by a campfire – it was too dark to see what we are eating or I don’t think I would have tried them. Now I love the sight of a freshly shucked oyster.

  7. Thank you everyone! As usual, I copy out my favourites as I read and try to select three (more or less) to share. Looking at my short list, I realize now that they bring out different ways sight comes into play in our relationship with food: the cringe factor (but Serhiy lets us decide), refined aesthetics, and imagination.
    .
    seafood market
    ice eyes
    of unsold fish
    .
    Serhiy Shpychenko
    Kyiv, UA
    .
    .
    kaiseki dinner
    every color and shape
    in harmony
    .
    Mark Meyer
    .
    .
    white peaked surprise
    my baked Alaska
    looks like Mt Fuji
    .
    Kath Abela Wilson

    1. nice choices…Janice

      Somehow i never read kath’s.

      white peaked surprise
      my baked Alaska
      looks like Mt Fuji
      .
      Kath Abela Wilson

      i like this playful one, kath!

  8. I have to admit that this prompt stumped me. My haiku doesn’t really fit as I concentrated on the word gourmet, and frankly, my experience of gourmet dishes is limited. Thus, I remembered the scene from the Steve Martin movie, The Jerk, and could imagine hitting a drive-thru for a burger and fries. Maybe I will do better with this week’s prompt.
    .
    I think there are some excellent ‘my on the theme. Well done.

    1. I enjoyed yr escargot haiku and i wouldn’t have have even taken two bites. Some of these prompts can really be challenging (although I always welcome the challenge). Good to know I’m not the only one who struggles through some of them.

      1. I also find every one a struggle. I didn’t even think about the gourmet aspect here, just food in general and different sights of it. I’m always impressed by the sheer range of responses–so much comes up that would never occur to me! My horizons widen every week.

  9. city sidewalk –
    a mosaic of street foods
    makes the scene

    Anthony Rabang

    nice line 1 & 2 from a wide angle lens…that last line is unnecessary.

  10. prairie dog town
    a moveable feast
    the field eyes

    B Shropshire
    *
    on the way to the hospital, we passed a huge field, with prairie dogs popping their heads up out of holes in the ground…..
    when we lived in Colorado, it was the first time i ever saw prairie dogs…..you brought me right back there…with this poem!

  11. Dear Kathy Munro,
    Greetings. Delighted to be- smell so many dishes- approaches. My favorite of many follows thus: How often it takes place in our household. very fine observation.

    mouths’ watering
    mother insists we eat
    when all guests arrive

    wendy c. bialek
    prescott valley, az usa

    1. thank you….so much, Radhamani sarma….perhaps you were raised similarly …..no one ate until all the invites were present. (teaching inclusion, curtesy, respect and discipline) Mom…was the best gourmet cook in the entire family….everyone looked forward to her delights….often the trusty, traditional recipes, but always new experimental dishes as well. she was always learning new techniques, and new ways of decorating dishes. Secondarily, it was also important to have the great reveal….like lifting a cloth off a painting…. we just had her birthday acknowledgement though she would be reading it from above.

  12. in their milky way
    a constellation of flakes
    orbiting my spoon
    .
    Sari Grandstaff
    .
    So many submissions this week lack a visual element, but here “constellation” stands out, and the orbital motion brings the haiku to life.
    The figurative/literal overlap of stars and (corn)flakes provides for comparison, and the momentary confusion of reading “flakes” is nicely resolved with the last word.

    1. Simon,
      *

      in their milky way
      a constellation of flakes
      orbiting my spoon
      .
      Sari Grandstaff

      Sari’s poem creatively describes her visual experience of consuming the last flakes of cereal floating in her milky bowl…as seen through a hidden telescopic lens pointed towards the heavens….her vivid metaphors
      yet…..the only open space left…was what kind of flakes….you saw corn…..i see bran.

      the visual in a haiku poem….is not always in the written word….it is often in the space between words….left to be conjured in the mind of the reader. I appreciate more and more these days…the writings that allow me more open windows to place my own images inside them…..

  13. unable to look you in the eye doughnut O

    simonj

    FYI – there is a pause after “eye”, indicated by a double space, which used to be reproducable on the contact form but not in these comments.

  14. 1st picks for gourmet gallery -sight

    dinner on the lawn
    a piece of undissolved moon
    in my soup dish

    Anitha Varma
    Kerala, India

    reflects the theme of “sight” well….makes me look into the bowl and see that moon that won’t go away….won’t melt or breakdown. very creative use of “undissolved moon” as if it were a bouillon cube

  15. thick fog –
    oranges jam
    home made

    nebbia fitta –
    marmellata d’arance
    fatta in casa
    .
    This one stood out for me in many more ways than one.

    1. ********Problem POSTING comments********

      this is a test…..comments are not coming through…is any one else having a problem posting here?

  16. So many treats this week–I was especially taken with these:
    *
    seafood market
    ice eyes
    of unsold fish

    Serhiy Shpychenko
    Kyiv, UA
    *
    love the sound of all those sss’s–like scales over the whole poem–as well as the visuals of sea/eyes; an immediate and vivid scene
    *
    pasta and bean soup
    with every bite
    I see my father

    maništra i fažol
    sa svakin zalogajen
    vidin mog ćaću

    Aljoša Vuković
    Šibenik, Croatia
    *
    wonderfully Proustian–and so often food is associated with particular people and places
    *

    in their milky way
    a constellation of flakes
    orbiting my spoon

    Sari Grandstaff
    Saugerties, NY
    *
    this all works wonderfully–from the milky way to the constellation to the echo of moon in spoon.
    *
    oyster bar
    just close your eyes
    slurp

    Paul Geiger
    Sebastopol CA
    *
    another one rich in sound and sight–eating is maybe one of our most synesthetic experiences. i can well picture and hear this. Love the economy of the language, too

    *
    steam rises
    purple eggplant
    with green mint

    Rehn Kovacic

    *
    marvellous how the steam reveals the colors–the unveiling of a masterpiece, perhaps (interesting how purple keeps turning up this week too)
    *

    veggie fine dining –
    their usual omelet
    with swirls of something

    Ingrid Baluchi
    Ohrid, Macedonia

    *
    my feeling exactly in higher-end establishments–wonderful touch of humor
    *
    lasagne
    layer by layer
    the worms compost the corpse

    carol jones

    *
    too true! nicely done
    *

    as always, too many strong poems to comment on each; thanks to everyone for contributing

    1. Thank you, Laurie!
      Not that I dislike omelets, but when that’s the only choice given vegetarians in a restaurant, one’s bound to be a little disappointed!

  17. Thank you, Kathy for including my verse. Another great line up, and so diverse. Congratulations to all.
    .
    ode to an onion;
    you are so lustrous so crisp
    the shape of tears
    .
    Steve Tabb
    .
    A lovely connection to the onion itself, the shape and the effect it has on the eyes, and of course that gorgeous taste, whether hot or mild.

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